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So our local range has a monthly BP match (perc. revolvers, BP cartridge revolvers, ML, cartridge rifles 20Y-100Y), and I got to thinking that I'd load up something for my 24" CB 45 Colt.
Not quite as accurate as some smokeless loads, but not too bad at about 5" @ 100 with a peep. At least able to ring the 10" dinger if you hold hard!
28 of Swiss 2f & a 250 rmfp seemed to work the best. Pretty good boom, but did not Crony it. I can see why this load probably accounted for a lot of deer in the old days.
 

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pathfinder65,

For 45 Colt rifle loads you should try Fg with compression. The slower BP will work just like slower smokeless powder, higher velocity. Also see if you can get the traditional 230 cowboy design or even the 200 gr Lee mold bullet. It's all about room for powder with a 24" barrel. For a wad, cut them from playing cards. The waxed thick paper is all you need. The last tip is do not resize the cases after firing. Only clean, reprime, and bell the mouth for the next bullet. Again, more volume for powder. The lighter bullet, slower powder, and unsized case combination should provide you an edge.

Enjoy.
 

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pathfinder65,
Interesting, I will give it a try, though I did shoot a few of the Lee 200's that I had & they did not group as well as the 250's. The 300's that I have also grouped pretty well, but with definitely more kick!
I didn't intend to make it look like I was going to hunt with it, just ring some steel or bowling pins out to 100Y.

These Cowboys are sure fun to shoot & BP gives them a new dimension.
Also, using a soft lube, I had no problem with bad fowling or leading for 30+ rounds. A couple wet patches & a couple dry followed by an Ed's red patch afterwards was all it took.

Enjoy.
For 45 Colt rifle loads you should try Fg with compression. The slower BP will work just like slower smokeless powder, higher velocity. Also see if you can get the traditional 230 cowboy design or even the 200 gr Lee mold bullet. It's all about room for powder with a 24" barrel. For a wad, cut them from playing cards the waxed thick paper is all you need. The last tip is do not resize the cases after firing. Only clean, reprime, and bell the mouth for the next bullet. Again, more volume for powder. The lighter bullet, slower powder, and unsized case combination should provide you an edge.


Enjoy.[/QUOTE]
 

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Remember the original load for the 45 Colt cartridge was 40 grains of black powder and the 250 round nosed flat point bullet. With the solid head cases of today only about 33 grains will fit in under the 250 grain slug. Check out Duelist 1954 site for a lot of black powder handgun loading information.
 

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pathfinder65,

The best damp patch solution for cutting the crud in one pass is premix 50/50 antifreeze and then a dry patch. Also, try different crimp pressures. With a full column of powder under the bullet, it can only go in one direction. Try a crimp that is just enough to keep the bullet in the case. With unsized cases after firing and a light crimp, the bullet could not be pulled out by hand and I could turn it in the case. Also, soft alloys usually perform better as well with BP. 30-1 or 40-1 have served me well depending on the BP cartridge with a softer lube.

My 45 Colt rifle is a Low Wall 1885 with a 24" barrel.

Also, I believe the Marlin 1894 CB has a 1 in 38" twist. A 250 gr bullet .7" long needs at least 900 fps to be comfortably stable. A 230 gr cowboy bullet with a generous grease groove is a little shorter and should stabilize better at BP velocity. This bullet by Accurate Bullet Molds has been the best for smokeless and BP loads for me. Also, attached is a bullet stabilizer calculator for you.

twist-rate-calculator

45-230S-D.png
 

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Sound like a fun project. I would make a chamber cast to determine what diameter bullet to use.

Try different makes of powder and grain sizes to see if they will improve accuracy. There is a difference in brands and types, much like smokeless powders. Your rifle will tell you what it likes. You will need a black powder lube and a black powder designed bullet.
 

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+1 on the blackpowder bullet lube. It's formulated to keep the BP fouling soft, and can help improve accuracy. Different than smokeless lube. SPG is always a good choice.
 

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As a general rule Swiss powder tend to give the highest velocities and burn a little cleaner. Most claim it likes soft primers like pistol primers. 28 grains is about what was loaded in the 45 Schofield revolver or 44 Henry. Good luck on the endeavor. While the unsized cases might work you may need ot crimp for a rifle? BP prevents stove piping and spring pressure in the magazine may keep them in so it may work?

DEP
 
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