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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got an 1894C a couple of months ago after being on Bud's Notify Me list for years. My first project was to shoot a lot of different loads over a chrono to see what I had (I've only had 38/357 handguns up to now) but encountered my first chrono failure, which took time to resolve. So I didn't get to the range until last week, but everything ended up working as it should, so I now know (for example) that I can duplicate the American Eagle (Federal) 357 Mag 158g JSP load exactly with a Speer JSP bullet, CCI magnum primers and 15.0g of AA#9 - they average 1736/1738fps over my chrono at ~12 feet (full length of the wires) and highs and lows are virtually identical too. The considerably cheaper coated lead 158g flat points were about 100fps slower at the max load of 13.4g of #9. (I tested lots of other loads at lesser charges and velocities, including Remington's version of the 38 Special +P "FBI Load" which is what i carry in snub nose revolvers - it's over 300fps faster from a rifle, with twice the muzzle energy, compared to the snubbie revolver.)

So now I switch to looking at accuracy and I'm having some trouble deciding on sights, primarily because I don't want to put a scope on this little gun. I have used peep sights on rifles since the first gun I ever fired, in 1950. I've had Lyman receiver sights on rifles since putting one on my Marlin 80-DL in 1956, and have them on my 39-A Mountie and 44 Mag 1894. But the new Lyman 66 I bought for the 1894C turns out to be an aluminum rattle trap - the slide is loose in the base both laterally (i've read that a 0.005 steel shim between base and slide may fix that) and longitudinally - it tips forward and back easily, and depends on the spring-loaded quick release button to return it to "battery" before each shot. I had the side of the receiver drilled and tapped for this sight, so if I can find an appropriate Lyman model in steel I should be able to just replace it, but I'm thinking it might be simpler to just get a Williams Foolproof that's made for mounting to the side of an 1894/336. I know they're aluminum, not steel, but they've been on sale for a looooong time so I'm guessing they can't be too fragile. Anybody have experience with them?

As for a front sight, I already replaced the factory brass bead with an XS ramp with a white line up the middle. Doesn't cover the entire target like the brass bead did, and I can use the top of the (fairly wide) post as the vertical reference with the narrower white line providing horizontal reference. I'll see how that works on the next range trip. (I think I've discovered that I can sharpen up the front sight with my drug store readers - which are +1.25 - but I'll have to figure out how to do that with my shooting/safety glasses.)

But I've also been thinking about putting a globe sight on the front - I had one of those on the first gun I ever shot, too, and on a lot of guns since. I could use an appropriately sized aperture (ring) insert for accuracy testing, and any other shooting where the target can be more easily centered in a ring than balanced on a post (any of the not-too-long-range silhouette games, perhaps?) But I could easily switch to a post insert for faster work on non-circular-black targets. I have access to a machine shop, so I could remove the factory ramp and cut a lateral (female) dovetail in the barrel. Or I could make a longitudinal (male) dovetail base that would screw on in place of the factory ramp and accept a globe with a corresponding female dovetail - this is a target-style sight that has a screw to clamp it onto the base, but they are available in "normal" sizes, without the large rear rim like the Redfield Olympic front sight on the Winchester 52 I shot on the college rifle team.

So - has anybody put a globe sight on one of the Marlin lever actions? It's probably not something you'd do if you were going to carry the gun in a saddle scabbard. But I gather that globe front sights were not unknown on rifles in the 19th century, although perhaps not on lever action carbines. And for any context other than carrying on horseback, I'm thinking it might be the most flexible choice to let ME shoot more accurately with my ageing eyes.

Comments, and especially experience, appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's what I was thinking of, Brett, as it would avoid cutting the barrel and let everything be put back to factory original should my heirs prefer 'em that way. Where did you find that adapter? I think the 1894 barrel is a larger diameter than the 39, so I'd need to find one that was at least close.
 

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Mine came on the gun when I got it, midway sells them, think their Williams brand. Mines alloy so easily modified, my sight was canted slightly- bit of filing and adjusted base so sight sits straight now.
The Lyman globe (which is a lot smaller than the anshutz) works well with the Williams foolproof sight. With the Anshutz globe I have a central sight with adjustable Parker-hale apature

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1...ase-screw-on-450-height-350-radius-steel-blue
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Brett. I called Williams today to see what the screw spacing is on their dovetail attachment base - somehow I have the impression it is NOT 0.70" like the screw holes currently in the barrel, but I couldn't find the spec on the web site. Had to leave word on a recorder, so I also left a query in case the hole spacing isn't right, about taking one of the cross-dovetail mounting bases they offer (that would mount in a transverse dovetail slot in the barrel, like the factory one for the rear leaf sight), grinding off the dovetail, running a ball end mill down the bottom to match the diameter of the barrel, and drilling properly spaced holes for the attachment screws. Might have to buy the end mill, but I have access to the other necessary tools. It will be interesting to see what they say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Got a call back from Williams and they confirmed that their globe base screws are NOT spaced 0.70 but 0.84 (might have been 0.86). He said the most common way people put a globe front sight on one of these guns is just drive out the brass bead from the front ramp and put in one of the globes with a transverse dovetail, but I did that on the Marlin 80-DL I got in 1956 and it's too wonky looking for me at my advanced age. He did say that my proposed adjustments to their solid base (grind off the transverse dovetail, drill properly spaced holes and mill the bottom to match the diameter of the barrel) would work given my access to machine tools. I'll discuss that with my machinist friend in the next few days.
 

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wrangler5,


A small individual mfg I know may have something that will fit your needs. Steve Earle Products. Check out his web site for options. He will also pick up the phone to discuss your needs to make sure the plan works.

I have several of his front sight blocks on Contender and Encore barrels plus scope blocks on some single shot rifles.
 

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I would go with a 3-9x40 peep sight.
I know they are unsightly at first but very good.
All joking aside
Ranger Point Precision or Sknner sights woud be my first go to.
 
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