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My 1894C started acting up recently, the classic Marlin Jam, what the factory calls "Letting In Two". It had been fine up until that day, with only occasional hiccups, but suddenly it was jamming on every other shot, and a serious fix was imminent. I read all the usual posts, studied the methods, and decided to try one I hadn't seen done before. Instead of smoothing out the notch on the underside of the carrier/lifter, I decided to fix it so it couldn't cut another one. To do this fix you need files or a grinder, a jigsaw blade, and some J-B Weld. BTW, this process is described on the Marauder site, http://www.marauder.homestead.com/files/Marlin94Fix.html

Essentially, the difference with this fix is that you're replacing the area where the notch forms with a piece of much harder steel, far less likely to wear. The Marauder fix recommended a piece of Jigsaw blade, ground to fit. That's what I used, and it was a perfect choice.

I started by etching the area of the carrier to be ground off, the underside where the notch forms. I ground it to the same thickness of the blade, so as not to change the contours. The jigsaw blade first had the teeth ground off, then was cut to length, and was shaped until it was the same width as the section of carrier it was replacing. I didn't start taking pictures of what I was doing until I was almost done (duh!) but you can see from the pictures how it fits the notch I cut into the carrier. Once all the grinding was done and the section of blade was the right size, all I did was J-B weld it into place, let it set overnight, and reassemble the rifle. Voila! It's slicker than it was before, and feeds flawlessly. I'm not a gunsmith, but at this point I think I could play one on TV. I consider this a permanent fix to the Marlin Jam, but this rifle gets shot a LOT, and if it ever goes south again, this is a pretty easy way to fix it.









I know it looks a little crooked, and I doubt it would have mattered, but I took the pictures right after I pressed it into place, and I DID straighten it out before it set. Even for someone with no training as a machinist (like me), this is pretty easy to do. Just don't take off too much metal, and you'll be fine.

Papajohn
 

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I've read too many posts on this and other sites about the "Marlin Jam" over the past few years and the one response I'm still waiting for is from Marlin......Why don't they just admit that the problem is REAL and offer to fix or replace the parts that cause the problem and put an end to it.....Later,B.
 

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They admit it but its a wear issue that usually takes a long time if ever to surface. If your gun is relatively new they will fix it free & if not the parts are redilly available. :)
 

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Good job, PJ

You did a very professional looking job! ;D

Joe 8)
 

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...for a gun that's not been used or shot the equivalent of a box...don't think it's been shot at all...I wonder if I should order a new carrier and change it out myself...or would the new one do the same??? The gun was made in 2000 and the factory said it was out of warranty, of course...I'd rather not go through all this work if I can get it fixed otherwise...it only lets the second one in about 1/8"...but that's enough to get the lever jammed open....
You'd think Marlin would make the carrier out of a better steel...couldn't cost them that much more...and stop that "legend" problem once for all...maybe Remington will cause quality to return to the old days...we can hope...
 

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Leverdude said:
They admit it but its a wear issue that usually takes a long time if ever to surface. If your gun is relatively new they will fix it free & if not the parts are redilly available. :)
"long time" ?
How about one year?
Yes, most of my use was SASS shooting and dry-firing for same, but ONE year is not a long time. If one was using it a couple of times a year for deer season, yes, it might take a long tome.
Marlin wouldn't help me and it took 6 weeks of Backorders from Midway-Brownell's (and $48) to obtian a new Carrier-assembly. I don't think I'll be buying another Marlin lever-gun with Marlin's lack of CS.
 

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HaroldB said:
Leverdude said:
They admit it but its a wear issue that usually takes a long time if ever to surface. If your gun is relatively new they will fix it free & if not the parts are redilly available. :)
"long time" ?
How about one year?
Yes, most of my use was SASS shooting and dry-firing for same, but ONE year is not a long time. If one was using it a couple of times a year for deer season, yes, it might take a long tome.
Marlin wouldn't help me and it took 6 weeks of Backorders from Midway-Brownell's (and $48) to obtian a new Carrier-assembly. I don't think I'll be buying another Marlin lever-gun with Marlin's lack of CS.
Well, all I can say is mines over 30 years old & has no issue. I had another that had an issue but was a little newer. Time is a relative thing I guess but the FACT is theres many thousands of them out there & most never have an issue. Most folks have much better experiences with Marlin gun service too. I'v gotten parts replaced for guns that I bought second hand. Marlin has a 5 year guarantee too, I'd write a letter. :)
 

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Almost a year after I did this fix, and about 8,000 rounds, I can report that my rifle is happily perking along, slick as ever, and it now feeds 38 Special rounds, where it wouldn't before. I consider this a permanent fix. It's easy to do for anyone with a modicum of skill, and you can feel the difference as soon as you reassemble the rifle. It has a solid, slick feel that wasn't there before, and no matter how fast or slowly I work the lever, it now feeds everything. I recently tore it down down a thorough cleaning, and there is no sign of wear anywhere. I highly recommend it.

And I gladly take no credit for anything more than making this fix better-known. I didn't think it up, I just decided it was the best option I could find, and like I said, it's a permanent fix. If your gun has issues, try it. What do you have to lose besides a jigsaw blade and some time?
 
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PJ,

Thanks for this post. I haven't experienced a "Marlin Jam" yet. But as an old chopper pilot I know "If something bad hasn't happened; it is about to". :(

I have marked this for future reference for the day I do need it! ::)

CJ
 

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As ususal, I am johnny come lately on this thread. But the Marlin jam is near and not so dear to my heart.
I have an 1894 I use for cowboy action. I love that rifle. But last year at a one of my biggest matches it happened.
I did not think it would because I only shoot four or five matches a year.

Long story short, I replaced the carrier and filed off the notch on the lever to fix it. If you suspect that you may be headed for a problem, take a look at the carrier to see if there is a small line etched in the soft metal from the lever. It the notch is there, you are ready for the jam. It does not take much of a notch to cause the problem.

I certainly am no gunsmith and I never even played one on TV, but I think Marlin could fix a lot of the problem
by simply removing the burr on the lever before assembly. That and a little grease could sure stop a lot of wear on the carrier.

By the way, excellent post and great pictures. Both ways will fix the problem.
 

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Another update, 08-16-11:

Another several thousand more rounds through the rifle, and it's as slick as ever, no hiccups, no issues, no wear on the jigsaw blade. I'm firmly convinced this is the BEST way to fix the Marlin Jam. 8)
 
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