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Quick question. Looking at a post war Model 36. Barrel is marked as an A (24 inch rifle model), but it is configured as 20 inch barrel, with 3/4 length barrel and fore end cap (a 36SC?). It is probably an A cut down by a smith, if so the work is high grade. I do know that Marlin put ADL barrels on As and vice versa. Does anybody know if Marlin ever miss- stamp a 20 inch barrels as an A model, or factory shorten A barrels ? Cuz if this is original and uncut it would be good for the collection.
 

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I don't get into the weeds as much as some, but I have noted that Marlin has not been beyond digging through the parts box and using what was available. The 36 in particular was made for a short while after the war. I would expect it got things going again while they set up for the new era of the 336. A lot of companies had to refocus their efforts back to civilian production after the war. I have seen every indication of incorporating parts available. Many of the 36s are more than a little rough in the machining. I'm concluding this was an effort to retool, get back into smooth production, and use parts that had been in storage for a few years. One would expect, they may have even lost employees to the war. Even those that came back may have moved to a different line of work. In that regard, I find it a unique and collectable rifle.

All that being said, you are correct. A rifle that old, could have had anything done to it. A good smith doesn't leave behind any more evidence of work than the factory smith did.

I like all my Marlin's regardless of their assorted past.

Who knows, maybe our grandchildren will be collecting these early Remilns because of the uniqueness they possess during the transition of machining techniques...
 

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Quick question. Looking at a post war Model 36. Barrel is marked as an A (24 inch rifle model), but it is configured as 20 inch barrel, with 3/4 length barrel and fore end cap (a 36SC?). It is probably an A cut down by a smith, if so the work is high grade. I do know that Marlin put ADL barrels on As and vice versa. Does anybody know if Marlin ever miss- stamp a 20 inch barrels as an A model, or factory shorten A barrels ? Cuz if this is original and uncut it would be good for the collection.
I have a 20 inch barrel here but it looks very original. I think that was still original.
 

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I also have a 336A waffle top with a 20" barrel, also have a 336SC waffle top, and that barrel is actually an inch or so shorter...Both .35 Remington, both receiver sights, one Williams, one Lyman... they are both original and were bought new by family members many years ago!
 

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I also have a model 36A with 24" barrel built in '46 the barrel is marked 36ADL the rifle has no checkering and is all original. I do believe that Marlin was using anything they had to get back into production. As mentioned earlier the machining on the inside of mine is quite rough but it is still very smooth and accurate.
 

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Oh yeah very common to see model 36 with bbl bands covering the stampings also.
 

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Thanks to SWANY, been seeing a lot of rifles with barrel band covering writing, & wondered if these guns were put together. Any extra value?
 

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Thanks to SWANY, been seeing a lot of rifles with barrel band covering writing, & wondered if these guns were put together. Any extra value?
They were "Put together" at Marlin just the way you see them now...

I have a 1st year 336 RC with exactly this same configuration... Barrel band right over the roll markings....

The story goes that Marlin was super "Thrifty" ... Cheap if you prefer... so they used up ALL the old parts if they were good...

For example - the very early 336 RC's had roll marks under the barrel bands because they were all roll marked for a SC under barrel short tube mag configuration - then they realized there would be a barrel band.... No problem - just put the barrel band over the roll marks... Let me tell you - it suffers no accuracy deficit what-so-ever... Mine shoots < 3/4" all day long...

Another example - The 1st 2 years of 336's used 36 bottom metal (Levers and lever plates) and '36 stocks... Apparently to use them up... "Normal" 336 stocks don't fit them - but 36 stocks go right on.... (I have never heard of a '36 with later 336 bottom metal and stock used from the factory - but it wouldn't surprise me in the least bit to find out that some shipped this way...)

Another example - even though they talk of the 36 production ending when the 336 came on - you see records of model 36 sales for a year or 3 after the 36 "Ended".... Just using up old stock....

You have to remember - this was a time when Material costs were relatively high and labor costs were very low... so using extra labor to utilize materials made perfect sense....

Thanks
 

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I remember the shortages resulting from the war effort. There had been four years of no new guns, cars, and lots of other things. Our family 12 guage double had self destructed in the early war years, so we only had a single shot .22. Our car also went belly up. Fortunately a wealthy friend had a '41 Chevy pickup. He could not get enough gasoline to feed it and his car, so he sold us the truck.

When the war ended, the demand for consumer goods was so high that items were often clamored for that were of lesser quality. This persisted until about 1952 with vehicles.

Our own own experience with vehicles reflected this. A '48 Ford block cracked at low mileage. A '49 Chevy ran down the road at a serious angle. A really nice '51 Mercury cost $3150 and was hard to find. I wrecked it in '53 and the situation was more like normal and the replacement '53 cost only about $2400.

It was the same with guns. Remlin could have sold a lot of them. Marlin quality wasn't that great either. Makers used everything. Winchester's transition Model 70 resulted from a change, but one that could use stockpiled parts with minor changes.

My my own pre-war 70 is well used , but accurate. Collector value is gone. I am contemplating having the safety reversed to make the fire position forward as were later models.
 

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Unless you have factory documentation that the subject gun in question was shipped with a 20" barrel, then it's an "A" barrel that's been cut; and although entertaining and great information to have, all the above comments are otherwise irrelevant to this piece. If you dig thru the thousands of posts here you will find that members routinely make posts pertaining to shortening barrel lengths on various models to include the 24" barrel on a number of "A" models. And if members here perform that modification, how many have been shortened that one will never hear about? My recommendation, if you choose to buy the gun, is to base your offer on the fact that the barrel may likely have been after-market shortened; as I can assure you that the next buyer with any knowledge will do so should you later decide to sell/trade. If it is an authentic "SC" model you want; then go for an original as good examples are always available.
 

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Another 24" 1947 production ADL with a plain walnut stock here. Very nice gun, all original except for a Williams receiver sight.
 
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