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Okay so I got my 336 a few weeks ago and I just now decided to clean it and no, I unfortunatly havent been able to fire it yet. so Here is how I clean it:

1. take lever, bolt, and ejector out
2. run a dry patch through the barrel
3. take a bore brush and run that through the barrel a few times
4. get a patch wet with solvent and put it through
5. repeat step four (2x)
6. let it solvent work
7. clean/oil the bolt, ejector, lever and all the other parts inside the reciever I can reach.
8. run a few dry patchs down the barrel, if its really dirty I repeat step 3 and 4ake
9. after the barrel is dry of solvent, I get a patch wet with rem oil and run that down the barrel
10. put ejector, bolt, and lever back in.
11. Take my oilly rag (it has a mixture of rem oil, ottis gun oil, I just added whatever oil I have at the time if it seems dry) and wipe all the outer metal parts. then I take a regular dry gun rag and wipe the wood if it has any oil/solvent on it.
12. do a function check and inspect it.


Is this all that I need to do? and The solvents I use are remington brite bore and ottis gun solvent ( got both in a cheap cleaning kit) I plan on switching to hoppes #9 solvent because of all the good reviews of it, But I cant find it at my sporting goods store.... ( mills fleet farm). so what do you folks think?
 

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That is what I do to my Marlin's. However I don't run the brush through when the barrel is dry, I run solvent through with some patches or put a few drops down the barrel before I put the brush through.

I use Hoppes #9 its great stuff. Their cleaning products are good in my books.

Don't be afraid to fire it. I have done the above and its worked for me.

One thing I would like to learn how to do is take the bolt apart.
 

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Hoppes #9

I am a Huge fan of Hoppes #9, but I use the Benchrest Hoppes #9 for the barrel as the regular Hoppes doesnt cut the copper fouling. The benchrest #9 is not seriously harsh on the barrels either like some other copper cutting brands.
 

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sounds good, I don`t use a bore brush unless its really crusty, I don`t let it get real crusty, over cleaning will wear a barrel faster than shooting it
 

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That is what I do to my Marlin's. However I don't run the brush through when the barrel is dry, I run solvent through with some patches or put a few drops down the barrel before I put the brush through.

I use Hoppes #9 its great stuff. Their cleaning products are good in my books.

Don't be afraid to fire it. I have done the above and its worked for me.

One thing I would like to learn how to do is take the bolt apart.
**************************************************************************************************

Here's a link for bolt disassembly.
http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/how-disassemble-clean/21437-marlin-bolt-disassembly.html
 

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On taking the bolt apart, there is a post here that describes it with needle nose and a vise. I used two pieces of 1x8" wood, a c-clamp, and some needle nose vice grips to remove the extractor. I didn't have a vice. I clamped the bolt between the wood with the extractor end pointing out. I set the vice grips to the correct size to catch the extractor and pushed it off towards the floor. This worked good. I'd wear some safety glasses or you might get hit in the eye with flying parts. I think the firing pin comes out after removing a cross pin.
 

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sounds good, I don`t use a bore brush unless its really crusty, I don`t let it get real crusty, over cleaning will wear a barrel faster than shooting it
I was not aware of it wearing a barrel faster than shooting it... I guess I should stick to using more patches than using the brush.

Thanks, learned something new!
 

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I guess two things can be added: Don't clean the barrel from the muzzle-end, if at all possible, so you don't nick the crown. Always from the breach. And don't oil the firing pin or inside the bolt, so the congealed oil and schmutz won't impeed its travel.
 

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RuralMinnesota, my wife still thinks Hoppe's 9 is my after shave. I'm not going to tell any different. Y'all take care, John.
 

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I'm more inclined to do step 4 before step 2. I only run a dry patch down the bore to get the solvent and other contaminates out of the bore. I also think you should put solvent on the bore brush. But that is jist my opinion.
 

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I'm more inclined to do step 4 before step 2. I only run a dry patch down the bore to get the solvent and other contaminates out of the bore. I also think you should put solvent on the bore brush. But that is jist my opinion.
I totally agree with this. I wouldn't run a dry brush through. It probably won't hurt, but I don't think it will help, either.
 

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I am a Huge fan of Hoppes #9, but I use the Benchrest Hoppes #9 for the barrel as the regular Hoppes doesnt cut the copper fouling. The benchrest #9 is not seriously harsh on the barrels either like some other copper cutting brands.
I have found that if I want to remove copper fouling from the barrel using regular Hoppes #9, that after a cleaning routine of swabbing to remove powder residue, and fouling from a shooting session, to run a wet patch of #9 thru the bore, and then let it set overnight. Next day run a dry patch thru, and it will be blue/green. I will usually repeat this process again. I have found this keeps copper fouling buildup to a minimum in my barrels.
 

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I fired my Marlin 60 for years and never cleaned it. Finally did one day, and it was no mote dirty then guns I clean regularly. So what you use, the order in which you use them matters little. If all you ever did was oil it you would be fine, just to counter rust due to moisture.
 

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I have found that if I want to remove copper fouling from the barrel using regular Hoppes #9, that after a cleaning routine of swabbing to remove powder residue, and fouling from a shooting session, to run a wet patch of #9 thru the bore, and then let it set overnight. Next day run a dry patch thru, and it will be blue/green. I will usually repeat this process again. I have found this keeps copper fouling buildup to a minimum in my barrels.
Actually, if you're on the run, Hoppe's No.9 is one of the few that can or should be left in the bore for more than a few hours. Some solvents even less.

Over time, I've pretty much stopped using brushes except for leading. On new barrels I use Remington 40X for the first few trips to the range. It removes rough spots quickly, without resorting to bore lapping, which I avoid if possible. When the bore smooths out, Hoppe's Bench Rest for a couple passes on a cotton patch, followed by a round of No.9 usually removes the copper fouling completely.

Cleaning a bore has as many options as there are shooters. One of the best features of the 336 is the ease of pulling the bolt to clean from the breech. For barrels inaccessable from the rear, I draw a series of patches through with 150lb test fishing line. I resort to cleaning from the muzzle only when I have a bore guide.
 

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The only thing I might add is, IF it is a new from the factory gun, I'd take the innards out of the receiver and give 'em a good cleaning. You just may find some sticky oil left from machining and maybe some metal filings. My GG had no filings, but the oil the factory left was like a light coat of honey.
 

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The only thing I do to clean the bore is I run a bore snake with Hoppe's #9 through it one time after each trip to the range.
 

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A few comments.

I start with Hoppes #9 but progress to real copper removers after I get the powder residue removed.

I see nothing on your list to remove copper fouling. If you are shooting copper jacketed bullets you will build up copper fouling and that will affect your accuracy. Many gun owners have no idea about copper fouling. It is a real issue even with Marlins.

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&gs_nf=....,cf.osb&fp=91b535230a0896c1&biw=1350&bih=684

copper fouling - Google Search


I have found that the larger bores don't foul as bad as the smaller ones but the 35 Rem, 30-30, 357 all foul pretty good. I use two products for copper fouling. Montana Bore Extreme Copper Killer and Bore Tech Copper Eliminator.

http://www.montanaxtreme.com/products/?id=4&product=CopperKiller

http://boretech.com/products/eliminator.shtml

There is nothing wrong with plastic or brass brushes they will not wear the barrel. Steel brushes are not good.
 

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I cleaned mine for the first time about 15 minutes ago. Well... turns out the rod from my old Outers .22 cal cleaning kit does not have 8-32 threads like the jag I have for my .30-30 does, so I just used the old .22 kit with a slotted end. Put a patch in it soaked with some Hoppe's No.9 (love the smell) and ran it through. Followed that up with a few dry patches until they came out clean. Put a very like coat of Rem Oil on the bolt and put it all back together. To my surprise, it cycles even smoother than it did before. It only has about 30 shots through it.
 
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