Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't actually call this a trivia question as I don't know the answer. In going over some notes while reading up on a few things prior to a gun show his coming weekend, I see that the one of the 1881 Marlin patents was made to E.A.W. Toepperwein. Was this the same Toepperwein that was a trick shooter for Win at one time? What part of the 1881 did the patent cover?

It's not like I'll fall into a cheap 1881 or anything, but I got to wondering about it. SW
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,243 Posts
I believe he went by Ad Topperwein, and he would have been a young man about the right time, but I'll have to do some checking. Very good question, and may be a real stumper!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
'Ad' and his wife, 'Plinky' shot exhibition for Win, but I'm not sure if it was him or his father that would have been involved in the patent. The couple were shooting exhibition into the 40s if I recall correctly. SW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,586 Posts
Ad Topperwein was still alive in 1958. His father was a gunsmith and may have earned some patents on his own... I have no information on the senior Topperwein's involvement with Marlin....

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Speaking of trick shooters, a chap by the name of Chris Gottlieb was employed by WRA Co. in the late 1890s. I don't know when he quit shooting. I believe he was a cohort of Mr. Topperwein. I have a well used, not abused, L.C. Smith A-2 that is lettered as being sold to "Chris S. Gottlieb" in 1897. That was a $400.00 scattergun in 1897! It was rebarreled by Hunter Arms to include the 'new' ejector system and a vent rib. Have any of you ever heard of Gottlieb? The Trap Shooting Hall of Fame had absolutely no reference to him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I looked further into the matter & it's surprising how many exhibition shooters there were back in the day. The last big trick shooting promo I saw mention of was Remington, who sponsored an exhibition shooter to plug holes in wooden blocks with a Nylon 66. I don't recall how many blocks the guy shot consecutively, but it was a huge pile. Rem then packed one of the blocks with each Nylon 66 until the supply was exhausted.

I haven't discovered any new info on the Toepperweins. SW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
In 1948 one of the trick shots came to Redding cal. to shoot for the boy scouts.Shot two faces then wanted to show how fast the bullets was to teach our young minds not to shoot without a safe back ground.He had a 55 gallon barrel set up with a jar full of gasoline on the top and a lit candle in the bottom.I'll NEVER forget that demonstration.He fired and before the sound reached our ears the gas exploded.His point was that,once the gun is fired it is too late for anything.....It made a great impression on us all.Darn,I cannot remember his name..And so goes old age.modoc
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,243 Posts
Too bad about the two faces he shot, hope the people survived OK! :wink: :wink:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,243 Posts
That is just an astounding report on Ad Topperwein! Really great information, and a lot of records I was unaware of!
Thanks for the great link Steve!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
While the bio doesn't come right out & say it, it sure looks like his father was the one connected with the 1881 Marlin patent. SW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I don't know how many Toepperwein's lived in Boerne, Texas on July 24,1875. But it would seem that the patent was almost certainly issued to Ad's father, Emil Albrecht Ferdinand Toepperwein. It covers three specific "IMPROVEMENT IN MAGAZINE-FIREARMS", but I think Marlin's interest basically related to the cartridge lifter arraignment. The patent describes it as being crank operated, not lever, but the lifter and springs are the patented ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Rick,

Thanks for that! While the lifter arrangement was innovative, I notice it didn't last long. Mine never did feed right with the dummy rounds I made, but I just wrote it off as that specific lifter or the ammo being defective in some way. SW
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top