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Happy Thanksgiving to all you out there and a quick question, I have a 1977
Road surface Wood Asphalt Cone Gas


Marlin .444s model , I want to try Hornady Leverevolution ammo through it and the box says "for 1:20" twist.......is this safe/accurate to fire through this rifle and what did marlin change the barrel twist rates at some point? This is new to me, thank you.
 

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All you can do is give it a try. My 1980 .444S shot LE very well. This buck didn't agree, however.
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In my T4s I have found the groups open a bit in the slower, 1:38 twist, but they are still accurate enough for hunting. There is no danger using the ammo in different rifle twists, just a possible loss of accuracy. I’ve got no idea why Marlin slowed the twist rate. Probably saved $0.06 in manufacturing costs?
 

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When it was originally introduced, 240 and 265 projectiles were the design spec for the cartridge along with top speeds. The 1-38 twist is about the sweet spot for that, seems like... Only later, when people started putting slow 300+ grain bullets in the brass, arguably an equal use of the 444, did the issues start showing up. They sped the twist up to 1-20 later on to compensate for that developing preference, but then Remington took over and most JMs are the 1-38.

1-20 would have been fine from the start, but certainly 1-38 wasn't wrong for what is now considered the "mid weight" bullet loads they had in mind. Shrug. Hindsight is what it is.

People take a lot of moose each year with 265 grainers, so for anything less than grizzly... It's probably a non issue. I just wish Hornady still produced the flat points.

So it goes 😁
 

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I have a '77 as well as a friend of mine. Both obviously micro-groove. Mine loves the LE ammo his doesn't. No 2 rifles are the same. Mine at 100 yards. I haven't got back to the range to move my crosshairs left since fixing the cycling issue, but very happy with its accuracy. Prints better than my Remington 700 30.06
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1980 444S, 2013 Rizzini BR-550E
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1980 444S:
This ammo is a little unusual and was an attempt to reproduce the LeveRev round in long brass.
It's too long to load in the side of a Marlin but will load, one at a time, into the top.
It was meant for my break action Rizzini (also 1/38") which was factory regulated for the LeveRev cartridge.
The range is only 40 yards which is coincidentaly the distance of the range itself and the regulation range of the Rizzini.
However, this target was shot out of the Marlin mounted in a Lead Sled and is plenty accurate. More accurate than I am when freestanding.
I much prefer the FP 265 as it is way less hastle, but things being as they are these days, the FTX will do the job.
I have never had the FTX show any signs of instability out of any load in either of my 2 444's.

Be sure to clean your chamber well after shooting those shorty brass numbers.
Chamber burns and crud is the main reason I detest short brass and don't shoot specials in magnum revolvers anymore.
In fact I don't shoot magnum revolvers much at all anymore. :)

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When it was originally introduced, 240 and 265 projectiles were the design spec for the cartridge along with top speeds. The 1-38 twist is about the sweet spot for that, seems like... Only later, when people started putting slow 300+ grain bullets in the brass, arguably an equal use of the 444, did the issues start showing up. They sped the twist up to 1-20 later on to compensate for that developing preference, but then Remington took over and most JMs are the 1-38.

1-20 would have been fine from the start, but certainly 1-38 wasn't wrong for what is now considered the "mid weight" bullet loads they had in mind. Shrug. Hindsight is what it is.

People take a lot of moose each year with 265 grainers, so for anything less than grizzly... It's probably a non issue. I just wish Hornady still produced the flat points.

So it goes 😁
Not exactly...

A 1:38 twist is the “sweet spot” for 240 grain bullets and is adequate for 265 gr. Marlin and Remington (manufacturers of the original ammo for all 444 ammo) misjudged what the buying public would want.

When the T4 was introduced, faster lighter weight bullets were all the rage. Marlin and Remington expected there would be a demand for 240 grain and lighter, not 265 grain and above. Turns out, what shooters wanted was heavier bullets at faster speeds. Heavier, and thus longer bullets, need a faster rotation to stabilize at the same speeds shorter bullets do. Driving 300gr bullets fast is also pushing the pressure limit of Marlin actions. 240 grain ammo basically went extinct. Fast 265 grain and heavier is really the limit 1:38 microgroove and action can handle.
 
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