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How much shooting have you done with your rifle in its current chambering? In what situations do you think the extra power is needed?
 

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Yes you can have the 35 rem rechambered to the 356 win. My father and father-in-law had it done.I have a 336ER marlin that came factory in the 356 win. So its not to much gun for the 336 action.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
35rem, all just close in whitetail huntin. the extra power needed? moose, bear, elk in timber. just curious on if it could be done
 

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I like the 356win. round ,but for most huntin the 35 Rem. will do fine ,the 200gr. Rem. Cor-Lokt opens up a penatrates wonderfully !
I've taken black bears hogs and whitetails with the 35 Rem. and the 356win. and I really couldn't tell any diff. naver recovered bullets with ethier.
I've got a ole 35 Rem. that has been used all over North America it has taken four Big Elk ,according to the pervious owner it was coined the "Killin Machine"
 

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Whitetail and black bear are easily handled by the .35 Remington as is. For moose and elk in timber, how about a .444 or better yet, a 45-70? Ammo for the .356 will be harder to get in the future, as there were not many guns made for it. Someday you might be faced with a choice. If you are a handloader, then a .356 is a possibility.

If you do not handload, though, better pass on a .356. The bullets available in factory loads do not bring out the best in the caliber, and factory ammo is made infrequently. It is very expensive and hard to find.
 

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The difference in the 35 and 356 is the range. The 356 is a true 200 yard caliber, the 35 is not.

You can rechamber the 35 to accept a 356 cartridge but it will not be a true 356, the barrel twist of the two calibers are not the same. But it will work.

35 Remington is 1 in 16" twist
356 Winchester is 1 in 12" twist

djh
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i do handload, the barrel twist is good info, now about that 444 or 45/70 i will buy one in a heartbeat if the right one comes my way.

it;s not something i wanted to run out and do just curious on if it could be done.

thanks for the info guys
 

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Since you reload, you may want to look over at the beartooth bullet site. You can make notable conservative improvements on the 35 Rem. Normally you attain 2150fps with a 200 gr rem core-loct and Varget. Compared to the 1800-1900 fps factory 200 gr loads the "warmed up" loads make it a whole different gun. They effectively increase the range to where turning it into a 356 is a mout point. My memory just went blank, but there are commerical loads availble that are noticebly hotter than my load. So, have fun!!!!
 

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The 35 Remington cartridge is loaded to about 28,000 lbs pressure. The Marlin receiver can withstand much higher pressure. A lot of people reload higher than reloading manuals maximum. We refer to the higher pressure shells as 35+. A 200 grain bullet factory shell averages about 1975 ft/sec from my 35. My 200 grain bullet 35+ loads average 2225 ft/sec. There is not enough difference to justify rechambering the rifle.

The only problem that I have with a 35 Marlin being a 200 yard gun is the accuracy. There is no dought that it will kill at 200 yards. I have owned three 35 Marlins and none of them would hold a good group at 200 yards. All that I am saying is, if you want a 200 yard gun, you need to purchase a gun designed for shooting 200 yards. Marlins are designed to be light, easy to carry, and easy to handle in brush. Marlins are designed for short to medium range. Marlins have low recoil due to slow bullet speed and shot round nose bullets that open up at low velocities. They are designed beautiful for their intended purpose.
 
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Taylor said:
The 35 Remington cartridge is loaded to about 28,000 lbs pressure. The Marlin receiver can withstand much higher pressure. A lot of people reload higher than reloading manuals maximum. We refer to the higher pressure shells as 35+. A 200 grain bullet factory shell averages about 1975 ft/sec from my 35. My 200 grain bullet 35+ loads average 2225 ft/sec. There is not enough difference to justify rechambering the rifle.

The only problem that I have with a 35 Marlin being a 200 yard gun is the accuracy. There is no dought that it will kill at 200 yards. I have owned three 35 Marlins and none of them would hold a good group at 200 yards. All that I am saying is, if you want a 200 yard gun, you need to purchase a gun designed for shooting 200 yards. Marlins are designed to be light, easy to carry, and easy to handle in brush. Marlins are designed for short to medium range. Marlins have low recoil due to slow bullet speed and shot round nose bullets that open up at low velocities. They are designed beautiful for their intended purpose.

Hmmm...,there's a couple mule deer from the hills of the Chihuahuan desert in south Texas that might have just been fooling with me, but they seemed convinced that my Marlin is a 200 gun yard.

Not to dispute your description above of what you think a Marlin is supposed to be, but from the 200yd line, my 336ER/.356Win can print 3" groups all day long with factory 200gr and 250gr ammo.

Maybe it was designed for those 30yd deep-wood shots, but it turns out to be a damned reliable 200yd gun.
 

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FWiedner, not to disagree with you, but I was talking about a 35 caliber Marlin. Comparing a 356ER with a 1 in 12" twist to a 35 with a 1 in 16" twist is like comparing apples and oranges. If you can find a good 356ER for under $800, you should buy it. The last one I saw on Auction Arms sold for $1200. Another good 200 yard 35 caliber gun is a 358 Browning lever action. It has a 20 inch barrel, just as light, easy to handle in brush, has better balistics than a 356ER, and cost a lot less.
 
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