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Paying $2 every time I work the lever, hurts more than my shoulder. What is it costing you guys to reload 100 shells with store bought bullets, are you in the $40 range. I know there are lots of variables, and that would be my other question, do you load to the most accurate and stick with it, whether its a hot or mild load? It seems with the wide range of bullet weights that accuracy would be out the window if you changed just some little things up. Who has the best brass, all my loaded shells are Hornady, so that's the brass I'll start with.
 

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Paying $2 every time I work the lever, hurts more than my shoulder. What is it costing you guys to reload 100 shells with store bought bullets, are you in the $40 range. I know there are lots of variables, and that would be my other question, do you load to the most accurate and stick with it, whether its a hot or mild load? It seems with the wide range of bullet weights that accuracy would be out the window if you changed just some little things up. Who has the best brass, all my loaded shells are Hornady, so that's the brass I'll start with.
Hey Oregon,

Using a commercially cast 405 gr LFP, 13.0 gr of Universal Clays, and a Federal 210 (in either W-W or Starline brass), it costs me $360/1,000.

Figure $40/M for primers. Two pounds of powder, at $20/lb. And $240/M for bullets. .45/70 Caliber Bullets Available From Penn Bullets

That would be thirty-six cents each.

A savings of $1.64, EACH!

Two hundred rounds, would easily pay for reloading tools.

RCBS, CH4D, Lyman, Redding, Dillon, H'Day, Sinclair, Midway......etc.

And if you keep your eyes peeled, you often can locate good used equipment at garage/yard/divorce/estate sales. And the local Rifle Club bulletin board (guys are always "upgrading")

My only suggestion, is to purchase the "best" tools, that you can afford. It is always more pleasurable, crafting quality ammo, with quality tooling.

Hope this helps.

Later, Mark
 

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I would not use the Hornady Brass Unless you plan to use the Gummy Tipped Hornady Bullets like they originally came with as the cases are shorter than normal.

You are correct there are many weights and styles of bullets for the 45-70 that can be purchased. To this end I would sit down and decide exactly what you plan to use your 45-70 for as that will greatly help in picking the weight and design of the bullet that would best suit your needs and pocket book. As bullets to a great percentage will change the cost per round of loaded ammo.

For Brass I would keep an eye on Starline Brass as they probably have the best prices as well as very good brass for the 45-70. I will also say that you will not need a whole lot of brass depending on how many you plan to shoot at a time as 45-70 brass can be loaded many times.

For Powder again it would greatly help to know what you plan to do with your 45-70 as that will help with powder selection to go along with the projectile that will be used. Again Powder can also have a great influence as to cost per loaded round.

As for Primers any standard Large Rifle Primer will do. Unless you have a Cowboy hammer spring or to say a lighter than stock hammer spring. Then you may have to only use Federal Primers as they have a softer cup.

For reloading components. I would first sit down and decide how much ammo you intend to use in say a month as that will help selecting a reloading press that will best suit your needs along with the other components that may be needed.

For most of the information requested it is not a fast or easy choice as the basis of this information starts with your wants and needs then the good people of the forum can help from there.
 

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Besides saving money, handloading, most times, tailors a load for better accuracy in your rifle.
 

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You're on the right track. Sit back and study on it til you think you've decided what you want and go for it. That's half the fun of reloading. I started out with a Lee Loader and it was a blast til I got to casting my own and needing to flare the case mouth for the larger bullet. There is a lot more to it once you get in to it. I doubt you'll save much money tho' since you'll be out there shooting twice, thrice, maybe quadruple as much.

Have fun and enjoy the BOOM!

Good Huntin'
Mop
 

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I buy most of "store bought" bullets & boolits from friends and from the various forums I belong to so I don't pay retail. For example, Remington 405 Sps with shipping will cost you about $0.50 a piece from Grafs, I paid 1/2 that the last time I bought some. I second the Starline brass, I have been using if for years in the 45-70 and a lot of other calibers and no complaints on my end. I paid $0.60 a piece for 50 new starline 45-70 about a month ago (off GB of all places). Below is the cost for the last 405 Rem Sp loads, I calculated the brass cost based on 20 reloads.

brass - 0.03
bullet - 0.25
powder - 0.20 (this can be a lot cheaper if you slow down the bullet and use a faster powder)
primer - 0.03

Fifty-one cents a round (if you get 20 reloads out of your brass) with a maximum LG pressure jacketed bullet. Shooting cast at lower velocities using faster powders and you can cut the price down a bit. I only buy primers in large lots so if you are buying locally in small quantities your cost will be higher, I actually pay a little less than 3 cents a piece for primers.

BB
 

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ok OS my take on this highly variable topic. got my reloading equipment for about $100- lee breechlock hand press, dies,powder dippers, factory crimp die and extra breechlock nuts. spent another $25 on a couple reloading books- loadbooks usa and lee second addition. cost of supplies about $40 plus shipping for 100 slugs, pound of h335 about $35, 100 primers about 5 bucks. brass was policed from previous factory ammo i had fired already. so total cost per round is about 75 cents right now in components but that will go down when you can afford to buy in bulk. now i will say it takes me a lot longer to reload than these others , BUT i am the rookie just getting started and i am using strictly hand tools only no bolted to a bench presses or machines. took me about 1 1/2 hours to reload 40 rounds but i was not in a hurry and was sitting at my desk in front of my, as msharley calls it, confuser:biggrin: while doing it! my advantage is portability. i have everything in an 8x10x16 inch box that i can pick up and walk away with. going to get a small tool bag for it all so i can reload right at the range or in the field. as for load work ups, well i did some book reading of course, but more importantly i read the info from these wonderful folks here and LISTENED, then asked my rookie questions and listened to the answers i received. i felt stupid at first but these fine folks were and are more than willing to educate the "greenhorns". i have passed on the info i have received to other non marlin members in my area, along with the safety warnings, and will continue to pass on what i am learning to others and keep learning from here! best of luck
kurtis
 

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Oregon Stihl, as other have pointed out already, you won't save money but you will be able to shoot lots more. You may also want to consider casting yur own slugs. The 45-70 is a round designed to shoot cast slugs. Marks favorite load of 13-14 grains of Universal Clays powder under a 405 grain slug does quite well and won't beat you up with recoil. Please do consider casting your own slugs, it fun also. Take care, keep us in the loop, John.
 

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Currently, my .45-70 Gov't. loading comprises a Remington 300 grain hollow point jacketed bullet (bulk from Midway in lots of 1000) and 25 grains of SR 4759. Cost per round is slightly under US $.30 per round. Of the $.30 per round, the bullet cost is about $.25. I shoot low pressure/low velocity Trapdoor loads and periodically anneal the brass, some of which I have reloaded in excess of 15 times. Besides the bullets, I also purchase primers and powder in large quantities also to lower shooting costs.
 

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Hey Oregon,

Using a commercially cast 405 gr LFP, 13.0 gr of Universal Clays, and a Federal 210 (in either W-W or Starline brass), it costs me $360/1,000.

Figure $40/M for primers. Two pounds of powder, at $20/lb. And $240/M for bullets. .45/70 Caliber Bullets Available From Penn Bullets

That would be thirty-six cents each.

A savings of $1.64, EACH!

Two hundred rounds, would easily pay for reloading tools.

RCBS, CH4D, Lyman, Redding, Dillon, H'Day, Sinclair, Midway......etc.

And if you keep your eyes peeled, you often can locate good used equipment at garage/yard/divorce/estate sales. And the local Rifle Club bulletin board (guys are always "upgrading")

My only suggestion, is to purchase the "best" tools, that you can afford. It is always more pleasurable, crafting quality ammo, with quality tooling.

Hope this helps.

Later, Mark

Great insight as usual Mark!

The suggestion to keep an eye out for garage/yard/divorce/estate sales is a GREAT suggestion. There are shooters out there that sell off their stuff for various reasons. I was at an Estate Auction yesterday and they sold off an RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Press for $85. They also sold off other reloading equipment but I didn't keep track of how much they were sold.

Also talk to friends and other shooters you know about reloading and see if you can consolidate your resources. I bought some reloaded ammo from a LGS that has a guy that reloads for a lot of his customers. I mentioned it to an officer in our American Legion Post and he told me to contact his brother, who has been reloading for almost 40 years. I called him up and he told me that he would be happy to reload for me provided I bought the stuff and I came over to his house so he could show me how to reload my own ammo. He has all the equipment and he said I can use it. He doesn't want any $$$ for it, just happy to pass along what he knows.

So the OP may not have to buy his own equipment, of if he decides he wants to have his own at home, he can always pick up used gear when it comes along.

The biggest issue I have found to reloading is being able to buy supplies at a fair price. I did the math on what it would cost a new RCBS starter kit (with their best press) plus powder, brass, primers, and bullets. YIKES its expensive. The reason I had been hedging is that I don't shoot so much that I want to invest that much $$$ into reloading. I had to find a way to do it cheaper. So hooking up with other people that already have the equipment and providing the resources may be the best option. I am not a spring chicken and jumping in with both feet $moneywise$ might not be a good investment for me.


Cheers!



Mike T.
 

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I cast my own bullets, so with the cost of primers, powder and cases, which can be used multiple times, it ends up costing about 15 cents a round, but it's not about saving money, it's about the consistency of the ammunition from round to round. There are a lot of variables over which you have control if you reload, and the quality of each round is better than factory. Please, get into reloading as fast as you can! It enables you to practice shooting more, and it keeps every shot from being so financially painful. Good luck!
 

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Yep, got that doketx. Once I can locate the supplies, I can use my buddy's equipment. He told me he prefers to load a box of ammo and then have me try it at the range. We can adjust the loads for the purpose that I am going to use it, so I can take advantage of various loads. Right now I am interested in lighter 30-30 rounds for sighting in a new scope and target practice.

Right now, I am checking around for the supplies.



Cheers!



Mike T.
 

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I have a spreadsheet I set up to figure costs per round. Currently mine run .812 cents per round or $16.24 for a box of 20. That does not include the initial cost I put out for the equipment but I've had my equipment for about 25 years so it has paid for itself many times over. My go to load is a 350 grain Hornady FP @ 1955 FPS using IMR4198 in a Winchester case. This load will do 3 shot cloverleafs at 100 yds in my 1895.

GG
 
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