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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some of you guys are getting tough to stump! So I worked a buit harder on this question. Hopefully it will challenge your Marlin knowledge!
In 1937 Marlin bought the patent rights from Sears for about $1,000, to produce the model 90 shotgun. This gun was produced for Sears, and Marlin. The year before, (1936) Marlin purchased the patent rights from Sears for another Marlin item. The price was also $1,000, and Marlin produced these for Sears and Marlin also!
What was the other purchase?
A little help here, you wont find this in the list of Marlin patents, in Brophy's book!
 

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Could it have been the scope mounting system improved by Carl Ekdahl in 1936 ------- obtaining a patent and paying Sears about a grand for the rights?
 

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I 2nd Sneekpete. Parley
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Geez! You guys are too good! I thought I might stump you for a few hours anyway!
Guess I'm gonna have to try harder!
 

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GEOFF said:
Well mm93 you sure as heck stumped me. You guys are WAY over my head but I'm learning!!!

Geoff
Left me in the dust too Geoff. :) I gotta get Brophys book & Flayermans guide if I'm gonna play here.
 

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Hi Guys

Yep those books will help. :D Parley
 

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To me -- that is what it's all about ---- learning.
I am a relative newcomer to the world of Marlins (compared to the rest of you guys).
I got interested (seriously) in 1996 and really got the bug! My son bought Brophy's book for me in '97 and I haven't been right since. I have read it and gone back and read it ---
The key word in this trivia question was Sears. Since I have been collecting Marlin scopes, it was easy! I have read that particular section of the "book" numerous times.
Someday, I hope to have a just a smidge of the knowledge that others here already have. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Pete,
Marlin scopes eh? Glad we live in opposite parts of the country! We'd probably be competing for the same things! I started collecting old scopes before I started collecting Marlins. Love those early scopes with target style mounts!
 

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Vall,
Yep, Marlin Scopes --- I have a real weakness for these. And Marlin Levers, and Marlin Pumps, and Marlin etc.
I only have one of the old #1 scopes -- but it is new in the box, with the bases, drill, tap, and instructions.
Still looking for a #2 and several of the later 60's or 70's vintage models. Have you seen an M-22V?
 

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Sneekpete, mm93,

Now that you bring up these old scopes, I have 3 old scopes that were on older rifles that I bought. 2 of these are old Weaver model 330 and the other is identical to them, also made by Weaver but sold under J.C Higgins.

Do these scopes have any collector value yet?

What store sold the brand J. C. Higgins?

Fill me in please.

Geoff
 

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GEOFF said:
Sneekpete, mm93,

Now that you bring up these old scopes, I have 3 old scopes that were on older rifles that I bought. 2 of these are old Weaver model 330 and the other is identical to them, also made by Weaver but sold under J.C Higgins.

Do these scopes have any collector value yet?

What store sold the brand J. C. Higgins?

Fill me in please.

Geoff
JC Higgins was carried by Sears, Roebuck & Co.

The Weaver 330 was 2.75 X with a 3/4" tube and an eye releif of 3 1/2". It was made from 1930-1947.
Nick Stroebel's book lists these at a value of 80-125 dollars- add 25 dollars for click stop adjustments. If you post a model number for the Higgins scope, I should be able to find a value for it....

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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Thanks a lot Doc Sharptail and 4 eye Buck,

I had an uncle that about 5 years ago sold me most of his guns about a year before he died. The only one of his guns that I really liked was a nice Remington 121-S chambered for .22 Win Rimfire you know the long case but not the magnum. His deer hunting rifle was a Remington 81 in .300 Savage with another Weaver 330 and then he had a Remington military rifle (Mosin Nagant pattern????) that he bought from a Marine in the Philippines during WW2, my uncle was on an escort carrier and was in port there. This rifle was taken from the Japanese some how or another. After the war he put the J C Higgins scope on that rifle by tack welding a scope mount on it! It is chambered in 7.62mm Russian.

So the first thing I did when I bought his guns was take all those OLD scopes off and go back to using the iron sights. The J C Higgins is identical to the the Weaver 330.

It was so funny, my uncle's gun education ended about 1946 because he still thought those were EXCELLENT scopes and thought I should ALSO hold them in REVERENCE! I like old stuff but comparing them to a good Leupold, well there is no comparison!

Thanks again,

Geoff
 

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Geoff-

Although those old Weaver sopes are not the optical equivalent of a quality modern scope, they still hold a wicked zero. I am using a couple of 50's era Weaver's on a couple of my rimfires. They aren't the brightest, and suffer a bit in poor light situations... but the fine cross hair reticles in them are worth a second look. The Weaver line was the epitome of rifle scopes during their day, for good reason. Your Uncle's feelings about his scopes probably stemmed from that fact. I used an old Weaver B-4 to shoot my first "possible"- a score of 250/250. The only other scope that has matched this feat for me was a 4-12X A/O.... sez a lot about the shootin qualities of the antique stuff.... I sure have a lot of fun with mine, and even hunt small game with them. I am well aware of their limitations, and this makes their use all that much more enjoyable for me.

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Geoff,
Nick is a bit off on his appraisal of the Weaver 330 scopes. These old Weaver 330's were purchased by the US Army for use on '03 sniper rifles. Because of this, some have government markings, and some are just early commercial with military serial numbers added with an engraver. All of the 330's are highly sought after by military collectors, just because they can be used correctly on a Springfield '03.
There were two generations of 330's that were made. The first had a metal tab that rested on the adjustment knobs, for the click tension, and a second that did it internally. The earlier of the two was used as issued on the '03, while the later style would have a US Property marking on it.
I see these go for $100-$200 to collectors, depending on condition. The military property marked ones of course are in the upper range of these prices.
Hope this helps.
 

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mm93 and Doc Sharptail,

Once again I am learning all sorts of things from you all. My Weaver 330 must be late civilian models as they have no US markings or serial numbers as far as I can tell and also no click adjusters. One is fine cross hair another a heavier crosshair and the other is a post reticle.

So the last year they were made was 1947? That must be about right considering the guns were made right about this same time frame.

You're probably right Doc Sharptail that I shouldn't be so hard on these old scopes. Geez they are approaching 60 years old. I didn't have any idea just how old they were.

I also had no idea that this was the model scope used by the US army on their 03 sniper rifles.

By the way, my uncle was a machinegunner on one of the 2 man fighters that took off from the carrier he was on. I forget what model aircraft it was. He also gave me his navy uniform along with a piece of Japanese money with the date of the surrender on the USS Missouri in Tokyo bay written on it. On the day of the surrender my uncles ship was anchored close enough to the Missouri that he had a pretty good view of the proceedings.

Thanks again for the help!

Geoff
 

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Hi Val-

Nick Stroebel's scope book was published in 2000- likely the manuscript was accepted and approved in late '98 or early '99. His data is likely at least 5 years old now- possibly older. Unfortunately, I think his book is the only working reference on old scopes available at this time- I have not seen or heard of any other works of this type. He does briefly cover the military use of the 330 scopes in his short synopsis of the Weaver Co. The first military use of the 330-C (M-73B1) was on the 1903-A4 Sniper rifle. The military version of the 330 had "increased weather-proofing" compared to the civilian model....

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes Doc, you're about right. I have emailed Nick over the years, even before he came out with his scope book. It's the only treatise on old scopes that I know of. Unfortunately in the rush to get it to press, it does lack a good bit of info. Still it's the only real source, so it's better than what we had before!
With my computer crash last year, I lost my email addresses, and have not been able to reach Nick since then! Wish I knew someone who still had his current email address! He was a wealth of knowledge on these old scopes, and sights, and I often relied on his expertise when I drew a blank!
 
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