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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well I left home in Northern NSW ten days ago and drove 2400 km (1500 miles) over the next 30 hrs to the Gulf of Carpentaria.

Packed my 444 with plenty of both factory ammo and my own loads.

My Favourite hunt was a solo walk along the banks an estuarine crocodile inhabited river in the late afternoon. This is the dry season where the rivers recede into diminishing waterholes where just months ago they joined to become an inland sea of water making its way to the waters of the Gulf.

This River still held long waterholes flanked by dry sandy overflow channels overgrown with vines and scrub. After a mile walk I came upon a pig 'pad', a well worn track ground to fine dust heading away from me. The 38 deg C (100 F) afternoon made my mouth as dry as the sand.

Then in the shade of a tree at 65 metres through the scrub and silhouetted against a patch of sunlight stood a large pig. Quickly lent against a sapling and put a 240gr soft point through his left shoulder shattering his leg and his vitals and dropping him on the spot.

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No running from a 444.

In the scrub 30m behind him broke a line a black pigs traversing a low ridge at speed, a mob of 8 or 10. Still on the sapling I swept that little 1.5-4.5 scope like a shotgunner along the line of black backs traversing away to the right and heard thuds and squeals as the 444 boomed.
Moved up to the first kill which was dead on the spot.
Spotted a juvenile boar at 100 metres slammed against a tree with a foot of gut oozing from the entry wound forward of his right hip.

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I also saw this effect the day before on another small pig hit as he dashed across my line at 25m. The 444 seems to deliver such a pressure wave that it blows innards back through the entry point.

As I turned away I caught movement out the corner of my eye and another large boar was struggling to his feet after I had caught him high in the back through the grass and trees mostly unsighted a few minutes earlier. Back along the mobs exit path just a few metres from me he turned and I smacked him with another round at close quarters. Bye Pig! image.jpg
 

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looks like the 444 grin might have had a workout ! half ya luck
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The 444 smile is welded to my face, Gus!
 

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Sounds like you had a great time. I can tell your in Australia by the last picture. :biggrin:
 

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Looks like you had a serious fun. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Good on ya WAGS !! Love your work mate... I gotta work my way up there sometime too! Some big *ssed pigs up there !! Mind the crocs though....:biggrin: See many Snakes while you were there ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah we had a 4m croc in the river just near our campsite. Luckily there was a 6m bank for 500m upstream and downstream! Not one snake to be seen, but we were certainly on the lookout for them.
 
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Wow, what an adventure, well written and well received. Makes me want to get my 444 out and chase a pig... Was any part of the oinker edible?

Ss
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow, what an adventure, well written and well received. Makes me want to get my 444 out and chase a pig... Was any part of the oinker edible?

Ss
Thanks Ss,

No we don't generally eat them, as carrion eaters feral pigs can have some pretty nasty diseases like hydatid cyst parasites, other worms and brucellosis. Some people catch younger ones alive with dogs or traps and them hold them for months, feeding on grain and deworming medicines.

Cheers
Wags
 

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Thanks for the info. Depending on size of the critter we usually save the tender loin and make sausage with the back strap. The larger pigs are too tough to do much else with.

Now, when does summer begin and how long does it stay? I have lots to learn about your great Country.
Ss
 
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