Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed all of you have many years of law enforcement experience. Would you please give me your best advice.

A little about me. 2 years reserve officer at local PD
2 years jail
2 years patrol
4 years narcotics task force
2 years patrol
Last year accused of stealing. I asked to take a polygraph and cleared my name. This May 21st Sergeant, funny that :)

Would you be kind enough to help me out with some advice. I am all ears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
When in a position of leadership (I was an Army NCO for over 22 years) I would recommend the following:

Never belittle your subordinates or superiors. Don't accept that treatment from them either. (confrontation is unnecessary, just say, "let's be professional about this." never let it slide and often a smile helps break the tension)
Trust but verify.
Never cease to mentor the less experienced.
Give subordinates all the responsibility they can handle but no more than they can handle.
Be positive in everything.
Set the example.
Protect your people by adhering to the highest possible standards.

Bywords for me have been honesty, integrity, decency. My folks never failed me and I hope that I never failed them. I don't know of it if I did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good Reminders

HOBIE

Thanks so much for the reply. You make great points that many supervisors forget or never knew. I am a positive person in general so this is easy for me. I do not have a hugh ego and like to teach.

I won't forget your advise because I have a place to write them down where I will see them everyday, my PDA.

I hope to hear from others, Thanks again
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
Don't be afraid to say I don't know. If you make a promise keep it. If you need to talk to others to make a call tell them you have to check and then follow through. Make decisions based on performance not personality. Never chew them out in front of others, especially in front of members of the public.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
Re: Good Reminders

White Hunter said:
HOBIE

Thanks so much for the reply. You make great points that many supervisors forget or never knew. I am a positive person in general so this is easy for me. I do not have a hugh ego and like to teach.

I won't forget your advise because I have a place to write them down where I will see them everyday, my PDA.

I hope to hear from others, Thanks again
Very kind of you to say. Just remember to keep up with the cop specific stuff and the rest is leadership. Sure-shot is right, keep your promises. I think that not belittling people is the same as not chewing them out in front of others. And you have to accept responsibility for your decisions.

Just remember, you're in our prayers. Be safe out there. :wink:
 
G

·
White Hunter,
First of all, congratulations. Second of all it is alot easier being a patrol officer because you only have to worry about yourself and your job....Not everybody else on your watch. It will be overwhelming for a while, just follow the principals and be deliberate.
One little shread of advice would be to take an active interest in interpersonal communication. Learn the dos and don'ts of effective communication. These are just as or more important than learning the documentation process. If you are a good communicator, your work, stress, heartache and trouble will be minimal and you will promote further if you desire. Study communication skills every chance you get.
Good luck Sir :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
New Assignment

Assistant Sheriff now tells me I'm going back to Narcotics to replace our screw-up S*#tbird. :cry: We'll call when we have a replacement for you.

Sgt. position will be held for me, Watch out Dopers :twisted:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
CYA always,all dumping comes from above to a SGT's shoulders.
 
G

·
DON'T CHANGE !! By this I mean don't get an attiude like a lot of guy's do. Do you job be a leader. And finally, if your not sure about something ask.

Just my 2 Cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
When you do chew a guys ass- do it hard. Make it the exact opposite of your regular demeanor to get his attention. Then- speak no more about it unless he doesn't fix it. Just let it go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Jumping in late here......as a supervisor, you'll spend 90% of your time dealing with 10% of your subordinates. Don't let that 10% of the troops influence your attitude and demeanor toward the 90% who need little or no oversight. That bit was courtesy of Little Sister The Lieutenant, of whom I am very proud and with whom I had the great privilege of working the last year of my career.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
I am retired now, but made Detective first, all I can tell you after reading the other advise you have gotten is it is all good(the advise that is) and it is all true. One thing I can add is when you are Sgt. Crap rolls both ways and you are usually in the middle. Do not let Lts. dump on you. but in the samr vien do not dump on your subordinants. Thats about it given what the others have already said. Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Advice for a new sgt.

Some minor advice from a retired fed. Don't catch the us vs them syndrone. That is if they aren't one of us they are one of them. They, the tax payers who pay you. Try at all times to be at least civil. The job is the job is the job. Leave it at the office. Never bluff. Say what you mean and mean what you say. Get ALL the training in every area you can. Record all the training you get. Make yourself an expert with your duty weapon and pray you never need it. Keep records of all you do. If allowed, carry a micro tape recorder. Don't ever try to cover for anyone. If they aren' right, they are wrong. After a few years you will develop an internal BS detector. Make copies of all papers you handle. Reports,memos, etc.

Good luck. My prayers are with you.

Tom

:) :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,048 Posts
Re: Advice for a new sgt.

tom barthel said:
Some minor advice from a retired fed. Don't catch the us vs them syndrone. That is if they aren't one of us they are one of them. They, the tax payers who pay you. Try at all times to be at least civil. The job is the job is the job. Leave it at the office. Never bluff. Say what you mean and mean what you say. Get ALL the training in every area you can. Record all the training you get. Make yourself an expert with your duty weapon and pray you never need it. Keep records of all you do. If allowed, carry a micro tape recorder. Don't ever try to cover for anyone. If they aren' right, they are wrong. After a few years you will develop an internal BS detector. Make copies of all papers you handle. Reports,memos, etc.

Good luck. My prayers are with you.

Tom

:) :)

Yep CYA always.. The truth may hurt, but never as bad as lie or coverup..

What region in CA are you in? I used to be in LA a lot..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Area worked

Gunjunky, I started in Los Angeles, CA and transfered to Dallas, TX in 1989. In 1996 I transfered to BEP in Fort Worth, TX. A stroke retired me in 2000. I still tell everyone who will listen. "It's not the job, it's the retirement". I didn't like being in charge at all. EVERYTHING was my fault. The director's favorite comment was "why don't you know". That was one of the reasons I made my last transfer. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,048 Posts
I had met a couple of San Bernie's guys around Fontana Diner if you know the place. been long time since I was there.. but was about 98 or 99 I think,, most were good guys.. I drove for Zimmerman Truck Lines.. the big red beast.. :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Pick the best Sgt you ever worked for, you know the one.

The one the shift would say "damn glad he's is working tonight."

Mimic him, worked for me.

Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
In 1970 I was assigned to a 2000 sq mile desert probation officer position .I had one day of desert orientation meeting the various agencies.I explained my background and training to all concerned then I was introduced to the SO Sgt in charge of the office.The Sgt explained what to expect and the types of families & juvis I'd meet ,then he gave me several guided tours of the area so I'd be able to locate the residences of the clients,his help & assistance really made my job a lot less complicated & this really aided my adjustment in the area.Whenever they needed help I was always available day or night vice versa.I spent 12 years in that assignment and really enjoyed working w/o direct supervision.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top