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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just scoped one 35 Rem rifle and wanted to put a receiver sight on the other. I have used the Williams FP and the Lyman 66 on several Winnies and TC Hawkens and both have served me well.

It seems that the Lyman has lost a bit of the ruggedness of the old steel version so I was all ready to buy a Williams Foolproof for the 35 Rem.

Nothing is ever easy. Now I see that they have two versions for the 336. A traditional side mount and the top mount. Please give you opinions and experiences on the comparison.

All of my other sights have been side mount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I ordered the top-mount by mistake!

Decided to give it a try on my 30-30 Glenfield, and am quite happy. I'm not sure there's much of a practical difference between the two, except the mounting.





Regards, Guy
That looks nice. One concern seems to be interference with the hammer. I see that you have the hammer spur. If you didn't have that would it still be easy to manipulate? That seems to be the main concern in the reviews that I have just read. I figured it would be best to ask you all here that may have more experience.

By the way, those are great pictures and give me a better idea of what to expect.Thanks
 

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Williams makes a guide sight series that is light, compact and inexpensive. The base mounts on back scope base holes. The sight
is adjusted for elevation by opposing sliding wedges, similar to the sights on Remington products. They are locked by set screw. The
rear blade is dovetailed and is also drifted for windage and locked with set screw. The various blades avaible include a one that is
tapped to accept standard apperature. It doesn't have the luxury of click adjustments but not many guys dope their 30/30 sight for
hunting purposes. They are sighted in and locked. I have had these sights on Ruger 10/22, Ruger 44, and Rem 742-760 series rifles
and they hold 0 and are not brush catchers. I only have 3 Lever guns that I do crank the Reciever sights. A 39 that I shot Silos with
and had witness plate marked for ranges. A 1895 that I did the same thing for range shooting and my 30/30 Marauder that I did
the same just to freak people out on what a short barreled 30/30 can do. I cheat a little because I hustle them with targets at known
ranges and usually shoot from a rest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Williams makes a guide sight series that is light, compact and inexpensive. The base mounts on back scope base holes. The sight
is adjusted for elevation by opposing sliding wedges, similar to the sights on Remington products. They are locked by set screw. The
rear blade is dovetailed and is also drifted for windage and locked with set screw. The various blades avaible include a one that is
tapped to accept standard apperature. It doesn't have the luxury of click adjustments but not many guys dope their 30/30 sight for
hunting purposes. They are sighted in and locked. I have had these sights on Ruger 10/22, Ruger 44, and Rem 742-760 series rifles
and they hold 0 and are not brush catchers. I only have 3 Lever guns that I do crank the Reciever sights. A 39 that I shot Silos with
and had witness plate marked for ranges. A 1895 that I did the same thing for range shooting and my 30/30 Marauder that I did
the same just to freak people out on what a short barreled 30/30 can do. I cheat a little because I hustle them with targets at known
ranges and usually shoot from a rest.
Thank you for this very detailed response. I had heard that the major problem of this route was the need to change the front sight. Did you find this to be a problem? Again I agree that in real life, you pick a load and set the sights for it. Might as well weld it in place if you are sure that this is the load for this gun.

I have a pair of 336's in 35 rem and am more than willing to set one of them up as a brush gun with one load that works. The other is fitted with a scope for playing with pistol bullet loads of different weights, just funning, until just before deer season. At that point both will be sighted in for the same bullet. one scoped and the other peep sighted. If opening day is raining, open sights.
 

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Agree with above and I have a few Williams but if you want one that’s bulletproof look at the Skinner Sights.
 
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I don't know if it's necessary to change front sight. I didn't on Rugers and Rems with Williams Guide sights, I also kept the williams
when I traded guns off. My Marlins have Lymans on them and I put Marbels Patridge blades on them without worrying about using
factories. The 39 has the ramp with blade dovetailed in it, changed it to blade also. I would guess not necessary with Guide series.
They mount lower than the reciver type sights. I think the only reason they are making the top mounted reciever sight is because
some models are no longer D&T on side and they are all D&T for scopes. I don't think the profile changes at all. The Skinner sights
are sturdy and made well. I don't dislike them but think they are over priced for what they are, as well as some other Tatical or
ghost ring sights on the market. The Williams are milled Alumilum as are the Lymans now. Mine are all old steel models except one
had a buddy tour Williams plant and told him to buy me one of their top of line reciever sights for LAs. He did, it cost more at their
factory outlet than from my distributor.

I just remembered, I put Williams guide sights for 742-760 Rems on several shotguns with similar contoured recievers. I guess
12g pumps and autos would put the torture test to them. It was easier to D&T reciever for them than silver solder rear sights on
barrel.
 
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Here is picture of couple of the Guide Sights. Left is for 742-760 Rems...Right is for 10/22 & 44 Ruger (old model)
Bottom are the Marbel Patridge fronts, sold for barrels and narrow base for ramps. Look up Williams products and
they sell bases for about any model you can think of, the sight portion is the same. Williams also makes the fiber
optic Fire Sight sets for Marlins. Electronics Electronic instrument
ko
 
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I slightly prefer the side mount, if your piece came drilled and tapped for such. Otherwise, there is not that much difference in having it on top. I have a nice old .22 that I am about to use a top mount on, so that I don't have to drill and tap for a side mount bracket.
 

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Ya, I've had a number of rifles set up with the side-mount.

Didn't even think about the fact that the newer Marlins were drilled for top-mount, so went onto Brownells site, and ordered the first Williams sight for the 336 that I found... For a couple of minutes I thought about returning it when I saw it was the top mount, then decided to give it a try. I wonder if it actually sits a tad lower than the side mount? Dunno, but I didn't have to change the front sight

I have had to change the front sight on a 336 when I put a side-mount Williams on it.

Haven't tried the Skinner - not sure I really appreciate the design. I grew up shooting rifles with Lyman and Williams receiver sights, and that's what I'm accustomed to, when I don't use a scope.

Guy
 
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