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Morning All!

Right after joining up with this outfit a few years ago my workaday world kinda "swallered its head" and the resultant frenzy has kept me from pursuing much in the way of "fun stuff" since then. Oh, I've peeked in now and again when I had a second but never long enough to get involved in anything...

All that's changing fast now as I've hung up my spurs (as far as working is concerned anyway!) and am getting to a place where I can indulge a few whims...like this one.

The back story first. Years ago, my Dad came into possession of a Winchester '92 in .25-20. Between corrosive priming, black powder and general neglect the bore evidently looked like nine miles of bad road. As for accuracy, Daddy described the piece as "about like throwin' rocks". Now Daddy was no gun crank (firearms were merely loud tools to him), so it still amazes me that he sent the rifle off to Winchester to be re-barreled to .218 Bee (I've still got their original correspondence buried around here somewhere). As gunsmithing jobs go, it certainly wasn't "Guild" quality: a round 24" tube with a Williams ramp up front and a standard rear which listed ever so slightly to port. Once it returned, he had a local 'smith (and I use that term lightly) drill and tap the side of the receiver for a Weaver side mount and mounted a Weaver 2.5 (with post and horizontal crosswire). The rig shot well enough to the irons, but the scope had enough parralax that, when combined with the sloppy check weld dictated by the side mount, had him almost back to "throwin' rocks". Regardless, it was his go-to turkey rifle for a lot of years and it was the first centerfire rifle I carried as a youth. I took my first whitetail with it and a factory WW 46 grain hollowpoint, a stunt that makes me cringe to this day.

Daddy's been gone close to twenty years now, and the '92 has been sitting in the vault half-forgotten. I drug it out the other day for stroll down memory lane and gave some hard thought to what to do with it...as it's currently an ingenious solution to a non-existent problem. That's when I decided to honor both my father and the rifle with a restoration project!

As far as any Winchester serial number is concerned, this thing began as a .25-20...and it will be again. I've handed it over to a 'smith (a proper one this time!) for a new 24" octaganol barrel and new mag tube. He'll weld up all the holes in the receiver and send it off to Turnbull for color-case (along with the lever, buttplate and forend cap). Sights are still TBD, but they'll be period correct. A handsome piece of wood fore and aft will complete the package.

I've rounded up a set of dies and some 86 grain cast bullets...all that remains is FINDING SOME BRASS TO LOAD 'EM IN TO! Dang it boy, maybe I should have sorted out all my component issues before pulling the trigger on this project, but that ship's sailed! I've done a bunch of web surfin' to no avail...only a few scalpers out there that I've found...

So if I'm marked for payin' scalper prices anyway, I figure I might as well pay scalper prices to kindred spirits: Anybody got some .25-20 brass they'd consider parting with?

Many thanks in advance!

Mark
 
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My only experience with the .25-20: I was at my first CAS match in Hamilton, MT. A snowshoe, cabin fever special match in February, cold, a foot or so of snow on the ground. I had no lever gun at the time, and a very nice gent pressed his M92 in .25-20 on me for the fifty yard bison, little bitty steel targets way the heck and gone out there, with an unfamiliar rifle. Five shots, five buffler down, just like that. I sure liked that little gun but wound up eventually with a Rossi .44mag. Which my youngest son talked me out of last fall...on the hunt for a .357 lever now, and then my gun searches will be over (yeah sure right, we believe that sure). Well, until I find the right deal on 3" Parrot rifle...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, until I find the right deal on 3" Parrot rifle...
See, I KNEW I wasn't the only deeply disturbed individual out there. There's a place I drive past in Central-ish Texas that has a couple of small field pieces decorating his yard. You have NO idea how badly I've been tempted to stop and see what he'd take for one of 'em.

On the other hand, maybe you do!

Mark
 

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They can get pretty pricey...thing to do is, check out Hern Iron Works in Idaho, then build yer own carriage. I'm working on the fourth carriage for my Napoleon, as I am not the best by golly craftsman whoever lived, hahahaha. Design flaws and materials shortcomings have led to carriage failures. Nonetheless, I doubt I'll ever forget what a dandy little rifle that .25-20 was (back on thread). :)
 

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Hey there Bee -- Good thinking. Shoot me a PM with an address and I could donate to the brass situation. I had done about the same thing awhile back, only stayed with all blue.

View attachment 110202

And listen up snglstack... U.S. Parrott Rifle 2.9 (10-Pounder) & 3-inch | Steen Cannons | Authentic U.S. military cannons It's only money!! I was fortunate to have four six pounders under my command for awhile... They worked great on those pesky jet skiers!!

View attachment 110203

Hope this helps. Best regards. Wind
 

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Best of luck with your restoration Bee, and even more for your brass search. I've been looking for a year or so to no avail.
The only reason I'm not really desperate is that my 92 needs a reline before it will see any brass.

Wind, where are the gunports?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Wind! Why am I not surprised that you'd already hiked this trail? Beautiful little piece and love the sights: were you able to use the existing holes in the tang or did installation require drilling? I love to use the existing holes so as to not bugger the markings.

Love the photos. The country looks a little different between the first and second pics though; musta been a helluva hard rain come thru that country...no wonder you're wearin' a slicker!
 

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GREAT LOOKIN' WINDJAMMER!! These babies roamed the Maine Coast when I was a kid - folks paid good money to be a deckhand! LOL

Jeff
 

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218 Bee,
You can always resize any 218 bee or 32-20 brass that you might have on hand. Wrong headstamp, but they will work.

Peter in CA
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, Peter! I'd actually considered necking up some .218s but I'm a bit worried about the necks. I've got a bunch of them, though...the worst that could happen is that I lose a few to splitting. Just part of the fun of case forming!
 

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Hey again Bee -- The other thing is that 218BEE brass is twice as expensive as 25-20 brass and it would be a shame to not have an equally hard to find case. Best regards. Wind
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks, Wind...I'd laid in a supply of Bee brass years ago so I hadn't even checked cost/availability recently. If it's worse than .25-20, the cases must be made of "Unobtainium"!

I'd replied (or at least tried) to your earlier PM...did you receive any (or all) of my attempts? Never been stymied by a PM system before...'til now!

Mark
 

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Wind, in the seventie's there was a similar vessel plying Puget Sound. I had heard of it at one time in the past being a lumber hauler. Wouldn't be the same would it? Regard's.
 

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Hey there Pat/Rick -- Looks like I've inadvertently highjacked Bee's thread! Sorry Bee. The Winona was a three masted schooner rotting away on the south end of Lake Union in Seattle that spent her life as a lumber hauler. Loaded out of Blakely Harbor and Eagle Harbor on Bainbridge Island. Here's a shot of Blakely Harbor...

View attachment 110334

I was working on the Adventuress, an former Columbia River Bar Pilot Schooner, at 14 years of age, also sailing out of Puget Sound. First as a private vessel owned by the Borden Dairy people, and then a sail training type platform. That led to my first seamans documents at 16.

Puget Sound - a very interesting area full of sailing history.

Best regards. Wind
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hey there Pat/Rick -- Looks like I've inadvertently highjacked Bee's thread! Sorry Bee. The Winona was a three masted schooner rotting away on the south end of Lake Union in Seattle that spent her life as a lumber hauler. Loaded out of Blakely Harbor and Eagle Harbor on Bainbridge Island. Here's a shot of Blakely Harbor...

View attachment 110334


I was working on the Adventuress, an former Columbia River Bar Pilot Schooner, at 14 years of age, also sailing out of Puget Sound. First as a private vessel owned by the Borden Dairy people, and then a sail training type platform. That led to my first seamans documents at 16.

Puget Sound - a very interesting area full of sailing history.

Best regards. Wind
No worries, Wind!

Frankly, I find this fascinating as well...despite being a confirmed lubber. After reading all (what, 23?) of Patrick O'brien's books, I have all the respect in the world for the men that put to sea on wooden ships! Carry on, Mr. Wind!
 

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My apologies 218B,

Wind, I thought she looked a bit familiar, saw her sailing the Sound a couple of time's.
 

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218 Bee,
I had to buy some Starline 32-20 brass and neck it down. The 25-20 sizing die ended up putting a wrinkle the long way in about half of the necks. They still shoot ok, though. I had much better luck using a Redding Form & Trim die to do the task.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for the info. I may have to do something similar!
 
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