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Discussion Starter #1
This might be a stupid question so please forgive my ignorance if that's the case.

Can OTC Factory .357 Mag Ammo be used in a 336 .35 Remington?

If so, is there anything to watch out for? Would any certain Ammo work good for deer if you limit your range to 100 yard's?

I know you can use .38 ammo in a Marlin 1894c .357 Magnum
 

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NNNNNOOOOOOOO!!!!!!! :eek: The case will blow wide open and release gas in the chamber and may come back into your face or worse! Look at the difference in the case, and you will see why. DP
 

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marksman336 said:
This might be a stupid question so please forgive my ignorance if that's the case.

Can OTC Factory .357 Mag Ammo be used in a 336 .35 Remington? -NO!

If so, is there anything to watch out for? Would any certain Ammo work good for deer if you limit your range to 100 yard's?

I know you can use .38 ammo in a Marlin 1894c .357 Magnum
 

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Definitely a NO NO! The rifles (357 Mag and .35 Remington) are chambered differently, thus the difference in casing sizes and shapes.

However, if you reload you can buy and use the .357 "bullets" (not the whole .357 ammo) in a 35 Rem case with the proper powder load to get a lighter source of ammo for your .35 Rem.

The .38 special works in the .357 Mag rifle or revolver because the are the same casing, except for length (in both types the casings are straight walled with no shoulder angles or other differences). Both rounds fit to the dimensions of the chamber of the rifle so that no excessive pressures build up; and no exploding gases dangerously escape the chamber. Caution you can not use the higher .357 loads in a .38 special casing either.

CJ
 

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Can't do it! Just look at the two cases and it should become obvious, even though the diameter is the same at the case rim the .35 Rem is bottle-necked to a larger diameter. The chamber is much longer which would leave way too much space left over - much too dangerous as has been said earlier.
 

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Not a stupid question at all.

35 Remington, second from right, .357 mag, leftmost:



35 Remington:
Rim diameter: .460 in
Base diameter: .458 in
bottlenecked rimless case

.357 Magnum:
Rim diameter: .440 in
Base diameter: .379 in
straightwalled rimmed case

A cartridge case is not designed to contain the pressures of ignition. It is made from thin and relatively soft metal (brass). The strong and thick-walled steel chamber contains the pressure, the cartridge case just acts as a gasket for the most part. Looking the above numbers you can clearly see that a .35 Remington case could never fit in a .357 chamber, and vice versa would be dangerous since the .357 Magnum base diameter is extremely undersized for a .35 Remington chamber. Often it is also the case that pistol calibers run higher pressures than rifles, as well, which is a further danger. For instance, the .357 Magnum's SAAMI maximum pressure is 35,000psi, while the .35 Remington's SAAMI maximum pressure is 33,500 psi. Now considering that the .35 Rem chamber is too big to contain that little 357 case, so that it's basically guaranteed to let go, and the pistol cartridge trying to exert that much pressure...you'd have serious problems.

This is all assuming that you'd be able to even get ignition on the cartridge. The .35 Rem is a rimless case, meaning it headspaces on the shoulder, while the 357 is a rimmed cartridge, meaning it headspaces on the rim.

In short just keep ammo that is not an exact 100% match out of your chamber unless you know for a fact that you are dealing with an exception such as shorter/weaker versions of a given revolver chambering such as .38 special/.357 magnum, .44 special/.44magnum, .45 Colt/.454 Casull, etc.

When in doubt only stick to ammo that specifically matches the chamber of your firearm, or ask around to people in the know just as you have, and consult SAAMI specifications. SAAMI has a number of publications on their website that help here, such as their "Unsafe Firearm-Ammunition Combinations" datasheet:

http://www.saami.org/specifications...1-Unsafe_Arms_and_Ammunition_Combinations.pdf

Some of these are counter-intuitive, so it's good to always check. For instance, it is generally not safe to fire 5.56X45 NATO military ammo in a rifle chambered for .223 Rem, but .223 Rem in a rifle chambered for 5.56X45 NATO generally is safe, etc.
 
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I use some of the heavier 357 Mag bullets that I cast in loads for my 336 in 35 Rem. Besides the Ranch Dogs, I have an older Lyman mold it was designed to cast heavy bullet for the 357 MAX cartidges, 214 grains SWC GC.

Jerry
 

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miestro_jerry said:
I use some of the heavier 357 Mag bullets that I cast in loads for my 336 in 35 Rem. Besides the Ranch Dogs, I have an older Lyman mold it was designed to cast heavy bullet for the 357 MAX cartidges, 214 grains SWC GC.
Jerry
Again, this is reloading data for bullets. Not factory loaded cartridges of differing calibers. I'd say it'd be more than a good guess that the O.P. doesn't reload, so try not to confuse him.

The answer is that no, you can't use 357mag cartridges in a 35rem caliber rifle. You're stuck with the slightly pricey and hard to find (depending on area) 35rem cartridges. It *does* make a good caliber to reload and there are more than enough 35rem users in the Reloading forum to help on your way if you decide to go this route.

The 35rem is a solid 100yard gun. You shouldn't have any problem hunting things within that range.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank's EVERYONE for the Lesson.

I'm not sure where I got the idea but I see your point crystal clear. I feel about an inch tall...

When it comes to Gun's maybe there are no stupid question's.

I like to think I have "Right Reason" as they say but will readilty admit I know very little about reloading. I have no interest in it at this point and don't really shoot enough to justify buying the equipment and supplies. I guess buying brand name ammo gives me piece of mind. I know I have a lot to learn about Rifle Ammo, Powder, Bullet's etc.
 

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NEVER feel bad about asking marksman,we all started somewere. Just by asking the question was a step in the right direction.
 

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Don't feel bad at all! Reloading is a very rewarding thing to do, but you have to respect that you are dealing with gunpowder. It's like good tools, knowing how they work makes them safer to use.

The folks here just want you to be safe - not humiliated.
 

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Definately not a dumb question!

As an instructor there aren't any dumb questions, but I've sure had some dumb know-it-alls.

One of my fellow instructors has a spent case collection with various flaws. He has more than one 9mm Luger case that was somehow fired in a .40 S&W, and these are relatively low-pressure rounds.

Nice ballooning of the case body, one is split. I'd imagine it was kinda like a rock from a slingshot for accuracy.

I would think, if it could be fired, a .357 bullet would cork right at the start of the rifling on a .35 Rem, then build pressures to WAY above what the action can handle.

Let's send it to Mythbusters!

Jon
 

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marksman336 said:
Thank's EVERYONE for the Lesson.

I'm not sure where I got the idea but I see your point crystal clear. I feel about an inch tall...

When it comes to Gun's maybe there are no stupid question's.

I like to think I have "Right Reason" as they say but will readilty admit I know very little about reloading. I have no interest in it at this point and don't really shoot enough to justify buying the equipment and supplies. I guess buying brand name ammo gives me piece of mind. I know I have a lot to learn about Rifle Ammo, Powder, Bullet's etc.
Never a dumb question.. it's better to be safe then sorry. Especially with gun powder involved...

As a rule of thumb, always use the caliber/cartridge engraved on the firearm and nothing else ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
All good sound advice.

I think "Common Sense" or as it's called these day's "Uncommon Sense" goes a long way.

Kinda remind's me of something I witnessed year's ago at a shooting Range where the common sense rule wasn't applied.....

Year's ago a friend and I went to the Range to shoot a new T/C Firestorm .50 Caliber Flintlock. Well there was another guy there that we watched for an hour trying to get his old beat up Flint Lock to fire. The Gun wouldn't go off no matter what he did. The trusty "Firestorm" I was using has a great Lock and ALWAY'S fired with good flint and keeping the Frizzen Scratched up using 65 Grain's of BP down the Barrel.

Anyway, my friend went over and tried helping the guy out. Flintlock season was less then a week away. To make a long story short the two put their head's together and my friend decided he would take his lighter and hold it up to the touch hole to see if the Flintlock would go off. :eek: My friend lit the lighter then looked over at me. I told him "don't do it" but he already made his mind.

I don't know what load or how much powder the guy had in the pan but when that Gun went off fire shot out the left side of the gun where the touch hole was about 3 feet and a large cloud of smoke enveloped them both. The next thing I heard was my buddy moaning and trying to walk off the pain and burning from having 2F Black Powder inbedded into his hand's. That trip to the ER was an expensive one.

Learn and live as the saying goes.
 
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