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Some say "edge packing" doesn't really exist...describe it as a myth. Some say the benefits gained are steel type related at best. For me I know forging a blade just feels a bit more personal. Any better results then stock removal...I don't really know.
 

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..The jury is still out for me as to edge packing, although most of the more prolific blade forgers than I am, claim it is of no effect..
I prefer forging since I can so easily use "found" steels..for instance, stock removal would be a challenge with a coil spring or a RR spike..
Living in "farm country", I like to use pieces of old farm machinery.
I especially like to make a blade for someone using a piece of a favorite old tool or car/truck that they used for years...but is now in the scrap heap...that way their treasured old machine " lives on " with them...
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Please excuse my ignorance....but what is edge packing?

Safe shooting (and cutting)

Limey
 

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Please excuse said:
Please excuse my ignorance....but what is edge packing?

Safe shooting (and cutting)

Limey
It is basically a part of the forging of the blade. Some believe in hammering the edge to pack the metal. I said basically! :wink: Sorta like the Ford vs Cheby arguement if you know what I mean.

Dave 8)
 

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For most smiths it means forging the blade in the normal manner, but concentrating upon the edge by striking the edge with blows arranged in a triangular pattern...say 3/16 " apart...theoretically "packing" the steel toward the edge...

As VTDW said, it is somewhat a bladesmith's Ford/Chevy argument...
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Question:

I thought the whole thing about forging a blade was to fold over the metal at least a couple of times (like the bladesmiths of Japan) to increase its strength and to hold its edge.
If in forging all you're doing is moving thick metal to thin it out at the edge, and lengthen the blade, then I don't see much difference between a grinder and a hammer except for the time and heat???
Please explain.
Thanks
:?: :?: :?:
 

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Guest;
The folding process is what they refer to today as damascus..re-developed ( I believe) by the late Bill Moran.
Folding of the steel does many things, not the least of which is developing a "pattern" often referred to as " pattern welding ". Upon being ground a definite pattern is displayed, often enhanced by acid etching..
As for the difference between forging and stock removal; both honest ways of making a knife..I do both..
I am # 1 ... a blacksmith and I most often make blades from " found " steel . Some of my favorite materials are sections of coil springs, worn out files, roller bearing cups or even the ball bearings themselves ( if I can find them large enough)...some folks are forging knives from several ball bearings with iron powder sealed in a steel box container.

( hopefully another blade forger can post a pic here...)

All these things would be difficult or impossible to do with only stock removal...

I also like to " differentially " harden my blades..easier to do at the forge..
 
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