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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read and researched and have conflicting information.

Several accounts of people NEVER cleaning the barrel or gun. Can't go that route. Conscience and training say that is a no no.

When cleaning the barrel can you or do you not use a .22 cal cleaning brush ? I have read "yes" and also "no".

Research says use "NO" Solvents just oil to clean in conjunction with pads. I have also read 2 or 3 references to using WD40 as the cleaning fluid for the barrels.

Need some guidance here ... What is the proper procedure ?
 

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I have always used a brass brush with Hoppes #9 solvent. Then I run a few patches down the barrel with solvent,
Then a few patches with oil I use rem oil a lot of others 3in1 machine type oil.
I also always wipe the barrel and any where I touch with a slightly damp large patch with solvent and the wipe down with oil on a silicone reel cloth.
I never got any rust on my guns with this method.
Others will and have different methods. I was always taught clean your guns after each use and every now and then for good measure.
If a brass brush is not your thing go get a new bore snake system and use that. But cleaning your gun will make the finish last longer and keep rust at bay.
 

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I have always used a brass brush with Hoppes #9 solvent. Then I run a few patches down the barrel with solvent,
Then a few patches with oil I use rem oil a lot of others 3in1 machine type oil.
I also always wipe the barrel and any where I touch with a slightly damp large patch with solvent and the wipe down with oil on a silicone reel cloth.
I never got any rust on my guns with this method.
Others will and have different methods. I was always taught clean your guns after each use and every now and then for good measure.
If a brass brush is not your thing go get a new bore snake system and use that. But cleaning your gun will make the finish last longer and keep rust at bay.
This is pretty much the routine I use, too. I wipe metal parts down with a chamois with a commercially available product called Rusteprufe and if I'm storing the gun for a while in the safe I put it in a silicon gun sock.
I don't use WD 40 on firerarms ever.
 

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I agree. I have read recently of folks who say they never clean a gun. I can't imagine that. I clean mine after every shooting session. I run a really wet patch of cleaner through and let it set a few minutes. Then follow that with a brass brush for several passes. Next a couple of dry patches to remove the solvent and finish up with oil patches until they come out clean. Finally, I rub down the outside with an oiled patch then wipe off as much of that as practical with a clean dry rag. I don't think you can beat the old standby, Hoppes solvent and oil. Another cleaner, Butch's Bore Shine was highly recommended so I bought a bottle to try. It seems to work all right but I can't really say I see any improvement over Hoppes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So what I am hearing is that you go through basically the same procedures with the Air Rifle as you do with any weapon.

I am not anal but the guns do get cleaned after use. Do maintenance cleaning but that does not come into play often. Most every gun I have makes it "out of the closet" to the range on a regular basis so they get cleaned.

The Umarex website videos say no petroleum based products and no solvents. Hoppes seems to be the mainstream product to use for cleaning.

So it will be Hoppes, .22 caliber brass brush, swab plugs / patches and a rod.

Another concern put somewhat to rest.

Thanks ....
 

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Don't want to get a petroluim based product into the piston chamber, of a powerfull springer air rifle, can lead to "dieseling" which can damage the mechanism.
 

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I presume you're talking about air rifles here?

Remember there is no powder residue, no copper streaking in barrel. The pellets are soft lead, not hardened. All pellet rifles shoot at slower velocities than where we begin to see significant leading in powder rifles. They just don't get as dirty as powder rifles, smokeless or black.

That being said, there are felt cleaning pellets available that can be shot through the barrel to clean it. I've never used these, but they could be used with a small amount of solvent, but since the pellets are soft lead, the felt should be abrasive enough to clean out the grooves. Scrubbing with a brass (bronze) brush should not be necessary. Some barrels are even made out of brass and would be damaged by any wire or nylon brushes.

The point of "dieseling" is well made. Any volatile lubricant or solvent used in the barrel or the cylinder could undergo combustion during the sudden compression of firing the gun. This could damage the mechanism or the barrel.

I don't clean my air rifles. Never have. They just don't seem to get dirty, and the accuracy doesn't suffer.

I will add that I ruined the seals of my Benjamin by putting an oil into the pump chamber.
 
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rjt,
The fat part of the barrel is some type of noise supressor and something sticks up from the bottom of the inside of the barrel. If you look down the barrel you can't see through it. A guy on You tube sticks a plastic drinking straw down the muzzle end of the barrel, which in some way depresses that thing. He then passes a doubled over loop of mono fishing line through the straw and down the barrel, attaches a patch through the fishing line loop and pulls it through the barrel. Do a search on You Tube for cleaning air rifle barrels.

Hip
 

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I agree. I have read recently of folks who say they never clean a gun. I can't imagine that. I clean mine after every shooting session. I run a really wet patch of cleaner through and let it set a few minutes. Then follow that with a brass brush for several passes. Next a couple of dry patches to remove the solvent and finish up with oil patches until they come out clean. Finally, I rub down the outside with an oiled patch then wipe off as much of that as practical with a clean dry rag. I don't think you can beat the old standby, Hoppes solvent and oil. Another cleaner, Butch's Bore Shine was highly recommended so I bought a bottle to try. It seems to work all right but I can't really say I see any improvement over Hoppes.
Notice enfo runs a wet patch through the barrel before using a brush. I would never run the brush through a dry barrel. Get some lube or cleaner of some kind in there first. JMHO
 

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well having shot air rifles for over 6 years i do clean the barrel with a pull through and a patch with ballistol on it then i use two of the felt tips to clear(maybe once a year).this has never helped accuracy though in any of my air rifles.have had 15 in total.only ones that seem to need it are the top end £1400 plus rifles like daystate,anshutz,steyr.the usual wipe down after every use with ballistol on a clean cloth and that is it.i use ballistol as you can use it on the stock also so you do not need to worry about that
 

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I have read on airgun sites of using Goo Gone as a solvent. It isn't petroleum based but rather citrus. Little down the tube and then the felt shoot though patch. I am no expert but have read some on the subject and believe any oil in a springer is a bad thing.
 

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I use felt cleaning pads with an ammonia based "anti-fouling" (lead/copper) solvent, then Hoppes, a dry one or two, then oil, another dry one. Without digging them out, I think they're Beeman's, but you just stick them in like a pellet and shoot it through. They've worked pretty well for me.
 
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