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Mefloquine (AKA Lariam) is the large 'horse-pill" anti-malaria pill given to US troops for decades. It is a neurotoxin and sufferers are often confused with suffering PTSD and related problems. It's the next military related disaster for anyone that has taken this pill. Note, not taking the pill, but has taken the pill! It is even worse if combined with pain killers and other medications. Suicide, and related self-inflicted stabbings are common problems.

See: Mefloquine: The Military's Suicide Pill | Dr. Remington Nevin

Mefloquine: The Military?s Suicide Pill | MILITARY JUSTICE FOR ALL

The Kill Pill: Murder, Madness, and the Army's Mefloquine Cover-up - AGE OF AUTISM

Also, view this one!!!!!!

 

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If that is the pill that we used in Viet Nam, I can tell you from personal experience that there was a strain of maleria in the northern part of south viet nam that the pill would not protect against. I had maleria over there and then had a relapse of it while I was in college and again a few years later. None since then.
 

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If that is the pill that we used in Viet Nam, I can tell you from personal experience that there was a strain of maleria in the northern part of south viet nam that the pill would not protect against. I had maleria over there and then had a relapse of it while I was in college and again a few years later. None since then.
This drug was developed in the 1970's and has been in use for 40 years. It is the CDC preferred prophylactic treatment for malaria in high risk areas. As with all drugs - there will always be a segment of the population which is susceptible to "adverse effects" because everyone reacts differently to drugs based upon their personal biology. This drug is a synthetic analog of Quinine which has been in use for thousands of years but also has negative side effects. When prescribing drugs like this - one must weigh the "likelihood" of adverse side effects versus the possibility of getting infected with malaria which is prevalent in these regions. If 1%-2% of the troops *may* suffer serious side effects versus 30% who will most likely become infected with malaria - then it becomes a "trade off". There are no "perfect" drugs. :hmmmm:
 

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If this drug did not come about until 1970, it is not the drug we were using when I was in viet nam. I don't remember any side effects of the pill we used, just that one strain of maleria it would not protect against. Also that strain of malaria, while bothersom, was not as strong as others. In my first bout with it I got chills and fevers which were short lived but recurrent for a few days I was left with tiredness and weakness for a few days. Both relapses were the same but shorter in duration.
 

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If that is the pill that we used in Viet Nam, I can tell you from personal experience that there was a strain of maleria in the northern part of south viet nam that the pill would not protect against. I had maleria over there and then had a relapse of it while I was in college and again a few years later. None since then.
We took Chloroquine primaquine, the big orange pill that we took once a week. If you were in an area where there was falciparum malaria, Central Highlands and north, you also had to take Dapzone, the little white pill. Dapzone is mostly used to treat Leprosy, but it seems to work on falciparum too, although you can't find anything about that in the literature anymore. If you were in country early, they hadn't found out that falciparum wasn't completely stopped by Chloroquine primaquine and they weren't using Dapzone yet. Falciparum is the most fatal of the malaria varieties, so, obviously, you had some protection from the Chloroquine. Chloroquine gave a lot of people short term diarrhea, but for the grunts it was a cure for the C-ration constipation.

Thanks for the memories!
 

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I served in the Australian army in Nam 69_70 and if I remember correctly we used Paludrine tablets . Hope I am right here ???Seem to have worked with me anyway .
Cheers , Ron
 

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I took it for 5 months in 1990 in Liberia, Africa. I vaguely recall some warning about using deet and the malaria pill together, which of course we did.
 

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Still finding out how many times I was used as a guinea pig.

Good thing Im too stupid to be effected by all these chemicals
 

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If this drug did not come about until 1970, it is not the drug we were using when I was in viet nam. I don't remember any side effects of the pill we used, just that one strain of maleria it would not protect against. Also that strain of malaria, while bothersom, was not as strong as others. In my first bout with it I got chills and fevers which were short lived but recurrent for a few days I was left with tiredness and weakness for a few days. Both relapses were the same but shorter in duration.
Pretty sure we used Quinine bear. Yellow pills. Only side effect I can remember is a bad taste in my mouth for Hippy's.
 

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When reading stories like this one must look at "the big picture" if you will. As noted - all drugs when introduced into the body induce "side effects" of some type. In the case of this video - there is obviously a certain amount of histrionics involved to say nothing of the inferences to "legal defenses". As all know - lawyers will grab on to any potential crumb no matter how remote to defend their client or potentially make money in a class action suit. This drug in question has been in use for decades. When you have a "captive population" like the military and it is issued to tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of people over a number of years then you are going to have a percentage that respond adversely. Because these folks are "concentrated" in an area rather than civilians going to and fro across the planet - naturally you are going to see side effects manifest much easier and be able to correlate those to the drug. This is why studies have been done and new warnings issued. When drugs are developed and tested before approval - introducing them into a "special population" such as military where you have a higher incidence of brain trauma and psychiatric disorders secondary to combat does not happen. We are now seeing what can happen with these cases so that usage of this drug can be avoided in the future for them. This is not "intentional" - it is merely a natural result of mass use by a concentrated population exposed to unforeseen circumstances. We learn - then we adapt. :hmmmm:
 

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We took Chloroquine primaquine, the big orange pill that we took once a week. If you were in an area where there was falciparum malaria, Central Highlands and north, you also had to take Dapzone, the little white pill. Dapzone is mostly used to treat Leprosy, but it seems to work on falciparum too, although you can't find anything about that in the literature anymore. If you were in country early, they hadn't found out that falciparum wasn't completely stopped by Chloroquine primaquine and they weren't using Dapzone yet. Falciparum is the most fatal of the malaria varieties, so, obviously, you had some protection from the Chloroquine. Chloroquine gave a lot of people short term diarrhea, but for the grunts it was a cure for the C-ration constipation.

Thanks for the memories!
I took the single orange pill regularly, but didn't take the white pill you mention. I was medevaced from a mountain top with 105.6 temp and falciparum malaria. However, I've had no relapses and no side effects in the many years since 1969.
 

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When I had my relapse in college we had a doctor who had just gotten out of the army and knew about the stuff. He got the VA to rush some quinine and something else to the school. He told me that the stuff stays in your body "forever" and can come back at any time but as I said, I got it in country while I was "out and about" and then came in with it and got treated by the corpmen for it. There was some talk of sending me "to Da Nang" with it but it was starting to ease up so I didn't have to go. There was probably a year and a half until I had the relapse in college and it lasted less than a week. It was four or five years later that I had the last bout with it and it only lasted a very few days. Since then, nothing for about 35-36 years. Life is good.
 

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CtYankee, up on/near the DMZ we took both the big orange pill and the little white one. One was once a week, the other was every day.
I seem to recall that a decade or so ago there was some research that indicated that Dapsone combined with the Agent Orange that was in the water we drank was a realy bad combination.
Do you know anything about that?
 
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CtYankee, up on/near the DMZ we took both the big orange pill and the little white one. One was once a week, the other was every day.
I seem to recall that a decade or so ago there was some research that indicated that Dapsone combined with the Agent Orange that was in the water we drank was a realy bad combination.
Do you know anything about that?
I was never very worried about Agent Orange; I was in II Corps on a firebase between An Khe & Pleiku and that area had been defoliated before I got in country, so I never got sprayed. We got our drinking water out of Camp Radcliff in An Khe, although our shower water came from a sunk hole and smelled really bad. We had one gun section that was bothered by skin infections, I had some nasty rashes, but connecting it to Agent Orange, without direct contact, would have been difficult. A very good friend of mine was in the 1st Cav. down in the Parrot's Beak and he got sprayed a couple of times, developed chloracne on the back of his legs, but the VA cleared it up for him. When I was studying Organic Chemistry in college I did a small report on Dapsone, nothing I read connected it to Agent Orange, but then that was in '79. The primay use of Dapsone is as an anti-leprosy drug, don't know why anybody ever thought to use it on Malaria.
 
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I took doxycycline hyclate, 100 mg daily,as an anti-malarial earlier this year and decided to risk malaria - it made me dizzy and irritable (more than normal). There really aren't anti-malarials w/o side effects, I hear. Young American sprouts with guns here swear Copenhagen kills malaria and dengue fever. . .
 
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