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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1957 39A Golden that is leaving spent caseings in the chamber. The ejector and extractor has been replaced. With the gun taken totally apart the case still needs to be tapped out and can feel the tight fit. Any Ideas?
 

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Are there shiney marks on the casing? A gun that old may have had prolonged diet of "Shorts" at one point, causing an errosion of the chamber wall. Why it would suddenly manifest itself now, though, is beyond me. Usually if it's a problem, it has always been a problem. What ammo are you using? If it's high speed, try switching to Standard Velocity and see if that helps. (Or visa-versa. See if it makes a difference.)

On another tack, did you fit the extractor, or just replace it? It will eject a live round OK? If not, see that the claw is making a full trip over the rim when the bolt is closed. Oftener than not, new extractors need fitting.

Good luck! ~Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. I just replaced the extractor. But it looks a pretty good fit. Just loading the the gun fully and pumping them out with the lever it does not fail. Have tried several different types of ammo CCI mini mags, Federal bulk, some standard Velocity Remington, and Remington Golden bulk bullets and they all seem to hang in the chamber after being fired. There is no blow back on the case of the Federal and CCI but the Remington show some (that I think is just due to cheap ammo). I have soaked the barrel several times with Hoppe's 9 and let sit for 15 minutes or so and worked it over with the brush (allot down by the breech). I bought this 2 years ago and it always did it every now and then, but now it is almost every time. There are no real marks on the cases except about a 1/16 or less down by the rim, and that goes all the way around (not heavy scratches though). I noticed that with the spent case stuck in the barrel, and the gun apart, with a cleaning rod I have to tap it a bit to just break it free. It is like the case is swelling, even though you look at it and no noticable deformation of the case.

I am betting you are right on the chamber wall errosion. Is there any fix?
 

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A friend of mine had the same problem with his BSA Martini.
Turned out to be where the firing pin had been hitting the action where he kept on dry-firing it. The top of the chamber had been peened making it swell and hold the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sound like a good idea. Will look at that more closely.
Thanks much
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well I finally got at tool to clean up the chamber from firing pin damage. Still have same problem. It only hangs on spent caseings. Is there anything that can be done for the chamber??
 

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I had a gunsmith sleeve a badly eroded chamber on an old Winchester pump. IIRC, the job cost me around 75 bucks. He's a good man with a lathe- a dying breed that sets up and works by hand.

What this job does is ream out the eroded chamber, and install a turned down section of 22 barrel. It's either epoxied or soft soldered in, then reamed to spec, and the extractor slot cut. He tells me this job is easiest done on a threaded in barrel like the 39-A, and others.

Andrew can probly give you some of the finer details. Depending on your situation, a new barrel may be about the same cost as a sleeve job.... something to check into anyways.

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just A Note: Talked with Marlin and due to it's a 1957 they will not re-barrel it.
 

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Sleeving the chamber is the best recourse. The job is done just as described above. The other option is to re-line the barrel. I have done a bit of relining but don't like the quality of commercial liners so I make my own by turning down old barrels from some of the cheap Winchester, Savage, Marlin, or Mossberg .22 single shots that can be had cheaply at the local gun shops. I'd chuck up the barrel and turn it down a couple of inches at a time until it got to the proper diameter. It's tedious work but worth it, I think. Of course, the quality of commercial liners might have improved over the last 20 years, but I never wanted to take the chance: Once the liner is epoxied into place it's there! (Parker Hale used to sell choke-bored liners for .22's. Oh Man! Those were the best liners you could buy. Long gone now, I'm afraid.)

Once you decide that something radical needs to be done -and that you've committed to doing it- pull the barrel and do a chamber cast. If the chamber is pitted you might try polishing it. At that point it can't hurt.

There is one other option from a machining standpoint, and I can't vouch for it beyond a friend's word that it worked for him. A friend had a Steven's target .22 that shot exceptionally sell but wouldn' t extract due to a rough chamber. His solution was to make a tiny tool that would allow him to flute the rear half of the chamber ala H&K assault rifles. In use, the barrel was held in a stationary lathe chuck and the tool run into the chamber by the carriage, .001" at a time for a few passes. The chuck was then indexed a suitable amount and the process repeated until an equal number of flutes were cut. The operation was "deburred" with a Craytex polishing rod. The idea was to cut down on the pitted surface area and in his case it worked. I'm sure he only used standard velocity ammo. I never saw the rifle or the fired cases but he said the procedure worked fine and restored life to his rifle. It makes sense but I've never done it. You can take this under advisement, though.

Good luck with your rifle. I hope you get it back into shooting trim. ~Andrew
 

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Marlin may not do the work- they seem to be increasingly liability conscious these days- just a sign of the times.

It's also possible your chamber is "Short-ringed"- from heavy use of .22 short cartridges. A hands on appraisal by a gunsmith would be your best bet. Explain the problem to him, and he will likely come up with a solution that will get your rifle shootin agin, be it a sleeve, reline, or rebarrel. There are 39-A barrels available through Numrich if the need for one should arise. The 'smith will be able to set the barrel to the proper headspace after the repair work is done- something usually beyond the scope of the do it your selfer....

As far as liners go, the Redman commercial liners sold through Brownell's and others are fairly good- I have no complaint with the one in my old Marlin pump....

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the info folks. I am going to show it to a gunsmith and see what he could do. Due to old age my eyes aren't as good as they used to be. Borrowed a large magnifying lense and looked at some caseings. Seen where there is some case swell (looks like as little mole hill) right underneath the point where the extractor hits. It cuts the case lip by about 70%, and the little mound is what is catching the case as it tries to extract. After seeing the price of new barrels ($50 range), I think you guys are right that it might be cheaper and more life for the gun for the money with a new barrel. Well I guess I'll see what the gunsmith says.
 
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