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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
An Old Phart's love/hate dysfunctional relationship with GUN SHOWS

OK, I think the Old Phart may have just been to my very last gun show.....but also came away with a jewel. I need extensive counseling on this personal issue.

Yesterday, 6/29/2019 I got to the Tyler, TX gun show. As I am walking around the tables I notice something. Almost every gun I see (or so it seems) has a $1,200 price tag on it.

1. A used Ruger 7 1/2 Regular Blackhawk in .45 Colt with brass frame....$1,200. When i got the same exact model in 1979 it was only $200.
2. 100% of every S&W N frame revolver.....$1,250 and up. When I got my Model 25 nickle in .45 Colt with presentation box and goodies it was only $400 in 1981.
3. Even a used nickle 4 inch Colt Trooper.....$1,200. When i got my 6 inch Nickle Colt Trooper at the MCRD exchange on the base it was only $250 in 1979.
These prices have far exceeded any inflation rate.

No matter what I looked at, it was $1,200 or more. It got to the point I was ready to leave after only 30 minutes in.

Then I found this little guy. Made in 1909, all original. I poked around and found a Tripple K magazine so as to not wear out the original one. Then found four boxes of ammo. The last two boxes i got from a guy for only $10 each. Took it home and shot it immediately and it was flawless.

There is also a technique to shooting it that is lost on the current techniques. You shove your finger all the way in the housing and also press your thumb against the frame. It is not a target pistol. It is what gangsters and G men used to off each other at close range. It was meant to fire lots of bullets at the target real fast and not malfunction. It does its job very well.

It is cute to watch those on You Tube shooting them using "modern" techniques. With their trigger finger tip gently squeezing and holding it with both hands. Downright funny to watch. This is the type of gun cousin Louie offed Danny " The Nose" with while they were both eating at a diner and got lasagna and brains all over his suit. You don't stand still and squeeze off shots with this little bad boy. It ain't meant for Camp Perry.

So...What is wrong with these internet gun runners that appear show after show, never sell anything, yet keep raising their prices on the unsold items year after year? They missed a basic economics lesson somewhere along the way and their greed seem to be the only thing driving them now.

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I got tired of seeing endless rows of black guns, the snapping of stun guns, fake samurai swords, cases of old banged up "collectible" knives, booths of jerky, yada yada yada.
Not to mention the $500 Mosin's. I really shoulda snagged one when they glutted the market and could be had for $75.
Depressing. It's like all the major department and home stores - every one of them has the same bland crap.
I tell my wife the world is colored grey with all the sameness.
Gun shows can be fun with those occasional gems like you found but sometimes it's too much like work.
 

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i quit gun shows about 2years ago.
i don't want anything else anyway...
they never have any savage 99's or rem 721/722's and if they do,
they are rediculously overpriced...
the people are rude as hell and the knives are crap.
the last show i went to i almost got in a fist fight.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I got tired of seeing endless rows of black guns, the snapping of stun guns, fake samurai swords, cases of old banged up "collectible" knives, booths of jerky, yada yada yada.
Not to mention the $500 Mosin's. I really shoulda snagged one when they glutted the market and could be had for $75.
Depressing. It's like all the major department and home stores - every one of them has the same bland crap.
I tell my wife the world is colored grey with all the sameness.
Gun shows can be fun with those occasional gems like you found but sometimes it's too much like work.


You hit the nail on the head. It is just too much work now and I can't get past the overt greed and corruption these internet gun runners have done to my beloved pasttime.

I saw a You Tube video last night of a new reproduction on my little .32 and the MSRP is $1,395 !!!!
Insanity seems to run rampant now.
 

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OP, think back a few years.

After the war, regular folks bought houses.
The mechanic, the post man, the milk man, the barber.

Mom stayed home and raised the family, while Dad earned and bought the house and groceries.
Bread and milk was cheap because it was plentiful.

Fast forward to today... huge increase in population.
The demand for goods is FAR higher than in our youth.

Bread is cheap when one or two people want a loaf.
When a hundred people want that same loaf, the price goes sky-high.
Econ-101.

Here in Kalifornistan, repression makes firearm goods in very high demand.
This is somewhat less in the free states (for now), but there is still that underlying fear of impending repression.

I recently scored a 2002 Ruger Bisley Vaquero.
It was seen by over 360+ viewers on Gunbroker.
This is "demand".

I scored a smoking deal ($550) for a gun that sold used in a pawn shop for the same MSRP in 2004.
This is "demand."
The RENE guide says only 4,075 of these were made, so scarcity drives up demand and the price.
I would have paid more, because I wanted a twin brother for the Vaquero I currently own.

I believe as we move forward with ever-increasing populations and ever-increasing levels of repression and infringement, prices will continue to go up.
Is it "greed" or simply responding to supply and demand?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
OP, think back a few years.

After the war, regular folks bought houses.
The mechanic, the post man, the milk man, the barber.

Mom stayed home and raised the family, while Dad earned and bought the house and groceries.
Bread and milk was cheap because it was plentiful.

Fast forward to today... huge increase in population.
The demand for goods is FAR higher than in our youth.

Bread is cheap when one or two people want a loaf.
When a hundred people want that same loaf, the price goes sky-high.
Econ-101.

Here in Kalifornistan, repression makes firearm goods in very high demand.
This is somewhat less in the free states (for now), but there is still that underlying fear of impending repression.

I recently scored a 2002 Ruger Bisley Vaquero.
It was seen by over 360+ viewers on Gunbroker.
This is "demand".

I scored a smoking deal ($550) for a gun that sold used in a pawn shop for the same MSRP in 2004.
This is "demand."
The RENE guide says only 4,075 of these were made, so scarcity drives up demand and the price.
I would have paid more, because I wanted a twin brother for the Vaquero I currently own.

I believe as we move forward with ever-increasing populations and ever-increasing levels of repression and infringement, prices will continue to go up.
Is it "greed" or simply responding to supply and demand?



It is pure GREED. Nothing else. Honorable people do not behave like those internet gun runners do at gun shows.
ARs are not scarce and do not cost $1,600.
100 people DO NOT WANT those $1,250 N frames or $1,600 ARs.

Bread spoils and gets moldy. Guns last forever if cared for properly.
Everyone needs bread to eat. Not every member of the population needs or even wants guns. No comparison.
The little .32 I bought was 110 years old and shot like the day it was made. No spoilage there.


If they were actually selling their guns for those overinflated prices, I would be forced to agree with you, but they are not.
No one is buying their wares at the nosebleed levels they are asking for them.
That is why they need to revisit ECONOMICS 101....not us.


Many of us saw this same foolishness with 22 rimfire not that long ago.
We all saw the $100 price tags on bricks that just a couple months previous sold for $20.
Only idiots paid those prices, but the majority of us looked with disdain upon those charging them.

This current situation is no different.
There is no screaming demand for $1,600 ARs and $1,250 N frames....and there never was a demand for a $1,200 Colt Trooper or Ruger Blackhawk.

It is all about GREED, not economic realities.
 

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I've found the same thing. I haven't bought anything at a gun show in over a year (and that was a single shot 410). I've seen the same stuff that hasn't sold for the last 12 months show up with a higher price tag--a (newer) Winchester 94 Trapper in 44 mag had been priced at $700 for the last year; last show, it was up to $950. Makes no sense to me. Occassionally, there are some different vendors that show up, and it adds a little variety. In the "old days", I was really upset if I missed a show. These days, it's more of an "Oh well."

Sometimes the best deals are the ones from individuals carrying around something they want to sell. The table vendors won't give them anything for it, so sometimes you can get them for a better than decent price.
 

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I'm not into new guns. That to me is approx from 1980 up in most cases. The older classic guns are where you see crazy prices. A model X Winchester in 90%+ condition is booked at Xdollars. I don't go by the book but that gives you a idea of what they go for. These book prices are suppose to be based on average of auction prices. On line and at shows the same model X Winchester is tagged at the top end price reguardless of condition. These guns don't fly off tables but there must be enough people paying these prices or they wouldn't be tagged that high.
 

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The rows of black guns and other military shooting stuff shuts me off. We have some big shows in the Twin Cities and I am sure we could have an army with all the stuff they sell. There are always a few tables of great stuff. We now have a large table of barley clad ladies selling their calendars. There is a guy that has a million junk knives. One retired gentleman braids bullwhips and does a really good job. Sells them too cheap. I go to see if I can root out a gem, but it is getting harder.
 

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I backed off the gun shows many years ago .... I walked up to the ticket window and it was going to cost me almost as much as a pound of powder, just to get in and spend my money....nope....I'll take the powder, thank you very much....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I got tired of seeing endless rows of black guns, the snapping of stun guns, fake samurai swords, cases of old banged up "collectible" knives, booths of jerky, yada yada yada.
Not to mention the $500 Mosin's. I really shoulda snagged one when they glutted the market and could be had for $75.
Depressing. It's like all the major department and home stores - every one of them has the same bland crap.
I tell my wife the world is colored grey with all the sameness.
Gun shows can be fun with those occasional gems like you found but sometimes it's too much like work.


You know, BubbaJon, I don't think i have ever heard a more accurate description of a present day guns show that you just gave in post number 2.
Excellent observational skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The rows of black guns and other military shooting stuff shuts me off. We have some big shows in the Twin Cities and I am sure we could have an army with all the stuff they sell. There are always a few tables of great stuff. We now have a large table of barley clad ladies selling their calendars. There is a guy that has a million junk knives. One retired gentleman braids bullwhips and does a really good job. Sells them too cheap. I go to see if I can root out a gem, but it is getting harder.

Mark, if there was some decent T&A like you described, I would not complain so much. That would have at least covered the $8 I paid to get in.
but, alas, not at any down here. (sniffles)
I am jealous.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Too crowded for me. People are getting bigger & wider, too, and there are narrow aisles between the rows of tables. Why would a woman bring a baby stroller down narrow aisles in a gun show?

DRSLYR


DRSLYR...you just made me spit sweet tea all over my screen....:eek:
 

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I sat up for over 30yrs didn't miss to many. Slacked off for about 10 yrs to a few in winter months. Still did a walk through at several shows but didn't set up. Since 2000 the shows have steadily went down hill. Premoters have turned them into flea markets selling tables to anyone. Black guns and plastic pistols are all you see. I'm to the point I don't need to walk through anymore. You are better off to loaf in the parking lot to find a deal.
 

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Totally agree! Gun shows are not worth the price of admission. Table after table of overpriced guns. Just like internet gun sites, everybody thinks that their 20 year old rifle in "good" condition has somehow increased in value because it's 20 years old. Nevermind, it's one of a million that were made. At least on the internet you can set the price range and pair it down from 1,200 rifles to a dozen to see who is actually serious about selling. Thinking about when I retire I would like to send every dilusional seller a message asking to explain their absurd hope that somehow, somewhere somebody may just buy it over the hundreds of similarly overpriced guns. Or why a reasonable person would not just go to a gun shop and buy a brand new gun for the same or less.
 

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I'm not into new guns. That to me is approx from 1980 up in most cases. The older classic guns are where you see crazy prices. A model X Winchester in 90%+ condition is booked at Xdollars. I don't go by the book but that gives you a idea of what they go for. These book prices are suppose to be based on average of auction prices. On line and at shows the same model X Winchester is tagged at the top end price reguardless of condition. These guns don't fly off tables but there must be enough people paying these prices or they wouldn't be tagged that high.
There is virtually no overhead for GunBroker and for the gun shows it's the vendor and table fees so they don't have to sell a lot at those prices cover their outlay.

$200 in 1979 dollars is the equivalent of $750 of today's dollars, so yes $1200+ is not an equivalent price compared to the original price, but it's not a surprise at all since they are either no longer being made or are not the same quality. You are not talking about new items that are priced to compete with the cheaper to manufacture black guns. These older guns are sought after by collectors so they are going to be priced higher.

For the new guns it's mostly younger buyers that are buying them, while the men that buy the classic pistols are collectors or men that are older with more disposable income that are looking for that one they always wanted years ago and couldn't afford or that one they had and let slip away.

For collectable firearms it's a sellers market while it's more of a buyers market for new firearms. I've gotten some good deals from penny auctions on GunBroker for several new Walther PPQ's, some that I've bought for less then half of MSRP. I've also seen a lot of collectables go for an okay to good deal price, only to be relisted at 4 times that price by the person that bought it. :banghead:
 

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Guess I'm the oddball here because I still like to go to the shows. Been doing it for a long time and still think it's pretty cheap entertainment for a couple of hours. Also every once in awhile you run across a really good deal. Last winter I picked up a 20x Unertal scope in great shape for 600.00, more than covered my admission fee.
 
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