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.380 is a good choice as backup.
The .380 is a little small as a "backup" in the woods, for me......
I'd sooner have a little Sig P-938 9MM as a backup in a hiking situation, if I thought it was needed............It's in my back pocket most of the time, anyway...........
But then, I don't think "Back Up" when I'm in the woods...........I'm apt to carry the Delta Elite on my belt and the Woodsman MT in my pack for Grouse (and they're getting scarce!) or Squirrels as I've done in the distant past,...........But now, at 73................I don't have interest in Squirrels or Grouse, so I just have one pistol and some extra ammo/mags..........

Tom
 

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since my job takes me into the woods a bit, I suppose you could call my favorite daily carry a "woods gun". I've always found it prudent to carry some type of side arm on many of the properties I survey ... mainly for snakes, but there is always the possibility of having to deal with a rabid critter. We used to even encounter the occasional looney hobo in the woods near the R/R on the outskirts of a nearby town .... and the dope grower's MJ patch in the clearing in the middle of forest land. Down here in NE Texas we aren't apt to deal with bear, moose, wolf, etc., so prepping for that possibility isn't really necessary. Other than two legged scum, the only additional normal threat is the feral hogs, and actually having an encounter with them is sort of a remote possibility. That narrows it down mainly to snakes, rabid critters, or someone's loose idiot pit bull type mongrel. So, I've always carried a wheel gun in the field to have the option of carrying 1 or 2 shotshells in the first two holes during our short 8-9 month snake season and the rest hardballs. I carried inexpensive, blued .38 spl j-frames for lots of years but got downright tired of having to detail clean them 2-3 times per week. Even though the .38 spl did what it needed to do, rain, sweat, mud and blood just aren't good on blued handguns. When I ran across a steal of a deal on a "like new" Ruger SP-101 (.357 stainless) about 10 years ago, it instantly became my #1 companion. Actually, buying that particular gun was what finally prompted me into re-loading a short time later. It's still about being able to load up those most possibly needed shot shells for the snakes and still having 3-4 better suited hardball rounds for the possibility of the bigger critters.

Now, IF I was in bear country, I'd be taking a serious look at the 10 mil (just not too serious - my digitally challenged hands just don't fit the handle of them big grip things)


jd
 

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Carried a Charter Arms Bulldog in .357 for years because of the light weight. Kicked the biggest black bear I have ever seen out of his bed one time and at 30ft I felt completely under gunned. Fortunately the bear just sauntered off. These days I carry a hot loaded 1911 (45 super). If I ever get to wander big bear country a 450 bushmaster would let me feel a little more comfortable.
 

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When I read .357 vs. 10mm it struck me first as a question of revolver vs auto. With few exceptions the .357 is a revolver cartridge and the 10mm an auto cartridge. And about those exceptions, you can get a revolver in 10mm but if you are going to carry something as big as a S&W N-frame into the woods wouldn't .44 Mag or .45 Colt be a better caliber choice? The same goes for a .357 auto. Why carry something as big as an automag that only shoots a .357 bullet? So, in this debate, one's preference for the revolver or the auto may be all you need to decide between .357 or 10mm. I've owned a couple of N-frames, even shot them in competition. But for portability, magazine capacity, and rapidity of aimed follow-on shots (firepower) I choose to carry an auto into the woods.

Let's consider a woods caliber. For the men in Ohio and Connecticut above their .22 rimfires may just be the thing. But for someone who lives in the Pacific Northwest a .22 doesn't cut it. Aside from any potential human threat, we have to deal with the possibility of running into wolves, cougar, black bear, and even a rare, but possible, grizzly. Both .357 and 10mm could handle those (big bear marginal) and I wouldn't want anything smaller. I once shot a deer twice with a .45 acp and it did die - eventually. I'd rather not have to wait for an angry cougar or bear to succumb. Therefore, I choose to give the nod to the bigger bullet of the 10mm.

My woods weapon is a Kimber Longslide in 10mm. I like flap holsters for brush and woods so I had a custom holster made in the style of the military M12. The military M12 was too short for my 6" 1911. My holster incorporates the same hardware as the M12. And, like the M12 version the flap on my holster can be removed and a thumb break strap installed in its place.

10mm Kimber 6" Stainless LS 1911 with custom M12 type holster:
View attachment 761093
i agree long slide 10 mm nice choice
 

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We own a timber tract in rural S.C. When I go down there to work, which is often, I am always carrying a side arm. I am a revolver guy to the bone but you hate getting a nice revolver with a leather holster soaked in sweat. So when it's really hot I find myself carrying a Glock in a kydex holster. I must say Glocks are amazingly rust resistant and reliable. In fact I may start looking for another police trade in Glock while the looking is good.

My favorite handgun cartridge is the .357 but it's easy to see why the 10MM is a popular choice. My preference for the .357 is based my love of revolvers, on not having to grovel around looking for my brass, easy of reloading and that I have two carbines in the caliber.
 

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I am not sure if caliber is as much a problem for the woods gun as ease of carry, and you are comfortable shooting. I like to wonder around the farm with my Ruger SBH 7 inch barrel but if I am working I prefer my xd-45, it can take abuse. I have gotten pretty good shot at 30 yds can get a pie plate group but better with the SBH.

I have never messed with a 10 mm or a 41 but many folks like them.
 

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The 10mm is not my cup of tea and I trust revolvers more. The 10mm wins the energy battle but looses in the effective range. It has been proven the .357 magnum can kill Grizz, moose, elk, caribou. I'm sure a 10mm can too. The best woods gun is still the one I carry where every I carry it. Meaning nothing less than a 41 mag and nothing more than a 44 mag. Why, because I can handle them and my guns can handle the load. I only change the loading of the cartridge to fit the worse situation I may encounter. Here in Arkansas bears can reach 500 lbs and hogs over 300 are not unheard of. So for me I would feel under gunned with a .357 and with the loadings and range of a 10mm auto. I feel that the .41 magnum is the perfect woods gun where I live. But, I have upped the anti a bit now. I've added a .41 GNR. 1,815 FPS with a Speer 170 JFP or 1,739 FPS with a 215 HCWFNGC. Wozzer! And it only recoils like the 44 mag.
 

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Hmmm ... a woods gun.

1022 mentioned a 45 acp

38D64A61-F223-45A3-A640-CC524271AF05.jpeg

Drm50’s idea of a woods gun was a good 22

CA4DEFCA-9C20-416E-962C-1CAA65E008EA.jpeg

Tomray thought a 45 Colt using a 250 grain bullet might work

150E88FF-67CA-4ED1-8D94-5125AF9C1896.jpeg

But if push came came to shove, I’d probably go with my .357 GP100.

DA9EFEF7-1436-473D-BB05-AEA88CF223E0.jpeg

(And yeah, I’m partial to shoulder holsters)
 

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Hmmm ... a woods gun.

1022 mentioned a 45 acp

View attachment 761273

Drm50’s idea of a woods gun was a good 22

View attachment 761275

Tomray thought a 45 Colt using a 250 grain bullet might work

View attachment 761277

But if push came came to shove, I’d probably go with my .357 GP100.

View attachment 761279

(And yeah, I’m partial to shoulder holsters)

I carry my 20 in a Diamond D shoulder rig and my Redhawk in a Simply Rugged SourDough with Chesty Puller rig.


I much much prefer the shoulder holsters to the on the belt britches remover method.
 

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I haven't read the entire thread, so apologies if this is a repeat of anyone else's thoughts...

I'd say you are in more danger from the two legged vermin than from the four legged ones. Unless you are hunting and prohibited from carrying an autoloader (like in PA), I'd wear my every day carry and two loaded mags. Just like down town.
 

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I had a Ruger Redhawk 44 mag 7.5” for years. I really liked it but always felt the maneuverability to be limited due to weight and length. I just switched to a Glock 10mm. It handles well, can get two shots off faster than 44 mag due to recoil. I was very pleased with my first shooting range trip (2 weeks ago) regarding accuracy right out of the box. I have a black bear hunt in NC this Fall and plan for it to be my back up gun. It would not be my first one to go to for Grizzly but it is rare that I would be in Grizzly country. I plan to use BB hard cast bullets for it.
 

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I have 3 that I use for woods carry.

I used to just carry my CW45 because coyotes and feral dogs were about all I ever saw and a spunky 185 grain load is plenty for them. This was while working on stands, clearing fencelines, etc..

But in the last 5 or so years, it seems a "Bear Bomb" went off around here or I just got good at finding them....the 185 grain load was not so comforting....

Jumping on any reason with both feet to buy, build, modify, upgrade, or whatever I need to do, I ended up with these three.

First it was a 4.62" Ruger SuperBlackhawk. But it was really uncomfortably to shoot and not so easy to control because of the smallish grips. *Bear* in mind, I am shooting stiff 300 grain loads. I had pretty much quit shooting this revolver because it was just not fun to shoot. Then I saw a thread about extended grips by Texas grips, got a pair...what a difference!

Here it is:



Well, before the grip situation was resolved, I figured that since I had several 1911s, one could go through life as a .45 Super if it would feed 255 grain hardcasts. It took a little bit of fitting and tuning, but I ended up with an Utterly reliable Ruger SR1911 in .45 Super. I had considered a .460 Rowland and after working with the Super, I went ahead and got a Clark kit and converted a Kimber Custom II I have. Very little tuning and fitting was required, this thing just up and ran almost from the git-go, needing just a slightly longer link and the extractor tuned, which I just replaced with a Wilson Bullet-proof.

I have used two bullets with these pistols, Missouri Bullet Company's 255 grain "pinbuster", a RNFP, and Missouri Bullet Works 250 grain LFN GC cast in a LBT mold. They have both been fired enough to have no doubts about their reliability. The Super is running the 255s at about 1075 fps, the Rowland is over 1100 fps but not much, recoil is getting to where recovery starts to suffer, otherwise.

Rowland on the top, Super on the bottom.








I am not even close to stopping considering a 10mm. Probably just a matter of time. XDm 5.25 keeps coming to mind....
 

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I can't speak much regarding the power of the .357 Mag other than to say it is a very powerful cartridge.

As to the 10mm, we hear differing opinions about the power of that cartridge. Some say it's no more powerful than the .357 Mag only with a bigger bullet. Some say it's more powerful than the .357 but falls way short of the .41 Mag. Some say it's about equal to the .41 Mag.

I'll leave characterizations of the 10mm to the experts. Instead, I can offer this range data measured using my Kimber and factory made ammunition. My measured results are shown in green. I hope it helps with your decision. It is important to note that my pistol has a 6" barrel.

10mm.-ammo.jpg
 

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Delta Elite for Me

My preference for a Woods Gun.
20190625_065956.jpg
20190625_070026.jpg

I have killed both deer, and good sized hogs,
with the 175 gr Silvertips.
One shot kills out to 40 yds,with no tracking
necessary.
I suspect that 2 legged Varmints
would succumb even more easily.

For plain woods walking, fishing, or if I am carrying a rifle I usually go with this
20170416_131840.jpg
 
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