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Discussion Starter #1
These biscuits I got from a friend's cook book which is for outdoor over the fire cooking. I did it in my own oven at 425F for the same cooking time uncovered in a cast iron skillet and it came out great. These are so soft and easy to make. I'd definitely recommend. Feel free to cook it outside in a Dutch oven as well.
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
What we need now is a fantastic sausage gravy recipe!
Thanks for sharing!
Andrew
I have a sausage gravy recipe, but I fear I am a cook by feel more than recipes most times. Here is mine to best i can figure in approx measurements

1 12 oz log of either Jimmy dean,Jones or any raw breakfast sausage of your choice ( can even do half bacon half sausage)
Cook in skillet until browned and fat has rendered out.
Add about 1/4 cup flour to sausage and stir over heat until dry and ready for some much needed liquid (about 1 min).
Add about... 4 to 5 cups whole milk. Cook on high heat constantly stirring until thickened. I like A LOT of course black pepper so I add that while it is simmering and sometimes smoked paprika, tobasco or cayenne for kick. Should be enough for this recipe of biscuits depending how smothered you like them .

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I have a sausage gravy recipe, but I fear I am a cook by feel more than recipes most times. Here is mine to best i can figure in approx measurements

1 12 oz log of either Jimmy dean,Jones or any raw breakfast sausage of your choice ( can even do half bacon half sausage)
Cook in skillet until browned and fat has rendered out.
Add about 1/4 cup flour to sausage and stir over heat until dry and ready for some much needed liquid (about 1 min).
Add about... 4 to 5 cups whole milk. Cook on high heat constantly stirring until thickened. I like A LOT of course black pepper so I add that while it is simmering and sometimes smoked paprika, tobasco or cayenne for kick. Should be enough for this recipe of biscuits depending how smothered you like them .
That sounds good!
Andrew
 

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Yummmmmmm! Sounds good, especially with the gravy!

Have recently and FINALLY gotten a sourdough starter going and have made bread loaves once and pancakes once. Think to day is a bread day. Both good, but especially the pancakes!

Wish I had some of those biscuits AND GRAVY for breakfast!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
What we need now is a fantastic sausage gravy recipe!
Thanks for sharing!
Andrew
I have a sausage gravy recipe, but I fear I am a cook by feel more than recipes most times. Here is mine to best i can figure in approx measurements

1 12 oz log of either Jimmy dean,Jones or any raw breakfast sausage of your choice ( can even do half bacon half sausage)
Cook in skillet until browned and fat has rendered out.
Add about 1/4 cup flour to sausage and heat until dry.
Add about... 4 to 5 cups whole milk. Cook on high heat constantly stirring until thickened. I like A LOT of course black pepper so I add that while it is simmering and sometimes smoked paprika, tobasco or cayenne for kick. Should be enough for this recipe of biscuits depending how smothered you like them .
20200525_125620.jpg
 

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Or, what would be great are those biscuits with home made cracklings! Now, not talking fried pig skin which is sometimes called cracklings, but the lean meat that is left over after the rendering of pig lard.

For those of us that no longer butcher, a good place to start is buy some fresh ground BUT UN-SEASONED sausage. Then slowly so as to not scorch render the fat out until the meat is just nicely browned.

Then strain out as much of the lard as possible. At this point, the cracklings can be cooked for eating or frozen for later use.

When ready to eat, place the cracklings in a skillet, heat and drain any additional grease off, then add milk, salt and pepper to taste and allow the liquid to reduce until the mix is a thin gravy consistency.

Oh so good over biscuits, or toast.

Really good to have apple sauce as a side!

My dad used to say that he thought his family saved everything but the squeal from the hogs, but that mom's family even saved the squeal.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Or, what would be great are those biscuits with home made cracklings! Now, not talking fried pig skin which is sometimes called cracklings, but the lean meat that is left over after the rendering of pig lard.

For those of us that no longer butcher, a good place to start is buy some fresh ground BUT UN-SEASONED sausage. Then slowly so as to not scorch render the fat out until the meat is just nicely browned.

Then strain out as much of the lard as possible. At this point, the cracklings can be cooked for eating or frozen for later use.

When ready to eat, place the cracklings in a skillet, heat and drain any additional grease off, then add milk, salt and pepper to taste and allow the liquid to reduce until the mix is a thin gravy consistency.

Oh so good over biscuits, or toast.

Really good to have apple sauce as a side!

My dad used to say that he thought his family saved everything but the squeal from the hogs, but that mom's family even saved the squeal.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
Not gonna lie. I have made biscuits with bacon fat and lard before. It is really tasty.
 

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My wife uses lard in her pie crust, everyone thinks she makes the best pies around.
 

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For sausage gravy I just substitute my favorite ground sausage for the hamburger in the SOS recipe:

The Official USMC Recipe for SOS - from the USMC Recipe Manual, NAVMC 1067-SD, circa 1952
(Quantities reduced to serve two Seabees, or US Marines).


1 ¼ pounds ground beef
3 ¼ tablespoons chopped onions
3 ¼ tablespoons of bacon fat, lard or butter. (Crisco may only be substited for children below the age of 12, women, Yale and Harvard grads).
4 ¾ tablespoons flour
1 ½ cups evaporated milk
1 ½ cups beef stock for milk
Salt to taste
Black pepper to taste
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (optional)

Cook meat in its own fat until brown, stirring frequently. Cook onions in bacon fat, add flour and blend thoroughly. Mix milk and beef stock and heat. Add hot milk mixture to fat and flour mixture. Heat to boiling point; boil one (1) minute, stirring constantly. Add salt, MSG and pepper. Pour sauce over meat. Simmer until meat is well done, but not overcooked. Serve over toast points or biscuits.

Note: If you’ve been wondering why you just can’t get your SOS to taste like it did in the “Old Corps”, look to your beef stock for the answer. Make a rich stock from beef bones per the procedure of that time, and then carefully follow this recipe for a true reproduction of that Old Corps SOS.

Leatherneck’s World-Famous SOS Recipe

1 ½ pounds extra lean hamburger or ground chuck
2 tablespoons oleo (Yuck~!) lard, or butter
1 cup chopped onion
3 tablespoons flour
2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 tablespoons soy sauce (or less to taste)
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 cups milk
Salt and pepper to taste
Sliced bread

Brown the meat, then drain. Add oleo. Stir in the onions and cook until you can see through them. Add flour, stir and cook two to three minutes. Add garlic, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce and mix thoroughly. Add milk and stir until it thickens. Serve over bread.

Headquarters Marine Corps “Red” Version of SOS (Tomato Based). Feeds 100.

Minced Beef

20pounds beef patty mix, bulk or beef ground, thawed
1 ½ quarts onion, dry, chopped
7 ½ cups flour, wheat, general purpose, sifted
2 ¼ gallons tomatoes, canned, crushed
2 tablespoons mace, ground or nutmeg ground (optional)
2 tablespoons salt
2 teaspoons pepper, black

Cook beef with onions in its own fat until beef loses its pink color, stirring to break apart. Drain or skim off excess fat. Sprinkle flour over beef; continue cooking until flour is absorbed. Add tomatoes, mace or nutmeg, salt and pepper. Stir well. Simmer 10 — 15 minutes. Serve over toast, biscuits, rice or pasta.

Nutritional values per 5-ounce serving: Calories 333; protein 16.9 grams; fat 24.3 grams; carbohydrates 11 grams; cholesterol 77 milligrams.

Courtesy of:

Sgt. Tom Dunne, U.S.M.C.
1967 — 1973
 

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Used to have biscuits fried in a cast iron skillet over a camp fire. Basically any good biscuit recipe and fry them in butter or shortening. Living close to Native communities see a bit of fry bread around. Fry bread tacos are much better than the the ones using the shells. They deep fry the batter but one can use a skillet and less grease. Although frying up a batch of bacon and then frying the biscuits in hte grease is not all bad. Some use the sausage grease.

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Tried the biscuits fry bread with Tacos but need to experiment more. I know some used frozen bread dough and broke it up into chunks after they let it rise a bit for tacos;
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