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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a bad fire back in 2015 and lost a few hundred guns and more tools and the like I care not to mention. Anyhow I connected with a smithy within 35 miles from me whom is an old schooled artisan. I just got back from JB a guide gun that was NIB when bought back in the late 90's. The fire made it a hulk of discolored metal with what I though a death sentence to it. Well after making friends with JB and giving him a barrel of hopes I got the finished product the other day. I'd post pics but can't do it with the Laptop anymore - some damn conflict I can't clean up. If anyone can post pics I can have my wife do some with her phone and send them to a someone whom can.
I'll let my description say this much...beautiful blue all around . He even found the original nice checkered wood fore and aft. He went so far as to put a REAL case hardened finish on receiver , fore end cap/with sling boss. Just beautiful case hardening.... can't begin to describe the old school beautiful look. He is going to do my marlin 94 the same way( 357 mag ) , but can't find any checkered wood for it. It was not cheap.... cost me a $819 , but man you just can't buy that kind of gun like that at anywhere that looks so pretty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Finished product is beautiful. Are you sure the metal is sound enough to handle being used? I would be concerned myself.
As any sane person would be concerned. I understand "metal" enough to know how heat treat works... and carbon loss.
Modern rifle barrels are rarely effected by such temps . For example how many of us have shot M60's , M2's , M240's absolutely red whilst enjoying our time with uncle sugar. They can and will warp under such heat. The smithy uses sized 'bore rods' and straightens the barrels the old fashioned way . The receivers , bolts and any other "hardened parts" this smithy puts in a kiln he built. He runs these parts top a controlled temperature for a certain period of time. He then introduces ground rawhide. It will burn , then turn to carbon. It will then liquefy and you can watch it be absorbed into the metal...it's simply amazing to watch. He learned this in the US Navy when they did teach that skill set long ago when they knew parts had to be made and made right when at sea and or far away from the supply chain.
He made a 1918 Colt 1911 tougher than it was originally made by hardening at specific temps and saturation, of course with carbon introduced too. Now some things were too far gone in the fire to attempt such craftsmanship... he knows what can and can't be saved.... No BS to grab your money. If it can't be saved he will be straight up. He has a reputation around my area by word of mouth as he cares not to advertise.
 

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As any sane person would be concerned. I understand "metal" enough to know how heat treat works... and carbon loss.
Modern rifle barrels are rarely effected by such temps . For example how many of us have shot M60's , M2's , M240's absolutely red whilst enjoying our time with uncle sugar. They can and will warp under such heat. The smithy uses sized 'bore rods' and straightens the barrels the old fashioned way . The receivers , bolts and any other "hardened parts" this smithy puts in a kiln he built. He runs these parts top a controlled temperature for a certain period of time. He then introduces ground rawhide. It will burn , then turn to carbon. It will then liquefy and you can watch it be absorbed into the metal...it's simply amazing to watch. He learned this in the US Navy when they did teach that skill set long ago when they knew parts had to be made and made right when at sea and or far away from the supply chain.
He made a 1918 Colt 1911 tougher than it was originally made by hardening at specific temps and saturation, of course with carbon introduced too. Now some things were too far gone in the fire to attempt such craftsmanship... he knows what can and can't be saved.... No BS to grab your money. If it can't be saved he will be straight up. He has a reputation around my area by word of mouth as he cares not to advertise.
That's awesome. I hope he has an apprentice to pass those skills down! I would love to see this process! Sounds amazing!
 

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So happy you were able to find something positive from your tragedy. Can’t wait for a range report!
 
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What a great outcome to a heartbreaking story. I hope he is able to do more for you. I think the description of " Turnbull" like finish is spot on. The gentleman that did this for you could charge 3x what he did and folks would line up to have a skilled craftsman like him work on their firearms. I'm happy to hear you were able to bring some good out of your tragedy. In my opinion it was worth every penny.
 
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