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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I use a case checker when reloading .45 ACP, but don't have one for the .457 Wild West Mag. Google couldn't find one in 45-70 either.
So I stopped by Wild West Guns and talked to my good friend Brian. He really hooked me up.
I'm very happy with the quality of this checker, it's finished nicely and will help me load for my 1895.
If you reload for a .457 WW Mag or a .50 Alaskan, I would highly suggest you get one of these.






 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Crusty,
I'm not saying my way is the only way. Most of my reloading is done at my duty station and often I do not have my 457 with me. I hav loaded many thousands of 45 ACP, and still check 2 or 3 out of 50, and do occasionally find a problem cartridge with the case checker.

I live and work in dangerous places at dangerous times. I will be checking every 457 case I make with the new case checker. It is faster and easier than the dial micrometer, and every bit as accurate.
Danomite.45
 

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Thanks for the explanation Danomite45.

In all the years I hand loaded, I have never had an issue such as you suggest except when using a lee factory crimp die - the verity with the carbide ring in the die mouth - where the lee die was forcing lead alloy from the cast bullet to form a ring of lead around the case mouth which prevented the 45acp case from seating to the proper depth to allow the slide to go to battery.

Got rid of the lee die and just used a "properly" adjusted three die set for the cartridges and no more problem.

During early cast bullet load development for the .40S&W feeding issues again came down to the point of "proper" sizing/seating die adjustment and everything runs smooth.

I did have some chambering issues at one point with the 45/70, but a check die such as you have would not have caught the problem as it was NOT a case, loaded cartridge issue, but rather the ojive profile of the bullet coupled with a short throat in the rifle.

Thanks again.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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do what works, bro, but I'll warn you, case checkers do miss problems. found that out the hard way with some .308 ammo.

my 45-70 loads are generally low pressure, so as long as case length and COAL check out, I'm good to go.

call me anal, but I caliper every single cartridge that I put in my rifles.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't have that kind of time....and I don't think it is as good of a failsafe.
If it fits, it shoots.
I use a caliper to check every piece of brass for AOL before and after trimming, COAL every 100 or so, and the crimp every 50.
other than that, every cartridge gets a run through the gauge.
a caliper only tells you the measurement of the spot you set it on. when I drop it in the gauge, it checks every dimension all at the same time.
I think I would get carpel tunnel in the thumb if I ran a dial caliper across every cartridge to check every measurement the case gauge checks for every cartridge!
to each his own, brother. Glad it works for you.
This thread will be the first to know if a case gauge ever fails me.

So hold on to your, " I told ya so's" it might be a while.

Danomite
 

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I don't have that kind of time....and I don't think it is as good of a failsafe.
If it fits, it shoots.
I use a caliper to check every piece of brass for AOL before and after trimming, COAL every 100 or so, and the crimp every 50.
other than that, every cartridge gets a run through the gauge.
a caliper only tells you the measurement of the spot you set it on. when I drop it in the gauge, it checks every dimension all at the same time.
I think I would get carpel tunnel in the thumb if I ran a dial caliper across every cartridge to check every measurement the case gauge checks for every cartridge!
to each his own, brother. Glad it works for you.
This thread will be the first to know if a case gauge ever fails me.

So hold on to your, " I told ya so's" it might be a while.

Danomite
Well, like I said, I had a case gauge fail on dozens of 308 cartridges. The fail was so bad that I couldn't even chamber them, let alone fire them. That's an epic fail. We threw the case gauge in the garbage.
 

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With My RUGER #1 - 45/70, bullet seating was an issue with the nose profile!!!!! A 355gr LBT (Lead Bullet Technology) wide flat nose bullet gave chambering issues while a 465gr WFN never did and never has.

The difference is the nose profile between the two in this situation, the LBT being fatter.

It is easy to check and adjust bullet seating depth for a given rifle and there is no need for fancy gauges to get er done.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 
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