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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Many, many years ago I bought a Marlin .44 magnum rifle. I burned up a lot of ammo trying to find something that would shoot straight in the rifle. I failed. :cry: I had the gun looked at and nothing was found to be wrong with it. My groups at 100 yards were the size of a garbage can lid. :shock: It's true. I finally gave up and got rid of it. The episode scared me away from rifles using revolver calibers. To this day it still bugs me as to why that gun shot so lousy... I have a .45 revolver and would like to get a companion rifle to go along with it, but at todays prices I'd sure hate to get another "lemon" like the one I had. Anybody else run into this problem? I have owned a lot of rifles over the years and none have shot like that one did. That gun even put me off Marlins for 20 years.... I now own 336's but have not ventured back into the "cowboy" calibers..
 
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First question. Do you reload? If the answer is yes, a .45 or .44 can be made to shoot well.

The truth be told, I have both, (.44 is ballard, not microgroove) and the .44 is not as good a shooter as the .45, but ain't bad.

The .45 will shoot 1.5 inch groups at 100 yards. Marbles tang peep sight helps a bunch, as does the 24 inch octagon barrel.

The .44 wearing stock sights and the 20 inch round barrel, does maybe 3.5 to 4 inches at 100 yards.

Since ya already got a .45 revolver, I say go for a .45 and work up a load somewhere near 10 to 11 grains unique and a 250grain bullet.

If ya don't reload, go for a .44, as there is a wider variety of .44 special and .44 mag ammo to be had.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, I do a bit of reloading. I doubt that would of helped the rifle I owned. I put every brand of ammo made thru that gun to no good effect. If I remember right, at the time, I was wondering if it wasn't the rifling twist being to slow. A friend of mine had a .44 rifle of a different make and his shot like a dream. When we inquired we found that his rifling was a lot faster or tighter than my Marlin. I believe Marlin changed (what I have heard) the rate of twist since I owned that rifle. I wonder to this day if that wasn't a big portion of my problem.. Wish we had forums like this back then. Makes things a lot easier to find out about when all I got to do is tap into the "brain bank". :lol:
 
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From what I know, the current .44 is still a lazy twist that is just enough for a 240 grain bullet, and not quite enough for the heavier stuff.

The .45 on the other hand, is a 1 in 16 twist that is plenty. Might be part of why my .45 does better, along with the other reasons.
 

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An interesting way to look at it is :
If you want to shoot 180 to 240 gr. bullets go for the 44.
If you want to shoot 250 to 300 gr. bullets go for the 45.
Jim
 

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My 1894SS 44mag is a shooter. because of my old eyes I put a Red Dot scope on it & at 100 yards all 3 shots touch. I`m shooting 265gr. hornady JFP with 20gr of 2400. I could shoot this gun all day long. :D 444
 

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I have a 1894SS I have been shooting off and on since last September. I had some problems getting a decent group early on, but my most recent range visit is giving me 2.5 inch groups at 50yds and 5 inch groups at 100yds. That is with open sights. I have a williams peep sight(the one with click adjustments) to put on it that I hope will improve those numbers. Another thing that seems to have made a big difference is replacing the original trigger with an aftermarket one (wild west guns). I get similar groups with handloads and factory. It seems to like the 240gr the most, and the 180gr the least. Maybe you ran into a "monday morning" manufactured gun. :?
 
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