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Hi all, new here, but not new to Marlin.

So I have my first bolt-action rifle. It is a X7 chambered in .270 Win. It had a junk scope on it so I got a Vortex CF2 4-12x44 which so far I really like.

I'm not completely sure what to think of it the rifle yet. It is very accurate, but it wow does it beat up my shoulder. Maybe I should have got a rifle chambered in 308 or something, but I already have this one and would like to see if I could tame it a little and make it work for me.

I don't hunt often and typically hunt deer when I do, but I wanted something to go elk or possibly even moose hunting one day. That is why I chose this round.

I'm looking for upgrade ideas that are not too expensive and that I should be able to install myself. I'll try to post a pic of my current setup.
 

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Hi all, new here, but not new to Marlin.

So I have my first bolt-action rifle. It is a X7 chambered in .270 Win. It had a junk scope on it so I got a Vortex CF2 4-12x44 which so far I really like.

I'm not completely sure what to think of it the rifle yet. It is very accurate, but it wow does it beat up my shoulder. Maybe I should have got a rifle chambered in 308 or something, but I already have this one and would like to see if I could tame it a little and make it work for me.

I don't hunt often and typically hunt deer when I do, but I wanted something to go elk or possibly even moose hunting one day. That is why I chose this round.

I'm looking for upgrade ideas that are not too expensive and that I should be able to install myself. I'll try to post a pic of my current setup.
bcastle,

Look up 4895 reduced loads. There is a formula that provides guidance on how to take the max load with the powder and bullet combo and reduce safely.

https://imrpowder.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/h4895-reduced-rifle-loads.pdf

https://www.hodgdon.com
 

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Welcome to Marlin Owners, the X7 Marlin in 270WIN should serve you well.

Regarding recoil, I have three suggestions since recoil is perceived differently by folks.
1. A Kick-EEZ magnum recoil pad may be enough recoil reduction, they come in grind to fit and are straight forward to install.
2. Muzzle brakes reduce recoil well, depending upon which brake, 30% to 40%
3. add both number one and two
4. Install a GraCoil recoil reduction system, choose which recoil pad to install with it. GraCoil reduces recoil between 35% to 40%, the plus being you can dial it into either factory ammunition or hand loads. But it is a more expensive route. https://graco-corp.com/product/gc15r-gracoil/


Best of luck, let us know what you decide and a range report is always appreciated.

Jack
 

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Welcome from Alabama...

You don't say if you are a reloader or not... If you are not I would recommend a PAST recoil pad... I have one and I can use it for multiple rifles if I'm shooting all of my heavy hitters on the same day...
 

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If that's the original Marlin stock, the buttpad fits inside the end a little, making it hard to replace with an aftermarket product. I put a Boyd's thumbhole stock and Kick-eez pad. Suits me fine. IMG_0357.JPG
 

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Those stocks are really light and don't do any favors in the recoil department.
You can do recoil pads like others suggest and they will work fine. I would say to either put some weight in that stock or upgrade to a better stock.
I dropped one of mine in a Boyd's stock. almost 2 lbs heavier than the factory plastic one and now I can shoot it all day from the bench with no muzzle brake or recoil pad. the one that came on mine from Boyd's is actually pretty nice and "squishy"
Dont get a 308, the 270 is milder on the recoil to begin with..
a3.JPG
 

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Those stocks are really light and don't do any favors in the recoil department.
You can do recoil pads like others suggest and they will work fine. I would say to either put some weight in that stock or upgrade to a better stock.
I dropped one of mine in a Boyd's stock. almost 2 lbs heavier than the factory plastic one and now I can shoot it all day from the bench with no muzzle brake or recoil pad. the one that came on mine from Boyd's is actually pretty nice and "squishy"
Dont get a 308, the 270 is milder on the recoil to begin with..
View attachment 814709

Nice rifle, Jason. 270?


Jack
 

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I'd leave it alone if it it shooting accurately. When hunting you won't shoot more than a few rounds. I use a 450 Bushmaster and or a 50 Beowulf for pig hunting. They both kick hard but I only use 2 rounds at most and 1 round from the 50 literally bowls 200 pounders over dead.
 

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IMHO a .270 is not a hard kicking round. That said, the .270's excellent ballistic performance comes at a cost. It is most definitely not a .223. I have three .270s including two that are pretty light. All have well designed stocks that fit me. I do not think of them as hard recoiling rifles.

Have you weighed your rifle and what loads are you using? As pointed out above, too light a rifle, a poorly designed stock or inferior recoil pad can make sighting in off a bench pretty gruesome. From the pictures of your rifle it looks like the stock is reasonably well proportioned. The recoil pad however is suspect. It is an easy way for the company to cut costs. I have a Remington 700 that came with a plastic butt plate. That's right, no pad at all. That rifle was bear to shoot off a bench. Fitting a high quality recoil pad changed everything.
 

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You have not said what bullet weight you are using ? Big animals need heavy bullets in the .270 in order to penetrate. I have a Mauser .270 with a good stock and recoil pad nice rifle. If you can change the stock, job done once and for all Gar.
 

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I have one in .270 and .308 and none of them bother me. Now an old tang safety Ruger in 7mm mag has some giddy up.
 

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Hey Castle - I own a .270. I don’t find the recoil to be bothersome (but then - that’s me shooting my particular rifle). Since in your case it IS bothersome, as you can tell you picked a great place for ideas regarding methods to mitigate the perceived recoil. The only thing I can add, since this is your first post, is a welcome to MO!
 

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plus 1 on what everybody else has said, especially the downloading! That alone can turn a even moderatly hard kicking riffle into a pop gun good enough for rabbits, or even a long day at the range. Welcome and have fun.
 

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Hi all, new here, but not new to Marlin.

So I have my first bolt-action rifle. It is a X7 chambered in .270 Win. It had a junk scope on it so I got a Vortex CF2 4-12x44 which so far I really like.

I'm not completely sure what to think of it the rifle yet. It is very accurate, but it wow does it beat up my shoulder. Maybe I should have got a rifle chambered in 308 or something, but I already have this one and would like to see if I could tame it a little and make it work for me.

I don't hunt often and typically hunt deer when I do, but I wanted something to go elk or possibly even moose hunting one day. That is why I chose this round.

I'm looking for upgrade ideas that are not too expensive and that I should be able to install myself. I'll try to post a pic of my current setup.
A 308 will not improve your recoil problem. It kicks just about the same as a .270. Remlin used to make some reduced recoil loads, called Managed Recoil ... make you should try them.?

https://www.outdoorlimited.com/rifle-ammo/270-win-ammo/remington-270-win-ammunition-managed-recoil-rl270w2-115-grain-pointed-soft-point-core-lokt-20-rounds/#:~:text=270
 

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For about $100, you can get a very nice Boyd's stock (I have the Plains Hunter model) that will add weight and reduce felt recoil. If you want to stay with the factory stock, get yourself some lead shot, like what is used in reloading shotgun shells. Fill up some Ziploc bags with the shot and use it to fill the hollow cavity in the stock. While you have the butt pad off, replace it with a better one, like a Kickeez or something similar. You can do that stuff whether or not you are a reloader. And if you reload, you can reduce your loads and move to lighter bullets that what you are currently using. Those are your realistic options. Good luck!
 

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I have owned more than a dozen X7s - most of them in .270 Win - and still have the best one, a JM.

Best recoil reduction method for a Marlin XL7 is to drop the action into a Boyd's laminate stock. (Laminate, not walnut.)
But, don't just get the basic stock. Pay the additional fee for the recoil pad (they come with hard rubber unless you upgrade). The Kick-EEZ option is usually better liked by sensitive shooters than the Pachmyr, but they're both good.

My XL7 .30-06 spent a short time in a Boyd's stock, and it gained almost THREE pounds from the change to that stock. Recoil reduction was notable, even with the basic hard pad. (I'm not recoil sensitive, so the hard pad wasn't an issue.)
I, however, wanted that rifle to be a light weight mountain rifle. So a gain of 3 lbs, for a total weight over 10 lbs, was far too much for me.

I have heard from many XL7 owners since then that the Boyds stocks do not have as much resin in them, and are not so overweight. But the remaining additional weight is still more than enough to help reduce felt recoil.



Don't put lead shot in the butt, unless it is solidly fixed in place. If it is free-floating, or just packed in with foam, it won't do anything of consequence for recoil reduction. All that will do is help the rifle balance a little better (which a wood stock will do even better).
I was not a believer in most lead shot recommendations, to begin with. But, to be sure I could put my money where my mouth was, I tried it, in about 6 different configurations, with some .270 Win XL7s (thin REP stocks) and an XL7 converted to 6.5-284 Norma (thick JM stock). Unless the shot is fixed solidly, it doesn't help with recoil. It just adds carrying weight.

I also found that the thin walls of the REP stocks tend to deform and warp if a couple pounds of shot, or shot and epoxy, are present. The thin REP stocks may also cause accuracy issues if the butt has a couple pounds of shot in it, due to that cantilevered weight flexing the stock around the action, as well as putting excess pressure on the barrel at the forward contact point(s).
Lead shot is bad, mmmkay.
 
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