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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was watching this show last night. A trooper had to go on a stranded hiker call after dark. His rifle of choice looked like a 1895 SBL. Did anyone catch this show last night?
 

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Re: Alasks State Troopers Show

I was all set to watch it but at the last minute I was unable to. And now I find out that one of my favorite guns made an appearance... ::)
 

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Re: Alasks State Troopers Show

Bummer, I missed that one too, one of my favorite shows.
 

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Re: Alasks State Troopers Show

Yes! With ghost ring sights and big loop lever. Said he feels better carrying it when he has to go into an area that has high bear traffic. Love that show.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Re: Alasks State Troopers Show

If I was younger and my roots weren't so deep here in Kansas I'd be there in a heartbeat. But thats what I get for knowing everything when I was 18 years old 30 some years ago. This show is one I try to catch evey sunday. Was switching back and forth between it and the b-ball game last night. ROCK CHALK JAYHAWK KU.
 

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Re: Alasks State Troopers Show

Yes I was just getting on to post the same thing but wasn't sure what model it was with rail,biglever,laminate stocks and full mag tube.It was a cool mix of new and old with a lever gun on a troopers back wearing body armor and an auto pistol on his side.
 

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Re: Alasks State Troopers Show

Go AST go! Troopers with 45/70 leverguns, how awesome is that.. :D ;D
 

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Re: Alasks State Troopers Show

Yep, Cool show! I got to remember to set it for DVR.
 

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karabo said:
As soon as he pulled out that rifle, I knew it was a Marlin. That show has made me want to visit Alaska in a bad way.
Now there's the voice of reason. :)

Having lived in mainland Alaska, and having dreamed of it for a good long while before finally going, all I can say is this, some places are best visited before committing to them. It's a great place for sure, but there's a whole lot you don't know, understand, or realize until you go there.

I loved my time up there and am glad for those ~5yrs but I wouldn't move back there for nothing. ;) Visit yes, live, no thanks.

Incidentally, speaking of AST, if you aren't aware, they are the "game wardens" of the state. Unlike most CONUS, Alaska doesn't have a separate enforcement division for wildlife. The AST handles it and while all of them have the responsibility, they also have specialized units for the task.

Oh and uh, getting caught violating a game law in AK is a very bad idea. :eek:
 

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Eli Chaps said:
Having lived in mainland Alaska, and having dreamed of it for a good long while before finally going, all I can say is this, some places are best visited before committing to them. It's a great place for sure, but there's a whole lot you don't know, understand, or realize until you go there.

I loved my time up there and am glad for those ~5yrs but I wouldn't move back there for nothing. ;) Visit yes, live, no thanks.
It is interesting that you have mentioned this about AK every so often, usually around someone thinking of moving here, and I do have to admit it is probably good advice to visit first before committing to living here, but the same could be said for WA, MT, or anywhere else. The thing that makes it more pertinent with AK is the distance and expense of moving here, and then once here, if you can't find a job, the true definition of a sourdough comes into play, that being "sour on the land and not enough dough to leave". There are more than a few homeless people here who once just moved up on a whim, maybe thinking they could find work, went bust and never got it together to get out. I don't know which areas you lived in during your time here, I have heard you mention the Susitna drainage so I will assume it was south central which is where most first go. It is where over half of AK lives, in a hundred mile strip. It is also an area that can be difficult to escape from, that is get out into the wilderness even though it is out there all around, it takes sometimes a sizable investment in "toys" to get to it. A 4 wheel drive truck just aint it.

I was born up here and it will be 56 years this spring, worked all over the state, flown and boated over it, but when I look at a map I am still daunted by all the places I haven't ever been. In 56 years, I have probably seen only about 10 or 15% of it, and a lot of that was from growing up in a family of pilots and float planes. It is a very different place from anywhere I have ever visited in the lower 48. The one big one is there are hardly any roads, and that makes activities like hunting a challenge. Where I live now I can go boating the inside passage for hundreds of miles, exploring thousands of islands, but gas is expensive, hunting season the weather shifts and you take your live in your hands with a small boat and the storms that come out of nowhere.

Anyone wanting to move here should realize that you can't just go live in one area, like Anchorage or Fairbanks, and figure you have "done AK". That would be like someone from overseas saying they have done the USA by living in NYC or Denver or San Diego. Being over 3000 miles wide and 1200 miles high the place is just too big and too diverse. Where one area might not have been it (I for one could never live in Anchorage or the surrounding area), other places might work well. But AK isn't for everyone, but it is a difficult place to figure that out by just checking out one geographical area or hearing second hand stories of woe. The climate for one is extreme, from places where it might not get cold enough for snow to stick all winter, to months and months of extreme cold and darkness, seemingly endless mountains, or flat as Kansas, thousands of sq miles of wetlands, or thousands of islands, and 2/3rds of the entire US coastline, all in one state.

Don't let the experiences of any one dissuade or persuade you on moving here. You have to come and check it out for yourself. It aint for everyone, but I for one cannot see myself living anywhere else!
 

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eaglesnest said:
It is interesting that you have mentioned this about AK every so often, usually around someone thinking of moving here, and I do have to admit it is probably good advice to visit first before committing to living here, but the same could be said for WA, MT, or anywhere else. The thing that makes it more pertinent with AK is the distance and expense of moving here, and then once here, if you can't find a job, the true definition of a sourdough comes into play, that being "sour on the land and not enough dough to leave". There are more than a few homeless people here who once just moved up on a whim, maybe thinking they could find work, went bust and never got it together to get out. I don't know which areas you lived in during your time here, I have heard you mention the Susitna drainage so I will assume it was south central which is where most first go. It is where over half of AK lives, in a hundred mile strip. It is also an area that can be difficult to escape from, that is get out into the wilderness even though it is out there all around, it takes sometimes a sizable investment in "toys" to get to it. A 4 wheel drive truck just aint it.

I was born up here and it will be 56 years this spring, worked all over the state, flown and boated over it, but when I look at a map I am still daunted by all the places I haven't ever been. In 56 years, I have probably seen only about 10 or 15% of it, and a lot of that was from growing up in a family of pilots and float planes. It is a very different place from anywhere I have ever visited in the lower 48. The one big one is there are hardly any roads, and that makes activities like hunting a challenge. Where I live now I can go boating the inside passage for hundreds of miles, exploring thousands of islands, but gas is expensive, hunting season the weather shifts and you take your live in your hands with a small boat and the storms that come out of nowhere.

Anyone wanting to move here should realize that you can't just go live in one area, like Anchorage or Fairbanks, and figure you have "done AK". That would be like someone from overseas saying they have done the USA by living in NYC or Denver or San Diego. Being over 3000 miles wide and 1200 miles high the place is just too big and too diverse. Where one area might not have been it (I for one could never live in Anchorage or the surrounding area), other places might work well. But AK isn't for everyone, but it is a difficult place to figure that out by just checking out one geographical area or hearing second hand stories of woe. The climate for one is extreme, from places where it might not get cold enough for snow to stick all winter, to months and months of extreme cold and darkness, seemingly endless mountains, or flat as Kansas, thousands of sq miles of wetlands, or thousands of islands, and 2/3rds of the entire US coastline, all in one state.

Don't let the experiences of any one dissuade or persuade you on moving here. You have to come and check it out for yourself. It aint for everyone, but I for one cannot see myself living anywhere else!
Yessir you are absolutely correct and I sure don't mean any disrespect to Alaska or thems that live there. It is a beautiful place and just like any other place, for those inclined it is the perfect place to live.

Maybe I need to do a better job of explaining myself when I say those things Eagle. I just mean to say that so many people see Alaska as an absolute paradise that they may not realize some of the trade offs that come with it. And make no mistake, I tell everyone they should make a trip to Alaska at least once in their lives.

I sure didn't mean to come off as offensive buddy, and if I did, I apologize. As I said, I very much enjoyed my time up there and had many great experiences.

FWIW, I've been in 28 states and a few continents, and I wouldn't want to live most of those places either. Maybe I'm just and set in my ways. ;) ;D
 

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Eli Chaps said:
Yessir you are absolutely correct and I sure don't mean any disrespect to Alaska or thems that live there. It is a beautiful place and just like any other place, for those inclined it is the perfect place to live.

Maybe I need to do a better job of explaining myself when I say those things Eagle. I just mean to say that so many people see Alaska as an absolute paradise that they may not realize some of the trade offs that come with it. And make no mistake, I tell everyone they should make a trip to Alaska at least once in their lives.

I sure didn't mean to come off as offensive buddy, and if I did, I apologize. As I said, I very much enjoyed my time up there and had many great experiences.

FWIW, I've been in 28 states and a few continents, and I wouldn't want to live most of those places either. Maybe I'm just and set in my ways. ;) ;D
No offence taken Erik. Actually I am in agreement with you, just was pointing out that Alaska is a place that is difficult to get a handle on just how big it is with no road system for probably 7/8ths of the state area. We have 4 natural timezones (even though we consolidated them to 2 by statute). And we do have problems. Energy costs in many places are out of this world expensive for one. If it were paradise we wouldn't have the highest suicide rates and alcoholism rates in the country. But those things are peoples choices, why they fall into such despair with so much raw beauty is a mystery to me. And as for the State Troopers being a dream job, I think most people would think twice about it if they knew how tough a job much of it is. I sure wouldn't want it, dealing with domestic disputes in villages where the only way in is to fly and there may not be any back up and the like. My hat does go off to them however.
But for some, it is one of the last vestiges of the way things used to be, and that is for better and for worse, because those pioneers who drug wagons across the west didn't have it easy either! Maybe we are spoiled.. I can live with that. ;D
 

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The problem is that too many people just see the romance in some of these things. Once you get past that they find out that the real world can be a scary place. Today I would love to visit Alaska to hunt and fish and vacation. 40 years ago I would have considered being an Alaska State Trooper, but not today. I am not young enough or tough enough for that job. A man has got to know his limitations.
 

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I pulled up and moved from rural SW OK to AK at the ripe old age of 20. Wanted to get away for a little while and see things outside of where I grew up. I couldn't think of anywhere harder to go runnin home from than Alaska. Kinda tough to get homesick and just pack up and hustle across 4500 miles and a foriegn country over the weekend. I've been here going on 5 yrs now and it has been fun. It's been tough at times but I've learned alot about alot of things.

Things like not everyone gets a moose and eats on it all winter, that went out in the 50s or 60s. There ain't a bear behind every tree, rock, and stump. Moose are increadibly dumb, except during season. The fishing is awesome, once you know what your doing, using a pole is the only resemblence it has to bass fishing. During the spring, summer, and fall all that beautiful scenery is covered with clouds of carnivorus bugs, the rest of the time it's covered with snow. The ice get thick enough to drive a truck on, shocked me as Id never seen ice thick enough to walk on growing up. And you make alot more money for the same work up here, you also spend alot more for everything but Salmon and crablegs. Salmon gets old really fast when you eat a lot of it, but for me crab hasn't yet.

All in all it's a fun place, but it does have it's downsides. One more month and th bears will be good and thawed out Yahoo!, come on May.
 

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I've lived in Alaska for 33 years on the road system in rural southcentral. If you don't like to be out in the cold (0 to -50 in winter) or don't like the mosquitos then you will not like it. If you live in anchorage it isn't a whole lot different than any northern city. If you like the outdoors and believe that there is no such thing as bad weather just bad clothes you'll do fine.
 
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