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I would like to convert a newer marlin .35 rem to 358 win any advice. I have heard of it being done and think I would like to try it. I would be most interested in hearing from a person who has done this conversion.
 

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I'm sure it can be done but why not convert it to .356 WIN? Marlin once chambered the 336 in that cartridge and you wouldn't have to deal with the rimless case and possible extraction problems.
 

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http://www.gunweek.com/2003/feature0301.html
Look at this one it has a lot of info on the conversion.The only reason i wouldn`t do it is the presure is too hi for the .358 win and i just have a hard time putting my eye behind that bolt.now i know the .356 runs at the same presure but i don`t know if its on the same action or what.needs more looking in to
Riflemen10x
 

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I read the article on .35 to .358 and am more enthusiastic about it now. It said the gunsmith didnt take the barrel off. Did he use a pull through reamer or how did he manage that??
 
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I did a finish chamber ream on a 35 Whelen with the barrel still on the 98K action. What I did was to use a 3/8 ratchet extension and turn it around from normal then attached the tap handle to the 3/8 male end and went at it. The reamer was a PTG self aligning style so it was very simple.
 

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I read the article listed and I have a few questions and a few comments based on the fact that the author of the article left out some very essential information that might make the conversion quite a bit less than he said it was. If anyone can throw some light on this, please jump in.

First, the longer case means many .35 bullets will not work as long as they are crimped in the crimping groove, in 200 grain weights and above. Unless the ejection port was modified (didn't see it) and maybe the feeding mechanism as well, the .358 loaded to standard length won't work. In the 336 action around 2.55-2.57" is maximum. The .358 conversion exceeds this with almost anything but the 220 and 180 Speer bullets. These have the shortest nose length above the cannelure of the .35 bullets I have on hand, measuring .525." Add this to the 2.005" to .2015" .308 case and it works, but just barely. On 200 grain bullets, it really isn't possible to make another cannelure ahead of the existing one, because the curve of the ogive has already commenced. The Hornady 200 RN measures .645" ahead of the cannelure, the Remington 200 RN .595" Both will not work, as total length exceeds 2.6."

I think the 250's have no chance, because there is even more bullet ahead of the cannelure with those than the 200's. Being limited to the 180 and 220 Speer bullets for big game is not so bad, because they would be fine in the .358, but it's something you might need to know.

See the bullet loaded in the .358, pictured next to the .35 Remington cartridge for comparison? That looks very, very much like the 147 grain 9mm bullet he mentions in the text that he got to fly at 2900 fps. Notice it has no cannelure visible, or if there is one, he didn't use it. This bullet is intended for around 1100 fps velocities. It is not a big game bullet, and unless it hit anything but ribs on a full broadside shot I would be willing to bet it's not much of a deer bullet either. That thing would blow up like a plastic tipped .22 varmint bullet, and very likely would be even more fragile than that. Even the .22 plastic tips don't expand at 1100 fps, and that 9mm hollowpoint will. I'd use it for varmints only, or nothing bigger than about 80 lbs, no matter what kind of critter.

Microgroove rifling hates undersized bullets, either cast or jacketed, usually because rifled diameter of the barrel runs .358" plus in many rifles in .35 Remington. It will shoot .357" pistol bullets pretty well if they have a long bearing surface. 9mm bullets go .355." That's almost a rattle fit in some guns. Stick with pistol bullets of .357" for varmints. They also have a cannelure to crimp in. Most 9mm bullets don't.

Pressures also have my attention. The .358 pressures may run higher than the .356 was loaded to. Yes, I know, both say 52,000 CUP, but CUP is arbitrary and varies by cartridge. I suspect 52,000 CUP means 60-62,000 psi for the .358 and about 46-50,000 psi for the .356. Ever see transducer figures in psi for the .375, .307 and .356? I haven't. I suspect we never will. I don't think anyone wants you to know just what the pressures in cartridges like the .375, .307 and .356 were, either in factory loads or handloads. We're dealing with a lawsuit happy society, and I believe factories and handloading manuals limit pressures in traditional lever actions to more modest levels than in bolt actions. No safety margin exists due to very poor gas venting from any type of primer leak or case failure. Not good. The lower pressures are there for a good reason, in my opinion. High pressures also cause extraction issues, poor case life and early casehead separations in lever guns of this type.

Reader's Digest version? Due to necessary shorter overall length, deeper bullet seating, springy rear lockup, poor gas handling and poor extraction characteristics, a lot of loads listed for the .358 may NOT be safe in the conversion. My opinion.
But it's a free country, and your eyeballs are your own to destroy.

I learned, from another forum, that Marlin made less than 1000 .35 Remington 336's last year. I am afraid they will drop it, and no matter what you think about it as a cartridge, it is certainly at least the equal of the .30-30 and a very viable alternative for those of you that just want to be different. It deserves to stick around. If the factory ballistics sound unimpressive, shoot the 200's at 2200, the 180's at 2400 and the 220 Speer at 2120 or so. You will still be fine, pressures will still be low, and you will have around 2200-2300 ft/lbs. That's plenty for most hunting you will do.

Loaded safely and to pressures I would be comfortable with, the .358 conversion would offer some performance gain over the regular .35 Remington, but if you are getting more than .356 ballistics I would suggest you are pushing the limits of safety too far. For myself, if I needed more punch than the .35 Remington, I would drag out the .45-70 and know for a fact that I had a noticeable increase in power.
 
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Wish Marlin would pump up the .35 Remington.

Sad to hear from 35 Remington that only about 1000 were made last year. On the MT forum I often tried to build up interest on Marlin's part to use .35 Remington barrels on other versions of the 336.
Chamber the stainless steel, camo rifles etc in .35 Remington would boost the number sold and prolong the life of a great cartridge now nearing 100 years of age.
Shoot safe. Long live the .35 Remington.
 
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Rechambering a 35 rem bbl

Did it, but used a 30-30 and a spare 35 rem. bbl I had. fitted the barrel and ran a 358 reamer in far enough to essentially make it a 356 win. Couldn't get the rounds in the loading gate(larger dia). and max loads (slight lever stick) were only around starting loads for the 356, barely over 35 rem. levels. Gonna put a 24" 30-30 bbl. on the 30-30 action,and turn down a 35 cal douglas bbl I had and fit it to a 444 marlin action and chamber for the 356. I would leave your 35 rem. alone if I were you. 8)
 

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I've done it as a matter of fact I have one on the bench right now I should be working on.
unless your real sure you need that 358 I would just stay with the 35 Rem and 200-250 gr bullets for <200 yd work
I have built a couple 24" SS 35 Rems, a clone to the CB336 30-30 & 38-55, with the extra barrel lenght and proper load it makes a superb 250 yd gun for any game in NA.
I once killed a nice brown bear with a 35 Rem and 250 gr bullets. Wak
 
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358

35remington said:
I read the article listed and I have a few questions and a few comments based on the fact that the author of the article left out some very essential information that might make the conversion quite a bit less than he said it was. If anyone can throw some light on this, please jump in.

First, the longer case means many .35 bullets will not work as long as they are crimped in the crimping groove, in 200 grain weights and above. Unless the ejection port was modified (didn't see it) and maybe the feeding mechanism as well, the .358 loaded to standard length won't work. In the 336 action around 2.55-2.57" is maximum. The .358 conversion exceeds this with almost anything but the 220 and 180 Speer bullets. These have the shortest nose length above the cannelure of the .35 bullets I have on hand, measuring .525." Add this to the 2.005" to .2015" .308 case and it works, but just barely. On 200 grain bullets, it really isn't possible to make another cannelure ahead of the existing one, because the curve of the ogive has already commenced. The Hornady 200 RN measures .645" ahead of the cannelure, the Remington 200 RN .595" Both will not work, as total length exceeds 2.6."

I think the 250's have no chance, because there is even more bullet ahead of the cannelure with those than the 200's. Being limited to the 180 and 220 Speer bullets for big game is not so bad, because they would be fine in the .358, but it's something you might need to know.

See the bullet loaded in the .358, pictured next to the .35 Remington cartridge for comparison? That looks very, very much like the 147 grain 9mm bullet he mentions in the text that he got to fly at 2900 fps. Notice it has no cannelure visible, or if there is one, he didn't use it. This bullet is intended for around 1100 fps velocities. It is not a big game bullet, and unless it hit anything but ribs on a full broadside shot I would be willing to bet it's not much of a deer bullet either. That thing would blow up like a plastic tipped .22 varmint bullet, and very likely would be even more fragile than that. Even the .22 plastic tips don't expand at 1100 fps, and that 9mm hollowpoint will. I'd use it for varmints only, or nothing bigger than about 80 lbs, no matter what kind of critter.

Microgroove rifling hates undersized bullets, either cast or jacketed, usually because rifled diameter of the barrel runs .358" plus in many rifles in .35 Remington. It will shoot .357" pistol bullets pretty well if they have a long bearing surface. 9mm bullets go .355." That's almost a rattle fit in some guns. Stick with pistol bullets of .357" for varmints. They also have a cannelure to crimp in. Most 9mm bullets don't.

Pressures also have my attention. The .358 pressures may run higher than the .356 was loaded to. Yes, I know, both say 52,000 CUP, but CUP is arbitrary and varies by cartridge. I suspect 52,000 CUP means 60-62,000 psi for the .358 and about 46-50,000 psi for the .356. Ever see transducer figures in psi for the .375, .307 and .356? I haven't. I suspect we never will. I don't think anyone wants you to know just what the pressures in cartridges like the .375, .307 and .356 were, either in factory loads or handloads. We're dealing with a lawsuit happy society, and I believe factories and handloading manuals limit pressures in traditional lever actions to more modest levels than in bolt actions. No safety margin exists due to very poor gas venting from any type of primer leak or case failure. Not good. The lower pressures are there for a good reason, in my opinion. High pressures also cause extraction issues, poor case life and early casehead separations in lever guns of this type.

Reader's Digest version? Due to necessary shorter overall length, deeper bullet seating, springy rear lockup, poor gas handling and poor extraction characteristics, a lot of loads listed for the .358 may NOT be safe in the conversion. My opinion.
But it's a free country, and your eyeballs are your own to destroy.

I learned, from another forum, that Marlin made less than 1000 .35 Remington 336's last year. I am afraid they will drop it, and no matter what you think about it as a cartridge, it is certainly at least the equal of the .30-30 and a very viable alternative for those of you that just want to be different. It deserves to stick around. If the factory ballistics sound unimpressive, shoot the 200's at 2200, the 180's at 2400 and the 220 Speer at 2120 or so. You will still be fine, pressures will still be low, and you will have around 2200-2300 ft/lbs. That's plenty for most hunting you will do.

Loaded safely and to pressures I would be comfortable with, the .358 conversion would offer some performance gain over the regular .35 Remington, but if you are getting more than .356 ballistics I would suggest you are pushing the limits of safety too far. For myself, if I needed more punch than the .35 Remington, I would drag out the .45-70 and know for a fact that I had a noticeable increase in power.
Great response .
I think you covered all of the base's
I think if there were enough people that wanted a . 356 Marlin some one like Davidson would get Marlin to make some up again.
I read on all the forums that every one wants a 356/358 but Marlin insists they will never sell , since they could hardly justify making them when the ER was offered.

I maintain if the rifle was marketed properly it would sell.
Browning took up the BLR in 358W but I do not see them marketing the rifle too much.Read WWW.gunblast.combrowning-blr358.htm.

Much has been written up about the the virtues of the 356W and it never got much press, since it is not the new WSM 300 yr shooter suitable for the open plains.

How ever , If one could gather up all the Marlin shooters who would want a 356, I am sure that Davidson would show some interst in a thousand or so requests.

Marlin 's Editor on the Marlin Talk, E-mailed me about the number of Marlin 336/35 sold last year , as I was trying to get a 35 CB on the drawing board. With a request of 300 people I could not get Marlin to look at the idea and either would Davidsons.
The numbers are out there that would buy a new 356 Marlin, all every one needs to do is go and get together . Some one I am sure could go it. It is not going to be this ol' Marlin Shooter from Canada. It needs to be a American east coast sportman.
After a year and no serious reponse other than about 300 people that I could gather up, I quite with Marlin and bought the Browning BLR and am very happy with it.
Yes I still shoot and hunt with the 336/35RC. I belive the 35 Remington has a place in the bush, and Iwill never sell the one I have.It has a tight bore, ballard rifling the straight stock,and butter smooth action. Who could ask for anything more than more calipiers?
Happ
 

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That article does nothing to actually promote the 358 or what it is capable of. Converting a rifle to a 9mm Super Magnum and marketing the conversion under the guise of the 358 is an insult. Of course it worked for him. That skinny little .355 bullet is going to virtually slither down the bore like the slippery snake that the author must be. To suggest that any authentic 358 loads, loads that actually give due credit to the 358, can actually be used reliably in the conversion requires a leap of great proportion into the vast abyss of assumption. The Marlin is a strong rifle alright but it does have its limits. I believe that true 358 loads exceed them.
 
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