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I think the primary difference is cost. The cast are definitely less expensive and if you are set up to cast your own, they are more readily available.
 

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It really depends how 'jacked' the bullet is. If we are talking heavily jacked than that is definitely the best choice. The heavier the jacket the better the penitration.

Also, the big issue it how fast you can drive the bullet. The jackected bullet can be driven much faster that the hardcast, giving the advantage to the jacketed projectile as far as energy imparted; and probably with not much (if any) loss of penitration.

My instinct is to go jacketed..
 

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A cast bullet that large with a wide meplat of around 70% is going to be the most versatile. You can drive a 405 grain cast just as fast as jacketed if you know what you are doing. But it really isn't needed
 

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Unless that I could be guaranteed cast bullet penetration from the jacketed bullet.....mark me down for the cast bullet! Expansion means nothing.....if it doesn’t get to vital organs! memtb
 
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What does the OP mean by “do everything”? I hunted with .45-70s on and off for the 27 years I lived in the state, shooting “everything” from rabbit to brownie. I had zero problems using jacketed bullets - penetration was never an issue when using the right bullet. Why would anyone want to handicap himself with a single bullet for “everything”? The demands on a deer bullet are far different than those on a moose or brownie bullet for example. As handloaders we have the considerable advantage of being able to customize our ammunition to suit a specific need.

I used cast bullets on occasion in one .45-70 but found I could drive jacketed bullets faster with better accuracy (not that fine accuracy matters much for the big bears). I settled on two bullets in two loads - the 300 Hornady at ~2150 fps and the 350 Hornady at ~2050 fps. Never had a bullet failure, and only recovered one bullet from game. It’s still a free country and the OP is welcome to use whatever he wants, but armchair hunters who’ve never seen an Alaskan animal while hunting may not give the most informed advice. Then again so might not experienced Alaskan hunters…



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What does the OP mean by “do everything”? I hunted with .45-70s on and off for the 27 years I lived in the state, shooting “everything” from rabbit to brownie. I had zero problems using jacketed bullets - penetration was never an issue when using the right bullet. Why would anyone want to handicap himself with a single bullet for “everything”? The demands on a deer bullet are far different than those on a moose or brownie bullet for example. As handloaders we have the considerable advantage of being able to customize our ammunition to suit a specific need.

I used cast bullets on occasion in one .45-70 but found I could drive jacketed bullets faster with better accuracy (not that fine accuracy matters much for the big bears). I settled on two bullets in two loads - the 300 Hornady at ~2150 fps and the 350 Hornady at ~2050 fps. Never had a bullet failure, and only recovered one bullet from game. It’s still a free country and the OP is welcome to use whatever he wants, but armchair hunters who’ve never seen an Alaskan animal while hunting may not give the most informed advice. Then again so might not experienced Alaskan hunters…



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I'm just looking to consolidate my reloading supplies and focus on one load per caliber. Mostly for time and moneys sake. My SBL is my main hunting rifle (though i love my 375 dearly). I have a very accurate load with 400gr speers and 405gr cast performance
 

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I'm just looking to consolidate my reloading supplies and focus on one load per caliber. Mostly for time and moneys sake. My SBL is my main hunting rifle (though i love my 375 dearly). I have a very accurate load with 400gr speers and 405gr cast performance

You could do far worse than one bullet for everything.....provided that that bullet will work in the worst case scenario! There’s potentially nothing worse than having the “wrong” bullet at a critical time! A slow (er) kill with a cast, trumps a “no kill” with a failed jacketed bullet!

Obviously, you must make the determination! memtb
 

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Whats the advantages and disadvantages of each? Trying to decide between the two for my do everything alaska bullet
Depending on the alloy or jacket thickness, you will most likely not see much expansion. Unless you go with a 12 BHN and gas check HP bullet, you are going to have a through and through wound.

A wide meplat is the most critical if hard cast.

Or, check out GT Bullets. They have a very good quality bullet using 94-3-3 that is around 12-13 bhn with both a hollow point and wide meplat option. Don't overlook their 320gr range options as well. All of the offerings have a wide HP or FN wide meplat. More velocity will help expansion.
 
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I shoot 465gr cast with a wide flat meplat in my SBL with excellent accuracy. The deer and elk can attest that it is a complete pass through and deadly round. I wouldn't be afraid to hunt anything in North America with this round. Do I drive it as fast as I can? Nope, it's not needed. And with a gas check on them there is very little clean up. So there is my vote.
 

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A heavy cast bullet with a wide meplat can be driven as fast as a jacketed bullet, while providing more penetration if the alloy is of a decent composition. I dont buy the myth of hydrostatic shock. Air in, air out, blood in, blood out, and complete pass thru of the vitals is what kills game quickly. A heavy cast bullet will all but insure this and I've been fortunate enough to witness it on more than one occasion. The wide meplat will make sure you're shoving enough tissue out of the way to have a large temporary wound cavity but the plus side is it comes without all the blood shot meat.
 

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. . . I have a very accurate load with 400gr speers and 405gr cast performance.[/QUOTE]

Interestingly, of all the bullets I shot through my Classic Model 1895, my two most accurate loads are also with the 400-grain Speer and the Cast Performance 405-grainer with gas check. I drive them both at 1,800 fps. I've killed deer with both. As an all-round bullet for Alaska, I'd lean toward the Cast Performance, but I'm just a deer hunter from Ohio with no bear/moose experience, so a bigger-than-deer expert I ain't!
 
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