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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a nice '93 carbine( Parley, you already have this one in your database) that has an extra coat of stuff, probably varnish, that I would like to remove WITHOUT harming the finish underneath. The wood has not been sanded and is in terrific shape, except for the varnish.
It is nice old gun and has great metal finish with fading case colors, 99+ bluing on the barrel. I don't want to screw this one up. :lol:
 

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Well............I have bought my share of rifles that had crud slopped on the stocks in the name of 'refinishing'. I always use Formby's finish remover with fine steel wool. A toothbrush works well for any checkering. I use TLC when removing the gunk and have always been satisfied with the wood underneath. If you are looking to remove just the top layer, I am at a loss there!
 

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I've used a number of different chemical strippers. Some work better than others, but they all work, without hurting the wood. Follow the directions closely, and be sure to scrub the stock with hot soapy water after stripping. This will get any residue of stripper off, and slightly raise the grain, to accept the new finish.
For finishing, I love Permalyn Sealer from Brownells. It allows you to build up coats slowly, and can be applied over any old finish, so if you miss a tiny amount of the old finish, it wont remain sticky.
With enough coats, it will take on a nice hand rubbed oil look, but it never gets too shiny.
 

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How does one apply the new finish to the checkering without clogging it up? I'v a couple that I'v been thinking about stripping but am afraid of screwing up the checkering.
 

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I actually mask off the checkering, and finish the rest of the stock. After the rest is finished, I then give the checkering one light coat with a toothbrush, and wipe off any excess while it's still very wet. As long as you do it that way, you can even give it a couple coats, wiping off as you go. The masking will also protect the checkering betwen coats, while you wet sand. I always wet sand my stocks as I apply finish. I use 600 grit wet or dry, and this helps fill the pores, making a super smooth finish.
The Permalyn that I use is very watery, and even with 4 coats on the checkering, it doesn't build up, if I wipe it off after each application. Remember to remove the masking tape after each coat of finish, and reapply before the next coat, or it will be permanently stuck there!
Hope this helps.
 

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I will try that, thanks. That Permalyn you mention, I'v never seen it. Is it an oil finish like tung or linseed oil? I'v seen guys use polyurathane not wanting to listen to me & I never liked the results, tho some of them have.
I like oil myself & tung seems to suit my taste better than tru oil which is good as well but a little heavy IMO.
 

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Permalyn is a poly base, but it's not like any poly base finish you've ever seen or used. It is the old Laurel Mountain sealer that uses an oil modified polymere, so it isn't brittle or hard like most Polyurethane finishes. It is also easily touched up like an oil finish, so if you get a scratch, or scrape, you can refinish all or part of it, without any problems.
It's sold as either the Sealer, or Stock Finish, but I only use the sealer, as it gives the results I'm looking for. The sealer is thinner, so it penetrates deep, while the finish is a bit thicker, and fills more. That's what I want to avoid in refinishing a stock, so I don't use the Stock Finish.
 

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I thank you Sir. :)
 
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