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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read on another thread that Marlin only produced 1000 336's in .35Rem last year. Could this be the Swan Song of one of the greatest whitetail cartridges ever produced?

I can say this with the up most confidence; With the exception of bowhunting and muzzleloading, I will never hunt whitetails with any caliber other than the .35Rem. I refuse to break a 23 year tradition that I started back in 1980.

I know, this isn't the first time that the demise of this caliber has been rumored. I wish I had a dime for everytime that someone told me that I need to find a more modern/popular caliber to hunt with, because the .35Rem is on it's "death bed". That is usually when I tell them to hush up and help me drag this deer back to camp!LOL.....Well, as long as my heart is beating the .35 will live on. Call me stubborn, besides I've been called worst. :wink:

I have considered getting started in handloading for a few years now. I came to the conclusion a short time ago that if there comes a day that I can't go to the local gun shop and buy factory ammo for my .35Rem, then that will be the day I start reloading. Until then, I really have no need to do so.

I know that T/C offers their single shot "pistol" in .35Rem, but I suspect that most of the T/C shooters are handloaders. Therefore, if Marlin does discontinue the .35Rem in their 336, how long will it be before the factory ammunition is discontinued?
 

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Lever:

I think it will probably be quite awhile before the ammunition is totally discontinued if all new production is dropped. I'm sure you can name lots of calibers that are orphans, like 30-40 Krag, 300 Savage, 250 Savage, etc. etc.

It will just get harder and harder to find. If it's any consolation, there seem to be quite a few that own barrels in .35 Remington for the Contender, and I am one. Friend Dave tells me of all the "specialty" pistol bullets that used to be offered by Hornady in 7mm, 30 and 35 calibers (the "SSP's") intended for single shot handguns, only the .35 180 SSP survives. When he somewhat apprehensively asked if Hornady would discontinue that one too, the representative said, "Oh no. That one is a very good seller. We make a half million of those per year."

About the 7mm 120 SSP-it is now listed as as a standard rifle bullet, even though the construction is the same as before with the interlock ring. No mention is made in their catalog about suitability for pistols, but the rep proved it was identical to before. Sent Dave a sample with a sectioned jacket to show it is still a game bullet at pistol speeds. The interlock feature was there. They list it as "varmint" for 7mm rifles, I believe.

I found that .35 ammunition is pretty hard to get locally. I didn't see all three brands sitting on the same shelf together, ever, until a Scheel's opened up here in Lincoln. I bought out what they had for testing purposes and they didn't get around to replacing it until two months had passed.

I am used to it though, and I get by. Been a handloader since day 1.

But if you are considering the purchase of another new rifle, now might be the time.
 

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I would think that the cartridge will continue to be produced for awhile - look at the .32 WS. So I get a double whammy - I have one of each!

I am finding that less shops carry the .32 WS in stock, some of the bigger places do, and though I like to support the local small guy, if I need, I go where it is.

I keep looking and will find a decent used single stage press, and then start trying my hand at the .32 WS. It will be fun once I get to it.
 

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Missing some information. How many did Marlin make in 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002. With that information we could see a trend. From your post we know that Marlin maded 1000 in 2003. If they have been averaging 1000 for say the last ten years then I would say that the 35 Remington is safe. Parley
 

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Even if production of Marlins 35 stopped the ammo will be available for a long time to come. Theres just too many floating around to stop ammo production and also more in handgun configuration. I wouldnt hand load for it right now as not too much to be gained in that cal. by handloading either $$$ wise or accuracy wise. I can still buy ammo for my .375 win. and they havent made them since the 70s....Oh and for u guys that cant get ammo locally you can always get it thru the mail from places like http://www.midwayusa.com....
 

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Parley:

Good point. I'm not too well connected, so I don't have that information. Maybe an internet search would yield something.

This would be a first for me-hoping that Marlin has made only 1,000 .35 Remingtons per year for the last 10 years!

In articles on the .35 (very infrequent) I have read, the writers have termed the .35 as "slipping fast" (Layne Simpson).

This means the .30-30 outsells the .35 by about 75 to one. It does not deserve to, which means two things:

1) The .35 ain't on the shelf of most gun stores and commercial retailers
2) There's no demand because it isn't available and no one has heard of it.

I bought one of mine many years ago by responding to a sale at KMart in Columbus, Nebraska. The ad said ".30-30 or .35 Remington calibers" but when I went to the store, the clerk said they didn't have one in stock and had never ordered one, despite the ad. I grabbed their large ordering book, pointed out that the ad and the distributor offered it in .35, and insisted on their ordering one for me at the sale price.

They did. And it's something different from the usual .30-30, which was the whole point.

Choice is good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree that Parley made a good point. I have also wondered what the production numbers has been in the years past.

I find the ratio of sells compared to the 30/30 very interesting, as I have wondered about that as well. I have never had trouble finding factory ammo for my .35. But here in the southeast, I believe, it is a much more common caliber than in other parts of the country.

LET ME TELL YA"LL SOMETHING!

I am one to believe that nothing in this world happens by accident. With that said, I attended a wedding this afternoon. My good friend got married today and I was one of the groomsman. He introduced me to his neighbor whom I have never met formally. It just so happens he is a handloader, GO FIGURE. I bet you all could guess one of his favorite calibers is that he reloads. YEP, .35REM.

We talked through most of the reception about our passion for the .35 and other calibers of old. I have been invited down to see first hand exactly what is all involved. He also told me that him and I could work up some loads for my 336. He loves the 180 grain for the .35 that I have heard all of ya'll speak so highly of here, and wants me to give them a try out of my 336. But he did tell me that we need to start out slow then work our way up using my Marlin 336 as the "test bed".

Needless to say I'm excited for having this opportunity. I still find it remarkable at times how we all are so unselfishly willing to help one another in these kind of matters. In this day and time, it really is a rare thing.
 

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Part of the problem is that you never hear anything about the 35 Rem. None of the gun rags want to write about "old" news. Most are whores to the "supermags" too many people buy their rifle because of what they read in some gun or hunting rag. Dont get me wrong, I like new stuff, just because it is new or different, but it would still be good to read often about the great American cartridges and how good they still are. Wont happen though.
 

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Given the number of 35's in use, I doubt the 35 will disappear anytime soon, even if they stop chambering guns for it. There are a lot of handloaders who roll their own 35's, and as long as there's a demand for the brass, Remington will keep making it.
I just got my 35 dies this week, and have already started working up loads, using the Speer 180 grain "Hot-Cor" bullet. I loaded this slug in 357 maximum many years ago, and have always had good results with it. Powders used will be BLC-2 and Varget, and I have high hopes.
The 35 Rem may not be the newest, biggest or fastest, but there are a lot of people who rely on it to get the job done, and for deer, bear, and wild pigs, there are few calibers better suited to woods hunting. Long live the 35!
PJ
 
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papajohn said:
Given the number of 35's in use, I doubt the 35 will disappear anytime soon, even if they stop chambering guns for it. There are a lot of handloaders who roll their own 35's, and as long as there's a demand for the brass, Remington will keep making it.
I just got my 35 dies this week, and have already started working up loads, using the Speer 180 grain "Hot-Cor" bullet. I loaded this slug in 357 maximum many years ago, and have always had good results with it. Powders used will be BLC-2 and Varget, and I have high hopes.
The 35 Rem may not be the newest, biggest or fastest, but there are a lot of people who rely on it to get the job done, and for deer, bear, and wild pigs, there are few calibers better suited to woods hunting. Long live the 35!
PJ
My sentiments exactly. :D
 

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I think if you lokk into the original post on this thread you will find that Marlin produced just 1000 336D for Davidson's as a special run.
 

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Leverpuller, D

Did you tell your buddy how you got your first .35? I don't blame you if you didn't, if you just met him I'm sure you didn't want to see him cry.

Everyone else,

I don't want to beat a dead horse, but if you haven't heard the way Leverpuller got his first 336 you should get him to print it sometime. It is a tear jerker.

My opinion:

I have been expecting the demise of the .35 for a while now. It dosen't fly off the shelves like the 30-30 does and that's what Marlin (or anyone else) needs from their products, marketablity. It would not pay them to build it up through PR, that would be transfusing from one arm to the other spilling 90% in between. If it happens, it happens. I suppose that's why I'm trying to buy as many original Marlin .35's as I can, -- but then I really don't need a reason.

To most it is an old, outdated, unexciting, underpowered, has been round. To me, and apparently most of us here, it's a compact, trusted, well adapted, surgical brush insturment with power from adequate to crushing with only moderate recoil. So long as it is used the way it was intended it is unbeatable.

It is my opinion that a good percentage of the supermag fans are hunting with them in the brush. If so, they are probably as miserable as I was in my teenage years when I hunted with a 7mm Mag in the woods of North Alabama. Their choice, but if they hunted with my 336 for a day they would be hooked. But then they would have to withstand some pretty heavy scoffing by their hunting buddies who carry the mags. Peer pressure, guess it never dies.
 

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Hello Riflemen: I see many of you feel much as I do about the new nuclear driven super ultra plasma magnums that are pushed by the manufactures and rifle mags. these days. To those that need them they are wonderful I suppose but at least for me there is a rare feeling of pleasure that comes with a time tested effective rifle and cartridge. I do not own a 35 Rem. but wish I did and enjoy the fact that many still use them. We do have a couple marlin 30-30's in the family but would quickly trade one for a 35 Rem..
Leverpuller, it usually takes a long time for ammunition to be discontinued when a rifle caliber is dropped but this might be a great excuse for you to get aquainted with handloading. If you are not filled to the gills with hobbies reloading your own ammo is just about the limit of interesting hobbies. Whether you can actually save money or improve on the factory ammunition there is so much to be gained from the time in the reloading room. You can take it as far as you want to even building your own bullets and/or molds. It is a bit spendy getting started but a very economical hobby after the initial buy in. In fact, if you are going to shoot anyway, handloading may be one of the cheapest hobbies around.
My hat's off to you for your 20+ years of deer hunting with the same caliber rifle and I bet the deer you hunt are worse off because of it. :wink: Good luck and I hope I will be able to one day know exactly why you enjoy the 35. Bestlever
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the kind words, Sidespin. That was a darn good description of the .35Rem. "Surgical brush insturment": I'll have to use that phrase in the future. :wink

Thanks for everybody's input.
 

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Well Well 35 rem lovers. I think you have to own one to really get to like the gun , then reloading brings out the best.
Ammo on the self is getting rare where I live and thus with Ammo sales soft who wants to invest in the rifle .
Well I bought a 336/35 RC last year built in '54 and just love the cartridge.
If Marlin drops the 35 rem, it will be sad and if you remember I tried to spark some interst on the Marlin forum.
To all reloaders start buying some brass. used Brass here in Canada is like a buck toothed chicken ,and new brass cost the bucks.
I am putting what brass I can, away.
Happy
 

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Thanks to Leverpuller i am a proud owner of the 35 rem. If remington would introduce a rifle in 35 rem i think that might incourage production of different 35's. we'll see, o well i am always going to have a 35, im taking mine to montana.

I just went to Remingtons web site and it seems they are still producing the 150 gr bullets. where did you see that they were not.
 

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Cool! Is this a new rifle Hogbuster?

Leverpuller has a way of bringing a person over to his way of thinking, not that you had to be convinced.

Whatever the reason the .35 is a great round. Lots of wide open territory in Montana, what you gonna hunt with it up there?

SS
 

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It is a fairly new gun, it was the first gun that i bought when i turned 18, which i still am, im going to college in montana and i will hunt deer and elk if i get a tag, im also considering bear, im bringing my 35 and my 270, that should cover all bases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Sidespin said:
Leverpuller has a way of bringing a person over to his way of thinking, not that you had to be convinced.


SS
My wife would most certainly disagree with that statement. :roll: :D

I will take some credit in helping Hogbuster in his decision on a good "mountain" gun for these Southeastern Whitetails. But he didn't take much convincing, I assure you. He got a nice 8 pointer in Georgia this past season.

In fact, 'Buster and I will hit the woods this coming Saturday morning. Opening day of turkey season. I will try and call one of these Blue Ridge Gobblers so he can christen his new Mossberg 835 3 1/3" 12 ga. (just like the one I got) Come to think of it, his gun safe is starting to look like mine. :D

HOGbuster,

Awww Grasshopper, you have come a long way, but still much is to be learned! :p :p :p
 

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our safes will look even closer when you have that 22-250. I hope we bring um down. Cya at 0600. BEN
 
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