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I shot my new to me 375 yesterday. I has an old Nikon 3-9x40 on it with low mounts. I got 200g Sierra PJFP ammo from a reloading co. that I won't name because of my misreable results, which are probably not their fault.

I shot 5 rounds off a bench, from a lead sled. The result was a 9" group at 100'. I shut everything down, went home and made sure everything was tight, and relaxed the barrel band. I'll try again soon, as soon as the rain stops, and let you know the result.

My bore looked good, and the gun appears clean.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.
 

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Normally to make these shoot well, you need to handload. Normally ( I use this word because it is what most do, not at all gospel.) the Hornady 220 FP is the projectile of choice and Reloader 7 is the powder of choice. Cast bullets usually shoot well when sized fat. I just size mine .379 to be compatable with my .38-55s and that size shoots well.

Keep plugging away at it. Do a search on the M375. Lots of info has been posted, lots of MOs have the M375s
 

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The problem remains that while all Marlin M-375's share a lot of commonalities, they're still all a little different, and have to be treated as individuals. While most prefer longer-shanked bullets to short ones, and some shoot cast bullets better than jacketed, there are always exceptions. Mine also preferred the 220-grain Hornady to the Sierra 200, but didn't seem to really like any cast bullets under 265 grains.

The process continues. 8)
 

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I've not used 200-gr in my Marlin, only 220-gr, with excellent accuracy.

In the very beginning of my .375 career I had horrible luck with 200-gr in my WinBB, then switched to 220-gr with excellent results.
I don't reload and now get my ammo from only two sources:
1. wisconsin cartridge
2. Ten-X Ammunition reloads the brass (220-gr Hornady bullets and 36.0-gr of RL-7).

Cheers,

Carl
 

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Greetings
Well now that you have a 375 you really should consider reloading. Those factory boxes of ammo are going to add real fast.
For the price of about 100 you could get set up real nice with the basics. Reloading is easy and safe. I have been around it (my dad) and have been since I was a little feller. Gotmy first dies when I was 15 for a 32 win special Marlin 336.
I like to think all the shooting I have been able to afford because I reload has been a real asset. Plus all my equipment is a valuable asset now.
 

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You might take a good look at the crown and make sure it's not damaged. Even the tiniest nick can cause major problems. I also have a new-to-me M375 that I've never gotten to shoot to my "Marlin expectations", but your situation sounds worse.

Handloading may be a real help here if you are so inclined. As was mentioned, I also recommend trying some longer bullets; the 220 Hornady is a nice one. I've had good, though somewhat inconsistent results w/ RL-7, and it is a favorite powder for most 375 owners. Reading some of PJ's posts, I plan to try I- or H-4895 next.

Best of luck getting it to shoot well.
 

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In my 1980 Model 375, I have only shot the factory Winchester 200gr load. Very respectable accuracy with my Bushnell Elite 3200 2 x 7. About 1 1/2 groups at 100 yds. Thats plenty accurate for my as most of my shots in PA are under 100 yds anyway. I need to use a scope nowdays. I plan on reloading for this round and have purchased everything I need to do so. The only thing I really need is TIME to do this, never enough.
 

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My Model 375 with a Nikon Prostaff 2-7X32 will shoot 1" 3 shot groups with Winchester 200 grain factory ammo @ 100 yards with a cool barrel. With a smoking hot barrel it will will stay under 2". These weren't cherry picked groups. They were the first 2 100 yard groups I shot. The one on the right included a 4 click adjustment to move the other 2 into the black.

 

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I use the Hornady 220Gr over 32.5Grs of IMR 4198 for a chrono'd velocity of 2113 FPS. This load will easily produce 2" (5) shot groups at 100 yards. The rifle is an early Model 375 with a Leupold 1-4X Vari X II scope set at approx 2.75 power, or just high enough power that the front sight is out of focus.

A lot of things could contribute to your poor groups Technique on the bench and type of rests used. Keep the front rest at the front of the receiver NOT on the barrel........Trigger, A trigger that is too high in pull wt. or has a lot of creep is hard to work with........I tune my triggers to 4-4.5 LBS with NO creep. A forearm that fits too tightly can influence the bore center line from shot to shot. Scope and mounts also play a part, if the scope is mounted too high, a good repeatable sight picture is hard to attain,and depending on the scope, parallex comes into the equation too. Clean the bore.......But foul the bore with 2 or 3 rounds before you actually start shooting for groups.......Spotlessly clean barrels usually don't produce the best groups.

Now , take all the above and wrap it all together......the bench, the trigger, the technique, the scope and its components, the forearm fit (remove it to get it out of the equation) The weather, and the ammo and work thru each part to insure it is correct..............The Rifle is capable much more than you're getting, so the answer lies somewhere within the components of the tests.

As another poster stated Handloads seem to work best for most 375 owners, probably 'cause 375 ammo is $$ and sort of scarce.....I've never shot 375 factory ammo. I hand load for all my firearms. Hand loaded ammo needs to be precise. The brass needs to be trimmed to the correct length and The relationship of the bullet to the rifling is important too. Check the chamber depth, and seat the bullet so it is .010-.015 Max off the lands....touching the lands will allow higher pressures on ignition, and you don't want pressures to vary when your looking for groups. Powder measure also needs to be accurate......weigh each power drop before pouring it into the case.......in other words, do everything you can, to build Match Grade ammo for your tests.


Good Luck, I think you'll find the answer on your next range session, if you re-think some things and make one or two small changes.


Tom
NRA LIFE
 

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Looking back on my load notes, my best target group with the 375 was a 5 shot group at 100 yards that measured .715. It was the 220 grain Hornady load with 35.4 grains of RL-7. My problem is being consistent. My next group with the same load was 2.655. I always seem to get a flyer and blame it on my own inability as a shooter, not the rifle.

I have never shot any factory ammo in my 375. I started with the Hornady 220 grain and then went to cast and haven’t gone back to the jacketed bullets. I just enjoy the cast too much.

If you don’t reload you need to start because you are missing out on a lot of fun and as Missionary said the cost of the ammo if you shoot much will add up fast. Then if you get into casting your own you will save even more and enjoy the sport more.
 

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I got 3 boxes of ammo and the rifle for $525.00 that's the only way I can afford to shoot it.
 

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The concensus seems to be that if you want to shoot jacketed bullets into little bitty groups, get the Hornady 220-grain load and go shoot it, either in factory ammo, commercial reloads, or home-brewed stuff.

I'm not there yet, but I'm convinced that I can get cast boolits to shoot nearly as well as jacketed, I'm under an inch at 50 yards already, I just need to refine the load and stop switching components.

Nightfisher, I decided long ago that when I'm having a day like you described when consistency is lacking, to just walk away from it for a half hour. Go shoot a 22 or some mild handguns, and get back into focus. I can shoot off a bench all day, but I can only concentrate on it for about five minutes at a time. ::)

A man's got to know his limitations. 8)
 

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papajohn said:
A man's got to know his limitations. 8)


PJ, You know better than to make a statement like that....................You have NO limitations with Firearms!....... I can tell from your imformative posts ;D ;D ;D

Aw Jeez,....... It's raining here.....I canceled a trip to the rangetoday ..I guess I should go do something productive like clean my loading bench.

Have a good day PJ.........

Tom
 

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I believe cleaning off a loading bench is very therapeutic...........at least that's what I've heard. Besides, you never know what you might find. Or in 35remington's case, he never knows what might find him. 8)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I went back to the range to try again, after checking tightness of scope and stock/action, and barrel band. I didn't have to make much adjustment, so I was suprised when my 100' groups, with the same ammo, shrunk to about 3". I guess little things matter a lot.

Now I'm trying to move that group over to the bullseye, and you know how old scopes crosshairs can be "sticky". After adjustment, I think it takes the recoil from a couple of rounds to allow the scope to settle-in.

I'm not at the bullseye yet, but think I'll eventually get to 2" groups on the bullseye. Then I'll get the Hornady 220g Interlock FP bullets and see if I can get better.

Thanks.
 

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Glad to hear that it did good for you Tgallen. There's nothing like the feeling of acomplishment when you get a rifle shooting better after being discusted at the start. Good luck.
 

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You have received several good sugestions to work with along with "proven" good loads.
I would make one aggition that works for me.
Set asside the Lead Sled. I have found many rifles of two piece stock desings do not like to be held firmly into front and rear bags. My best groups usually come from a technique of no rear bag. Rest the forearm just at the front of the receiver where the metal and wood meet. Hold the rifle as if you were fireing from a sitting deer stand position. That is hold the forearm firmly pulled back into the shoulder. Place your right elbow onto the bench top, this is your rear rest. do not jerk the trigger. apply smooth even trigger preasure until the shot breaks as a surprise. In pistol shooting this term is given as your minumume arch of movement. you will be slightly less than rock steady, but your results, especially after practice will amaze.
Good luck.
Guzziac,
Richard P.
 

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Has the 220 gr Hornady bullet come available? For a long time, no one had them. I have several boxes of 200 Sierra.
 

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Mine hates the 200gr Sierras. No better than 3" at 100 yards. It will put the 220gr Hornady into 1.25" consistently however. The .375 has never been quite as accurate as my other Marlins but still shoots good enough with the 220gr for 300 yard deer. reflex264
 
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