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I had a single shot 270 and it was a handful in such a light rifle. Might want to look into a Past recoil pad when shooting at the bench. Really helps tame the heaviest kicking guns.
 

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Marlin did make walnut and laminate stocks for the X7 rifles. I have a 2009 XL7 30-06 in factory walnut which does add some weight to the rifle. These stocks do show up on ebay occasionally.
 
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Excellent advice from all. Not much to add other than if you ever consider a 45-70, DON'T.
 
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FYI; XL7 Stocks as weighed on my SAGA kitchen scale. All stocks with metal TGs. Tupperware stocks have two sections of carbon arrows devconned into the forearm recesses:

1. Factory black tupperware: 1# 15 oz

2. " camo tupperware: 2# 1.5 oz

3. " walnut: 2# 8 oz

4. " laminate: 2# 15 oz

5. Boyd's LWTH w/limbsaver recoil pad: 2# 9 oz

6. " Walnut " " " : 2# 2.5 oz

7. " Pro Varmint " " " : 3# 2 oz

8. " At-One w/Optional At-One pad: 3# 3 oz


Limbsaver makes a ambidextrous recoil reducing padded vest. I have one, works great for sighting in 3 1/2" 12ga turkey loads. $37 at Amazon, on eBay there's a used one for $16 and a new one for $34.

IMHO, Switching to a heavier stock makes a significant difference in perceived recoil. If you want to try a heavier stock I can send a Varmint Thumbhole for you to test. Mike
 

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I have a XL7 25-06 in a Boyd's walnut prairie hunter stock.
Heavier weight than the original Tupperware stock but seems to take up some recoil.
Maybe i don't even notice the recoil or I ve gotten used to it.
270 should be about the same
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Welcome from Alabama...

You don't say if you are a reloader or not... If you are not I would recommend a PAST recoil pad... I have one and I can use it for multiple rifles if I'm shooting all of my heavy hitters on the same day...
Hello! I was born and raised in Alabama. I live in Colorado now.

Currently I do not reload, yet. Not sure my wife would let me do it in the house and the garage gets bad hot in the summer. Once I figure out a good space to do it I plan on getting into reloading. Thanks for the recommendation on the recoil pad.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Welcome to Marlin Owners, the X7 Marlin in 270WIN should serve you well.

Regarding recoil, I have three suggestions since recoil is perceived differently by folks.
1. A Kick-EEZ magnum recoil pad may be enough recoil reduction, they come in grind to fit and are straight forward to install.
2. Muzzle brakes reduce recoil well, depending upon which brake, 30% to 40%
3. add both number one and two
4. Install a GraCoil recoil reduction system, choose which recoil pad to install with it. GraCoil reduces recoil between 35% to 40%, the plus being you can dial it into either factory ammunition or hand loads. But it is a more expensive route. GC15R GraCoil | GRACO Corporation


Best of luck, let us know what you decide and a range report is always appreciated.

Jack
Thanks for the solid advice. Thanks to everyone, really! I apologize I did not respond for 8 days. I wasn't getting any email notifications so I figured I wasn't getting any responses. I finally checked back today and see so many great replies to go through. So far it's looking like a recoil pad and maybe a new stock are first on my list.
 

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Thanks for the solid advice. Thanks to everyone, really! I apologize I did not respond for 8 days. I wasn't getting any email notifications so I figured I wasn't getting any responses. I finally checked back today and see so many great replies to go through. So far it's looking like a recoil pad and maybe a new stock are first on my list.

Good choice, weight is your friend when it comes to taming recoil. Be sure to post up some pics when finished and a range report. Folks would certainly appreciate it.

Jack
 
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Discussion Starter #29
You have not said what bullet weight you are using ? Big animals need heavy bullets in the .270 in order to penetrate. I have a Mauser .270 with a good stock and recoil pad nice rifle. If you can change the stock, job done once and for all Gar.
I'm currently using 150 grain Winchester Super X. It was cheap stuff to sight in my scope. I'm shopping for better ammo.
 

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150 grain bullets are heavy for caliber. They will thump you with more recoil than the 130s which are the standard. Recoil will be noticably less with 130s. I don't shoot factory ammo. However, when I got my first XL7 in 270, I did shoot 130 Remington Core-lokts for initial sight-in. My first actual 3 shot group shot with them at 100 yards was a 3/4" triangle. Back when they first came out, a lot of people also had success with the 130 grain blue box Federal Power Shok. You just need to find what your barrel likes. Remington also makes a 100 grain Core-lokt, plenty for deer, at 270 velocities. Hornady makes a 120 grain Custom Lite. You can go up to 150s for elk/moose if you think more bullet is necessary. I don't. A 130 grain Partition (Federal Premium) will work just fine for them too. Have fun finding out what shoots in your gun. Shouldn't be too hard. Most XL7s shoot very well. Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #32
UPDATE:

So I have my new stock installed and I tried a slip on recoil pad. I also tried it all out with a few different types of ammo.

The new stock only weighs a few ounces more than the factory stock so not much difference there. Maybe it's because I went with the cheapest option from Boyd's stocks (Spike Camp). Honestly if I had a chance to do it over I would have spent a little more and went with a more traditional stock as I'm not a huge fan of the thumb hole look. I will have to keep my eye out because I would really rather put an older solid wood one on it one day.

As for performance, first I used the same Winchester SuperX 150 grain ammo with the new stock and no added recoil pad. There was a noticeable difference from the bench. In the prone position the kick is not bad at all. When I added the recoil pad it definitely felt softer, but I really didn't like how it felt too squishy so I took it off after only a couple of shots. Where I noticed a real difference is when I changed ammo. Switching to Hornady XLD-X 145 grain with only 5 grains less was very noticeable right away. I only shot 5 rounds of this because of the cost of it, but it was enough to notice a big difference. Where things got even more interesting was when I tried Winchester Razor Boar XT 130 grain. It's like shooting a totally different rifle with this ammo. So now I know for target shooting I need to find some more 130 grain stuff.

Thank you everyone for your advice, it was all helpful in getting my rifle where I like it much better now.

On a side note, when I tighten the screw for the stock that's below the trigger guard to what feels like an appropriate torque, the bolt ends up seized and you cannot action it. If you start with the bolt out, you cannot put it in and if you start with the bolt in, you cannot pull it back. I have to loosen the screw to finger tight for things to feel right at all. For now I used some lock tight on the screw to keep things from backing out on me and it seems to be holding up just fine. I don't know if this is a design flaw with the stock or not.
820850
 

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Unfortunately there is rarely a perfectly "drop in" stock. Always a little tweaking. The wood pattern is great on that stock.
I have two of those thumb hole myself. One on a Glenfield .22 tube semi auto and another just butt stock on a 12 ga mossberg 500
I bet you will come to love the control with the thumb hole.

My XL7 2506 is in a Boyds walnut Prairie Hunter stock. I bedded the receiver and floated the barrel. 3 shots under a nickel.
These rifles seem to love a floating barrel

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On a side note, when I tighten the screw for the stock that's below the trigger guard to what feels like an appropriate torque, the bolt ends up seized and you cannot action it. If you start with the bolt out, you cannot put it in and if you start with the bolt in, you cannot pull it back. I have to loosen the screw to finger tight for things to feel right at all. For now I used some lock tight on the screw to keep things from backing out on me and it seems to be holding up just fine. I don't know if this is a design flaw with the stock or not.
The stock needs a pillar installed, to keep the screw from extending through the receiver tang. You could probably get away with putting some shims (1/4" washers) between the stock and the trigger guard. But the real fix is a pillar flush with the top of the stock, and bedding the trigger guard so it isn't stressed by the small contact patch at the bottom of the pillar.
Upgrading to a metal trigger guard wouldn't hurt, either. But the pillar would still be necessary.
 
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Your 270 is an excellent flat shooting caliber. Bullets in the 150 grn to 180 grn should be more than enough for all your hunting needs. Remember that it is basically a 30-06 shell necked down to 27 caliber---in fact you can make your own 270 cases from 30-06 shells.
 

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---in fact you can make your own 270 cases from 30-06 shells.
You can make 270 cases from 30-06 cases, however they will be shorter than minimum trim length for the 270. The 270 case has a longer neck. 2.54" max vs 2.494" max for the 30-06. Necking down a 2.494" 30-06 case will give you about a 2.501" 270 case. Safe to shoot, but can you can end up with a carbon ring forming in the gap between the end of the case and the actual end of the chamber. Bad for accuracy, very difficult to remove.
 

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Aye. Contrary to popular belief, .270 Win is not a child of .30-06.
.270 Win, .280 Rem, and .35 Whelen were all initially made using surplus .30-03 brass, which resulted in a longer neck than is possible with .30-06.

There's no point in forming .270 Win from anything else in today's world. But if you're going to do it, the best cases to use are (#1) .280 Rem and (#2) .35 Whelen.
 
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