Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
for that large group of 35 Rem aficionados who may not know. I collect Marlin catalogs from 1948 onward, as 1948 was the introductory year for the Model 336; I'm still missing a few 50's era catalogs, but acquired an original 1950 catalog with price list this week. As everyone knows, 1950 was the year Marlin added the 35 Remington chambering to the Model 336 line-up; and that fact is dutifully stated in the catalog. What I didn't know was that Marlin did not catalog the ADL model as being available in 35 Rem, the ADL models only being offered in 30/30 Win and 32 Win Special calibers; nor was the 20" carbine model available in 35 Rem, the 35 Rem caliber only being offered in the 336A and 336SC models. But the item from this catalog that really stood out were the suggested retail prices. The 336SC in 30/30 Win and 32 Win Special listed at $61.45; but the 336SC in 35 Rem listed at $69.95. In the 336A models, the A's chambered in 30/30 Win and 32 Special listed at $72.55; but the same model chambered in 35 Rem listed at $82.55 (for only $4.95 more, $87.50; a guy could have purchased an ADL model in 30/30 and 32 Win Special). Obviously we'd all like to buy a few Marlins at these prices today; but in 1950 $10 was big money to the average guy; so this price difference no doubt kept sales of the Marlin 35 Rem lower than they would have been had that model been priced the same as the other calibers. So that's the skinny on the 1950 model 336A and SC Marlin 35 Rem lever guns; and I guess about the only thing one can draw from these facts is this. If you currently own a 1950 Model 336A or SC in 35 Rem, then you can rest assured that the original proud owner of that gun was so excited to have a 35 Rem lever gun that he was willing to pay a $10 premium for the privilege.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,455 Posts
Thanks for the info Ratchethead. I only have catalogs for the Marlins I own.
It's fun to look through them.


In 1950 a journeyman plumber would have to work 35 hours for $87.50, but today he only has to work about 16 hours for a new 336.
Now, the new guns are not nearly the quality they were back then, but people didn't own a whole gun safe full of guns. Until I was about 18, my Dad only owned three guns. A 12 ga., a .22 rifle, and a 30-40 Krag.
When my Dad bought me my first gun, it was the most he ever paid for a gun, up to that time.
And here it is.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here is another interesting bit of trivia as regards Marlin and 1950. As some of you know, the L.C. Smith Gun Company went into receivership in 1945; and was subsequently purchased out of bankruptcy by the Marlin Firearms Company later that year. In February 1945 the portion of the decrepit L.C. Smith gun works plant, the portion housing all the important heavy milling machines above the canal that (water) powered this equipment, collapsed into the canal. Marlin then decided it would be too expensive to rehab the old building and replace the lost equipment; so the Smith gun works became a foot note in American gun making history when it was permanently closed in 1950 after as many guns as could be assembled from parts on hand were completed; and one of the employees displaced by the plant closure was Master Engraver, Charles E. Jarred of Fulton, NY. I have an original receipt from his estate and dated 1950 where Marlin had paid him $10.00 ($1.50/hour) "for engraving" a project they had subbed out to him after he was laid off. I've also seen a couple of his W-2 forms from the late 40's; one totaled about $2,200 and other about $2,400 in total annual wages. Based on those W-2's, I suspect none of those early Marlin employees made more than just enough to scrape by; but can anyone imagine hiring a master engraver at $1.50/ hour these days?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
Ah, yes the Good Ol' Days' prices. They always look good until you realize just how much money you were not making back then.As Plumber posted, at that time a job paying $2.00 plus an hour was really a good wage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,105 Posts
We tend to own far more guns than the depression/WWII era people. My father owned a 12 gauge and a 22. He did not deer hunt. As for the prices I can agree. I remember making about maybe 2.50 an hour but I also seemed to have more money back then. My new car cost around $2500. Todays cars cost more but look at what they are. Electronic gadgets to tell you if a tire is low on air and they last for over 100,000 miles. Back then 80,000 was pretty good. We also did not have microwave ovens, DVD players and home computers with internet to chat like this. Simpler times with less competition for the dollar. Don't remember credit cards either. You have to also consider that ammo was more expensive relatively speaking. When people from that era bought a box of deer rifle shells they looked at getting 18 deer with them or so. There was a time when shotgun shells were sold by half a box (you got 12 and the store owner kept the single shell) Swatting ducks and ground swatting was considered good practice. When I first started grouse hunting we often used 22's. If they were in a tree shoot the bottom bird first so as not to scare them when the bird fell.
Are we better off today where we can own a stable of deer rifles or shotguns?? I am really starting to look at thinning out the collection as I near retirement. I have developed my favorites and pretty much been there done that in a manner of speaking. Shot deer with everything from a long bow and 22 to a scoped 270. Shot a lot of game birds over pointers and retrievers. Pretty much have been finding that I could hunt about everything with a 12 ga, a 22 and my 300 Savage bolt or my 35 Remington. The bolt gun is a slightly better longer range weapon than the 35 for those rare times I need it.

DEP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
I think one has to remember that the catalog price/MSRP and street price even back then were very different. Also that Marlins were often discounted. Their Model 60 .22 rifle is the most widely made commercial rifle in history because it was sold by every retailer in America at discounted prices. The 336 was the same way. My very first rifle was bought new in 1968 for $69.95 on sale at E.J. Korvettes. It was a Marlin 336 in .35 Rem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
E.J. Korvettes. Now that is a store and name I have not heard or thought about in a long time. Just thought about the big Great Eastern Mills department store in Elmont, NY. A high school buddy often walked there from Franklin Square (where we lived) and looked around at what we could not afford. By Jove!, that was a long time ago....
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,798 Posts
Thus far the least I've paid for any Marlin was $20 I got my 39A for in a tag sale. It needed help but the seller needed money.

That was about 15 years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
"I think one has to remember that the catalog price/MSRP and street price even back then were very different. Also that Marlins were often discounted. Their Model 60 .22 rifle is the most widely made commercial rifle in history because it was sold by every retailer in America at discounted prices. The 336 was the same way. My very first rifle was bought new in 1968 for $69.95 on sale at E.J. Korvettes. It was a Marlin 336 in .35 Rem".

That is certainly true, which is why I noted manufacturers "suggested retail prices". But regardless of how the seller priced his guns over the counter, a gun with a higher suggested manufacturers retail price also carried a higher wholesale price to the dealer; which was the point of my original point, a guy purchasing a 1950 M336 chambered in 35 Rem still paid a premium for the privilege of ownership. As to 1968, I remember that year well; it was the year my wife and I married. Wages were low in those days (I was a sophomore at UGA working part time, and my wife clerked at Belk for $45/week), but on the other hand gas was 3 gallons for $1 (4-5 gallons/$1 during a "gas war" promotion), bread 3 loaves for a buck, hamburger 3lbs for a buck, T-bone steak $.89/pound, a snazzy Impala Super-Sport about $4K; and on and on. Times began to change dramatically under the tenure of America's second worst president ever, Jimmy Carter (Jimmy should be very grateful to Mr. Obama) with incredible inflation (how many here remember 16% mortgage rates, lines for gas blocks long, and interest rates on CD at 15%?); and have never been the same since. Don't be surprised if massive inflation comes back after Obama is out of office; and don't be surprised if those times don't leave folks longing for the good old "Carter Days".​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,699 Posts
Those prices were a week's wages in those days...
Back in 1969, I started playing organized basketball. I "needed" a pair of Converse Chuck Taylors, and they were $10. My mom had a conniption. She was used to getting sneakers two for $5 at Penney's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,306 Posts
Ditto1958, re "sneakers". You mean 'ya nevva' had a pair of olive drab sneakers with the black soles from the local Army-Navy surplus store??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
The 336SC in 30/30 Win and 32 Win Special listed at $61.45; but the 336SC in 35 Rem listed at $69.95. In the 336A models, the A's chambered in 30/30 Win and 32 Special listed at $72.55; but the same model chambered in 35 Rem listed at $82.55
And they say you can't make money from selling guns.

When my father returned from Korea, he got a job as a mechanic in a local garage. I remember he said he was making $35/wk, and was lucky to have a job at all. I now make about $2500/wk, plus commissions. All things considered, they are getting cheaper all the time.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top