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A 358 Win would, but I'd feel undergunned with a 35 Rem for large bear unless you had one loaded very hot in a custom bolt action. In addition, I'd want a backup with something a little heavier. Just my impression.
 

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Doogin311:

I have no doubt that you could humanely and safely take any of the animals mentioned if you keep your rifle's limitations and your limitations in mind. You would certainly need to be able to shoot exactly where you aim, use a good bullet designed for deep penetration, have the ability to get close and possess complete self control to maintain your fire discipline until just the right moment, and be willing to let the shot go if everything did not line up. Reloads with this game in mind would be paramount.

Now with all this being said I need to tell you that I've never taken a moose or brown bear nor have I hunted them. I have taken deer and black bear and for the sake of your question that's like comparing apples and oranges. If I get selected for a moose license in Vermont this year I plan on using my .35 Remington.

The moose in Alaska I believe are the largest on the continent. Much bigger than the moose in Vermont. I've read and heard that brown bear are pretty big and tough and certainly can kill you quickly if things go wrong. Now we know that in the past grizzly and moose have been killed with 30-30s and .35 Remingtons, actually lots of these critters have been taken by different hunters.

I'm sure that there are riflemen on this BB that have experience hunting these large animals and hopefully they will give you some answers based upon experience. I certainly would not want to recommend that someone do something and then have things go wrong so all Im going to say is that it's certainly possible to take these creatures with the .35 Rem, but you need to think this one out.

Me, well I'd feel comfortable hunting these animals with a .35 Rem... but that's me and I really respect the .35. And maybe I'm all wet and if so I fully expect to hear about it here.

Anyways, GOOD SHOOTING and keep us posted. :) Range Finder
 
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Doogin,

With all respect, I do not think a 35 Rem is a good choice for hunting Alaskan bears. I live among them, and I would not consider that caliber.

Could you take a bear with it? Of course. You can kill them with an arrow. I don't recommend it. Has it been done? Certainly. Is it a good idea? It's your call.

I suggest you read all you can about bears, and then decide what the best tool is.

I have a 338 and I quit carrying it because I think it's inadequate for my situation.

Study the bears, then decide on the gun, is the best advice I can give.

Regards,

Grizz
 

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From another forum

excerpt:
I've used Buf Bore ammo quite a lot, including in my .35. Surprisingly, the 220 Speer flat nose does less meat damage at close range, say inside 40 yards, than the factory 200 Core-loct. Seems it's going too fast to expand much, and I've yet to recover one in a pig or deer. Their .45 Colt offering was quite impressive too, and both the 260 grain hp and the 325 grain hard cast were great shooters out of my Marlin 1894 Cowboy comp., and one shot killed two pigs at once! To be fair, the first was a small yearling, that I couldn't see in front of the sow, but the bullet passed through one cleanly and smashed the shoulder and jaw of the sow, who quickly crashed into the brush. As I approached, the piglet gave one last squeal and that enraged the sow enough to rear up on her hind legs and come after me! I'm sure she was working only on andrenaline and motherly instinct, but it was the first time one has tried to take out a piece of my hide, and a follow-up shot really wasn't neccessary as we found the damage from the first shot more than enough, and she would have just expired were she lay if it wasn't for my clumsy crashing through the bush and being a large target.
The BB heavy .35 ammo had twice the recoil of the factory 200's, but the 220 JFN has the same energy and velocity at 100 yards as the 200 Core-loct has at the muzzle. I'm quite sure that it is capable of taking elk at 200 yards, provided you know the exact distance and drop of the bullet plus good shot placement. At 150 yards I believe it is capable of taking most critters in North America, and if a buffalo or grizzly can be killed with a large caliber black powder percussion rifle, then it isn't a great leap to trust a hot loaded .35 to do the same. PS-Just because I believe it's possible, doesn't mean it's common or easy. I'm just saying that if it is within each shooters capability, practice and common sense, it's possible.
Just food for thought.
 

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And having posted the above - I would totally agree with Grizz's suggestion of study the game and the habitat, and make your own informed decision.

I own a .35 Rem 336 RC - love it, and I am very impressed by what can be done by handloaders and specialty ammo companys, but I would think at least twice about it for perturbed, big bear "quick stoppers".

Know your capabilities and your ammunitions performance.
 

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I killed two moose and a brwn bear in AK with a 70#bow my guide carried a backup rifle in 375 H&H each time. I had inquired before the first trip about backups and he told me,"all the stuff you read is blown way out of proportion..." . my Brownie was killed at 27 yds with one xx75 thru both lungs he ran off about 150 yds and laid down and died.
I'm certain with 250 solid casts you could pop a brown bear under 100 yds. As for moose I've seen them killed with 6mm at 70 yds shot right behind the shoulder. He jumped about 4' ahead and stood there for 10 seconds then started to walk away for 10 ' and dropped deader than hell.
 
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"and if a buffalo or grizzly can be killed with a large caliber black powder percussion rifle, then it isn't a great leap to trust a hot loaded .35 to do the same"

There is no way that a 35 rem with a 220 or 200gr bullet is comparable to a large caliber black powder load. The buffalo gunners did not shoot 35 cal and they did not use anything as light as 200grs. There is a whole world of difference there.

Over on Leverguns there is an extensive discussion about the 30-30 and bears, it makes for good reading.

As the original topic question is "do you think the 35 rem will do enough...", I have to repeat myself again: maybe.

Like Ridge Runner says, you can kill them with an arrow. BUT he also said there was a guy next to him with a 375 H&H. That's not the same as being YOUR OWN BACKUP.

One more thing, for every bear tale you hear about how easy they died, I can tell you another about how hard they are to kill, and what massive injuries they can sustain before you're safe. They eat people you know.

Best,

Grizz

PS: I am not knocking 35 Rem, it's my TX hog gun, it's just too lite for my needs in Alaska.

:)
 

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Pa Ridge Runner said:
I killed two moose and a brwn bear in AK with a 70#bow my guide carried a backup rifle in 375 H&H each time.
In "my opinion" if you hunt brown bear with a 35 Rem. you might want to have your same guide with his same 375 H&H with you just in case. I know back in the early 1900's the 30-30 Win. and the 35 Rem. were use for all kinds of game including "big bear's". Just remember one thing, at one time if you wanted to go from New York to California you had to ride a horse. Times have changed you don't have to ride a horse from N.Y. to Cali anymore, and there a lot better cartridges out there for brown bear hunt now, I'd get one and use it. Again just "my opinion".
 

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NY Hunter: don't forget that the 250-3000 was considered a good gun for POLAR BEAR! Do you know what the 250-3000 is in reality??? a .257 Roberts ( 25 cal. bullet going 3000FPS) also the 300 Savage was thought to be the best all around caliber for AK at one time.
Now I may be old but isn't a 1200# moose or a 9' coastal Brn bear still the same animal today?

GRIZZ: you brought up BP/ buffalo did you overlook the meager 44-40 or the 38-55? in BP they didn't even have the snot they do today and accounted for train loads of 'buff. Not to mention the simple .50 flintlock.
I hunt as much in AK (Chugach Mtns) asI do in Pa. I lived in Palmer,Anchorage, Sterling, Coopers Landing, and Soldotna most of my working years and go "home" every September to hunt. Ususally with a bow and NO back up. Nowadays when I do resort to gun hunting I carry either a 45 colt Ruger Blk Hwk or a 1895SS 45-70. Pa. Ridge Runner
 
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Hi Ridge Runner,

You're right, I didn't have 44-40 or 38-55 in mind, I was thinking of the plains professional hunters, who, I don't believe, were using the lighter guns. But, IMO, both of those are superior to the 35 rem in everything but range.

You are correct of course, there were far more shooters around using the lighter class cartridges. Basically you use what you have when you get an opportunity.

In regards to the original question, I thought it reflected a lack of actual experience among those animals. Your experience with a bow makes a 35 rem seem like a howitzer. But if someone has never been there and done that, and needs to ask, then I don't recommend a 35 rem.

I posted somewhere else that just because something is possible, that does not make it probable. So, just because someone did kill a brown bear with a 22, that does not make it likely that I would be able to get the same results. And it would not be reasonable for me to try it.

Also, the 35 rem leaves something to be desired, same as your bow, if brer bear or brer moose becomes the hunter, and you are suddenly the prey. Then the idea that the possible does not predict the outcome becomes apparent.

Kudos on the bow hunting by the way, I never got good enough with mine to hunt with it, and the bear scat diverted my attention toward something more substantial.

I have taken deer with rifles from 25-20 thru 338, and got about half of them with a 44 mag hand gun with hard cast handloads.

Best,

Grizz
 

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.35 rem enough for brownie?

I have not yet had the chance to hunt these great beasts.I have studied the idea extensively.I have listened to those who have .I have studied the guides,the bears and the terrain they live in.I think the bullet could kill one but what if it didn't? would you be willing to pick up your testicles and go into the brush and try again against a homocidal maniac that might be 8-9 feet talland now hopped up on adrenilin and anger?[who also can sneak up like a ghost] give me 5 hot loaded 45-70's witha good solid bullet and i'd feel better, but I can only theorize I have'nt yet seen THAT elephant ! shootrj 2003
 

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Doogin.My thoughts for you are to look for a pump bolt or lever gun thats accurate and fast with a good heavy pay load.As good as the 35 rem is I think you have better choices out there.choose wisely.Get a 35 for deer pigs black bear and none alaskin moose.Just my 2 cents.Hawkin50.
 

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Bullet placement is the thing . The Northern Natives up here in Canada have killed deer with the 25/20 and 32/20. But they knew the cartridge and knew where to place the shot.
On the farm I learned as a young lad to dispatch a horse with a .22, then again I have taken chest shots on a jack rabbit with 00 buck shot and mr. bunnie was still going until the second shot .
We need to think about the constuction of a bullet
My friend shot a big cow moose at 70 yards with a 30/30 and it took four shots to put it down. I do not think that he had a hard enough bullet to get deep enough into the chest.
So it does for the 35 Remington . If you use a soft bullet like the remington which are great for deer ,it is going to open up quick and not penetrate in a toughter animal. you had better use a Hornady that has a thicker Jacket and will penetrate or pass through. Barnes probably a good one too if you hot rod the load.
Your limited in what you put in a lever, unless your willing to file the point carfully to make it flat, or limit your self to two shots. Then again if two shots are placed in a animal it should go down. Another two, after you missed the first two, is not going to help much either. I have only killed an animal once with a third shot, only because there was more than one deer.
If I could go West to hunt one of those huge bears or north Western Moose , I think I would first be looking for a used 338 or 375 Bolt action rifle and learn to shoot it.
 

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It can be done, but should it be tried? Take enough gun to make sure. Do you want to walk into the brush, where you can only see 5 to 10 yards, looking for a BIG, ANGRY wounded bear with a 35 Marlin?
 

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If you can afford a trip to Alaska to kill things it is the perfect opportunity to add another Marlin to the arsenal (another excuse for the wife). There are plenty of big bore options that are more suited to shooting bear and dropping it quickly. But if I did not have the good fortune to have one of these in hand down here in the lower 48 I would feel quite well armed with a .35 remington.
 

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Don't know whether this helps or not.

An old friend of mine lived in Alaska from about 1932 to 1942.
He had some form of Game Warden job there in those days at least for some of those years.
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Only rifle he had up there was the only rifle he ever owned, except for .22 lr.'s

He killed and usually ate everything from Grizzly and Moose to Caribou. I do not know about the big coastel browns, I think he might have mentioned it if he had.

He came back to Wisconsin from a successful Wyoming Elk and Antelope hunt in the mid-'60's. I asked him what he used for the Antelope, because all the magazines said you needed a high speed, flat shooting rifle, a scoped .270 at least.

Thats when he went to his closet and brought out his old iron sighted Marlin and said "This one, it's the only big game rifle I've ever owned."

When I asked him how he got an Antelope with a short range rifle like a .35 remington, he said;

"Same way you get anything else, you figure out where they feed, and where they water, then you sit down and when one you like comes along you shoot him!"

Hmmm, made sense to me then, and it still does.

Now lets put that in perspective.

He was a true outdoorsman, an accomplished wildlife artist, and a first rate taxidermist. He had a daily newspaper column on hunting and fishing, and a weekly one hour radio show on the same topics.

He, his wife, and their 3 children basically lived on what he caught, trapped, or shot even in his late 60's. And he was very well off financially by then.

For him, the .35 was all he ever needed!

But he knew the animals, their habits, their behaviour and most importantly he knew their anatomy.

I doubt if he ever shot anything over 100 yards in his life, 50 or 60 was the norm.

He reloaded for economy, not for power, factory equivqlent only.

He was a fine man and those of us priveledged to know him, miss him.

His "secret" was bullet placement and the ability to get close enough to gurantee the round went exactly where he wanted it to, and knowing precisely where he wanted it to go.

I'm sure he doesn't mind my sharing his "secret" with others.

He always was generous that way!

Regards to all,
Gary
 
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