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Hey folks, I'm about to start working up a load for my .35 REM, and was thinking of using Alliant Reloader 7 powder. I'm thinking of starting at 29 grains and working up in half grain increments to 31 grains. I'll be using Remington brass, Remington 200 gr. Core Lokt bullets, and Remington 9 1/2 primers. What do you think of this combination and start load? If any of you use Reloader 7 and have a favorite load, I'd appreciate your passing it alone. Thanks.
 

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I have been kind of watching to see if anyone is loading the 35 with Varget as I load others with this and like it but have not tried it in the 35. How did you come to RL-7??? Just curious. JOHN
 

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Retiredsf
According to my lee reloading manual the starting load for the 200 gr. bullet is 27.8 and the maximum load is 31.0 gr. With the reloader 7. So it should be a safe load as long as you work up slowly and watch for signs of pressure. I have not used reloader 7 to reload the 35 rem. yet. But I have used it on many other calibers with good results.
I do have a good load for the 35 rem but its not with reloader 7.


H 335 = 38.0 gr.
remington 200 gr. RN.
cci 200 primer
COL.2.520

This was my hunting load before I sold my 35.. :roll:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
John, I think it was the Alliant web site where I ran across the combination, and then I had posted on another forum and someone there recommended it. I just bought some the other day, so I'm going to be trying some different combinations with it to see how it behaves.
DD444 I appreciate the recipe. I've heard a lot of other folks recommend the same powder. I'll have to be giving that a try also. Thanks fellas. Ron
 

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retiredsf, I'm using 33.0 grains of Reloader 7 in my .35 Rem loads, with the 200 gr. Rem Corelokt bullet, R-P brass and Federal 210 primers. Gives about 1 1/2" groups @ 100 yards in my 336. Accuracy is not as good with Winchester or CCI primers. 33.0 grains is the maximum in the Lyman manual and I worked up to it carefully. Seems mild in my gun. Can't tell you the velocity as I don't have a chronograph, but it's surely faster than factory loads. Hope this helps you.
 

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Reloder 7 is not the same powder it used to be, in that it is now made in Sweden, is uncoated (no graphite) and larger in grain size, and lacks the colored granules of the old stuff made in the U.S.

Some of the data you have may have been worked up with the older variety RL7, so that may explain some variation in charges as found in the various manuals. The load lossking mentions from the Lyman manual was produced using the old, U.S. manufactured Reloder 7. He's right about the velocity being faster than factory loads, as 33 grains of the old stuff will get around 2150, depending upon temperature. With old RL7 and 70 degree temperatures, 34 grains under 200 grain roundnoses produced around 2200 fps and was a standard loading for the .35. Loading density is not especially high but it worked fine for me for years.

With the new RL7, load density is still rather low, in that there is still some airspace in the case with standard charges.

In my two 336's, both 20" Microgroove:
30 grains 1923 to 1991 fps
31 grains 1938 to 2045 fps
32 grains 2049 to 2106 fps
33 grains 2093 to 2140 fps

As you can see, 33 grains is faster than factory loads by quite a bit (just as lossking mentioned) but exceeding factory load speed is no great trick when handloading the .35.

A lot of the variation in velocities (and overlap of speeds with different powder charges) is from varying powder position in the case due to the low loading density-some powder is near the bullet, some near the primer, etc. depending upon how it sloshes around in the case when chambered. As the case gets more powder, the variation will go down, but there is plenty of room in the case to pack it full and blow yourself up with RL7. I would consider any charge that gets 2200 fps as maximum, and that looks to be around 34.0 grains with the new stuff (in my .35's), pretty much the same speed as 34 grains got with old RL7. I don't claim the powders have the exact same burning rate, as that would be a dangerous assumption. I'm just reporting what I found in my guns. In my guns, I consider 33.0 grains (lossking's load) or 34 grains (what I shoot) perfectly usable and safe in the .35, IMO.

RL7, the new variety, is a really good powder for full power loads in the .25-20. Loading density is 100% in this application. Velocities are high, pressures low. Just thought I'd throw that in there. Good luck. You should find a suitable load using it in the .35 Remington, although now I believe some other powders surpass it in the old woods cartridge.
 

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Though you might like some H335 data too, since DD 444 mentioned it.

39.0/H335/200 RN 2130 fps, temperature dependent.

42.0H335/180 Speer 2300-2380 fps, temperature dependent.

These loads were printed in the Hodgdon data manual for many years; reference their 25th and 26th editions. Although these loads are higher than are printed now, they are perfectly safe and give the same velocities now as they did when they were developed. I have fired many rounds using these loads, with perfect results. They are well suited to the .35.

Email me if you need more information, or have any questions. The .35 Remington is easy and rewarding to handload.
 

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For the record, my RL7 is the "old" variety. Although I only bought the can a couple of years ago, it says it was made in the USA and the powder has those relatively few little red, green and yellow granules mixed in. Thus far, I've found 33.0 grains to be the most accurate in my 20" 336SC, at least with the other components listed in my post above. Point of impact is 4" to 5" higher at 100 yards than with 200 grain factory loads, so I believe the velocity is considerably improved. Another reason to buy a chronograph and stop guessing. Still, based on the Lyman manual and 35remington's findings, I think I'm in the 2,150 fps range. This is a considerable improvement over factory ammunition and is worth the effort. The load seems quite mild. 34.0 grains gave no obvious sign of excessive pressure, although groups were substantially larger in my rifle.

It's annoying that Alliant has changed RL7 on us. Even though it must be very similar to the old stuff, I will feel compelled to work up to 33.0 grains again when using the new Swedish type.
 

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35Remington,

Thanks for the input on RL7, I did not know there had been a change so this is good to know. I've been using RL7 this past year for full-power loads in my .458 Win Mags and like this powder alot. When I read this post it prompted me to grab the cannister of RL7 I've been using and see if it was the New or Old version... Mine is Made in Sweden and has no colored granules, so thankfully I'm using the newer RL7 (otherwise I'd feel compelled to work up a new loading again once I ran out of the old and had to resort to the new). It is frustrating for those who had loadings of the old RL7 and may or may not get the same performance out of the new.

In summary then is the New RL7 bulkier or less bulky at equal velocities in a given cartridge? It sounds like the bulk is very very similar. For the .458 Win Mag it's limited case capacity results in compressed loadings with some powders and this is where RL7 was a blessing as it achieves full velocity potential in the .458 Win without the powder being compressed - I'm getting 2130fps with the Hornady 500gr JRN with 99% case capacity in my #1 with no signs of pressure and 1.2" goups.

For all we know this new RL7 may be a better performer, though I'm being optimistic in that suggestion. Only time and experience will tell for sure... I do think the powder companies should make more clear announcements when such changes are made, as the loading community likes to be aware of these things!
 

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[
RL7, the new variety, is a really good powder for full power loads in the .25-20. Loading density is 100% in this application. Velocities are high, pressures low. Just thought I'd throw that in there. Good luck. You should find a suitable load using it in the .35 Remington, although now I believe some other powders surpass it in the old woods cartridge.[/quote]

Ayup to that in the 25-20! I've just got a jug of the new Reloader 7, and Rx 10, and splurged and got an 8#-er of the new 410 as well. Haven't been doing anything with my 35Rem lately, but #7 does very well in the 356Win, and 444M. I'm hoping to achieve better load densities and lower pressures with the Rx10. Important with cast boolits IMO.
410 is giving very heady results in the 44Mag, and in the 25-20 with a 82gr checked cast is pushing 2100fps, I must confess a lil' hot, but jeez does it shoot well! Got some different brass to play with and some Fed match small rifle primers too.
I'm finding the 100% load density theory working well for me, vary powder speed to acheive same and consistent ballistics, and accuracy, improve.
Cheers all,
R*2
 
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