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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems- tight- rough- as it slides along, in and out. The question- should, could, I us something light, that wouldn't remove much metal, and just smooth the outside of the bolt a little?
If I did, what would the risks be, like rust- since I'd probably be removing some proective coating.
I realize it's not a 5,000 dollar rifle, that is smooth as silk- but I do like the idea of smoothing it up. Or maybe, it's a bad idea and I should forget it? It works fine...it's, after all, a Marlin.
Oh, while I'm here, got a quick suggestion for a scout scope? Cheap, like under 150-200? Not a big deal, but if you know one right off the bat-
 

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I smoothed areas on my bolt using a Q-tip and Flitz. Worked pretty well and after smoothing other areas made the action easier to work.
 
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Read the sticky by eli chaps in polishing and tuning your lever action. Shows you how to slick the action.
 

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Chuck, just a couple of other ideas, first read Eli Chaps thread on tuning polishing the Marlins. Second part of the roughness may in fact be the point when the bolt rides over the hammers nose, both in travel to the rear and to the front or battery position. That can be helped, but do so very carefully, too much ''polishing '' on the hammer nose will require a new hammer. Eli's thread will help alot, just follow his instructions and all will be well. Take care, John.
 

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I tear the bolt down all the way and chuck them in my lathe and polish them with 320 grit paper then switch to 400. It don't take much off and does a bit of good.

You can also use a product like tooth polish, apply it to the bolt and cycle the gun while watching the TV.
 

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The Eli Chaps sticky:
http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/polishing-tuning-your-levergun/44524-polishing-336-action-ka-basic-action-job-how.html


After that, follow Swany's advice about polishing the bolt, realizing you probably don't have access to a lathe, I mean the tooth polish/cycling the action for a while. I used polishing compound myself, worked good, but was kind of a pain getting it all back off (lots of brake cleaner and WD40). After that, I lubed it excessively using Hornady One Shot, letting it dry, then coating the whole thing in Gun Butter Grease, not an endorsement, but that's what I had on hand, and worked it some more. It's all good now. Almost scary smooth. It took me a couple of days, but the weather was rotten, and I wasn't going anywhere anyway.
 

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If it is a new gun, go to the thread by Marlin Man about disassembly of the 1895. You'll find it linked in the thread others mentioned and 45nut linked to. Tear the gun down and give it a thorough cleaning. New guns can have a lot of manufacturing debris left in them and the new Remington guns are especially prone to this. While it's apart, study everything. Look for burrs, rough machining, scratches/wear marks, etc. But also, study how the gun goes together and functions. By and large, the bolt doesn't make a lot of actual contact to surfaces inside the receiver.

Buying spare parts used to be a snap when Marlin was still sole-owned, but now under Remington buying anything much more than screws is getting to be a real pain. But even in the "old" days, I always strongly cautioned against messing with the bolt too much. Mess that up and it's a lot more trouble to replace (head spacing, etc.).

If it is a new or very little used gun, then once you put it back together, cycle it about 80 gillion times. Just very lightly oil the mating surfaces of the innards, pay attention to the wear marks. The tear it all down again and give it another good thorough cleaning.

If you're confident, go ahead and lightly address any burrs you might find on the first or second tear down.

Repeat the clean-cycle, clean-cycle process until you feel confident in how the gun functions, how the parts mate up, can feel hang-ups, and are comfortable in taking the next step to polishing. You might find you don't need to do any polishing and the clean-cycle process will break it in enough to your satisfaction.

Oh, and if you don't already have them, get some gunsmithing screwdrivers. I like the Grace Gun Tools Marlin set but there's lots of options. Trust me, you'll be thankful for them and they are worth the investment.

By taking your time and working the gun and really learning about how the parts interact you gain a ton of knowledge and lose nothing but some time and maybe some frustration at it not working just the way you want but that's a lot better than messing something up. Ask me how I know. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Good stuff, thanks guys- duh, I shoulda known to look at the sticky's first.
The grittiness DOES happen when the bolt is going back & forth, over the hammer- I'll look for any marks- and do the extractor-less action- see if it smooths out without the extractor.
I feel pretty confident about working on it, but kinda hesitant, too- so will be very careful about taking metal off.
I have smoothed pistol actions before, so I know a little bit- but never heard the toothpaste trick- cool.
Eli, it's lightly used now- was new, I'[ve run about 100 rounds thru it- so I may be step-by-step on it at this point, no rush. I;l check the hammer, and the extractor, then maybe use the tootthpaste and work it a bunch before gettin' too rough with her.
Going to the sticky's now, and thanks again gentlemen.
Oh, as for oiling- when I work on the bolt I'll use white lithium grease, I think. Yall have seen the little tubes in the gun shops probably- about 5 bucks for a teeny lil tube. I bought it at Home Depot- bout the size of a tube of caulk- think it was $3.95. If anyone is interested, it works great on pistol slides. (Not to leave on the bolt, only when cycling to work it loose.)
 

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As mentioned, I'd be somewhat cautious and/or over-zealous in removing basic material. I've read of people over doing it before, and then the bolt not being able to cock/depress the hammer enough to fully lock it down in place without some help. Too much bolt play in how it fits into the receiver, or perhaps the area that contacts the hammer... something along those lines anyway? Good luck to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'll definitely be careful- I respect my guns- intend for them to last til I'm gone, and then my g'daughter grows old with em. I have two Rugers, hand-polished em, and had my initials lasered into them. Plan on taking good care of them- and my Marlin.
 

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Will mention the old method of sooting or using a permanent marker to coat areas of any interacting surfaces to check for actual rub points. A very simple process yet gives huge amounts of info as to where tight or binding areas actually are.
 

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A lot of the old methods are still viable. I hadn't thought about using a marker, even with one on my workbench.:hmmmm: Probably would have saved me a lot of time. I'll probable try it anyway, just to see if there's something else I should put a buff on. Thanks Metalsmith!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Read the sticky by eli chaps in polishing and tuning your lever action. Shows you how to slick the action.
Can someone either provide a link or tell me which form to look in? I have searched for an hour and can't find his- there's another 'Tuning your lever.." but it's not Eli's. There's a link in an old thread but it doesn't work anymore.
 

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Check the groove that is machined on the left side of the bolt. It what the extractor rides in. It may be rough. I would NOT sand the OD of the bolt.
+1. Put some oil in that groove, and then work the bolt. You may be surprised at how much difference that makes.

Also, what I did with mine when it was new, is I cleaned everything thoroughly, and then lubed it, re-assembled it, and then worked the bolt for awhile. Later, I cleaned it again, lubed it again, and did the same thing some more. Before long, mine was pretty darn smooth.

Oh, and I definitely would NOT polish any material off your hammer if you're not a skilled home gunsmith. A bit of lube on it where the bolt slides across it can also make a noticeable difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I worked on it last night. FLITZ polish and open-close-open-close-open....it seems a bit easier to work the lever now. I wouldn't try removing metal from the bolt- or the hammer- too inexperienced- as ol' Clint used to say, a man has to know his limitations.
I have some 600 steel wool, didn't rub hard, but did push it into the groove on the bolt, and just kinda rubbed the whole outside. Got tired of fooling with it- will be shooting it in the next day or so, to try out the new scope- then I'll know whether I helped it any. the hammer doesn't really bother me- it's just a little pressure on the bolt, smooth..inserting the bolt after cleaning is my main issue.
 

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Can someone either provide a link or tell me which form to look in? I have searched for an hour and can't find his- there's another 'Tuning your lever.." but it's not Eli's. There's a link in an old thread but it doesn't work anymore.

That happens when the OP deletes his own thread.
 
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