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There are people converting them to different calibers, but your money might be better spent on dies and a press if you don't have one. The .35 rem can be loaded a lot better than what you'll get from Winchester, Federal, or Remington. Buffalo Bore makes a cartridge with the 220gr speer bullet loaded to 2200 fps. According to their table, with a 100yd zero, it's down 8.4 inches at 200 yards. They are about two bucks a pop, though.
 

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carm malendrino, Knerr brought up some good points about reloading for the .35. I do not reload but in shooting the .35 for the past 3 years I do not feel underpowered with factory loads.

Last year I used the 150 gr for deer hunting but will go back to the 200 gr slug next season. To make a long story short I have reason to believe the Remington's 150 gr bullet may not expand reliably.

If you hunt in a dense area the .35 is almost unmatched in overall performance with factory loads or reloads. You don't want to wind up trying to make the .35 something it isn't. For consistant shots greter than 150 yards you'd be better served with a rifle intended for a longer, open range capabilitiy.

SS
 

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Gotta remember that a 35 is a 35 even if you polish the shells and brush her teeth. The 35 is great brush gun or out to 150yds. then its time to change to something else. Take a good look at the Rem. 200's at 100yds. down to 10 yds. They don't get up. About more distance you gotta--------

SpikeMaster49 8) :lol: 8) :lol: 8) :lol:
 

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You can handload the Speer 180 grain flat nose bullet to 2350-2400fps without a problem.

This load makes it an easy 200 yard cartridge with about the same power as the 300 savage/307 winchester.

I use this load exclusively and it just hammers deer.
 

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I am in agreement with the thoughts above. You can tweek the 35 Rem safely to little higher velocity, but why? The 35 Rem is a great cartridge for 150 yds and less. I just don't get this business of trying to make a silk purse of a sow's ear.

If you want to kick major _$$ with a 35 caliber firearm, get a 35 Whelen or 358 Win. or the like. The Whelen with 250 gr. or 225 gr. factory ammo has a trajectory so close to a 30-06 out to 250 or 300 yds. that most of us cannot tell the difference.

I have one taken mule deer at approx. 200yds. with a Marlin 336 in 35 Rem. using a 2-7x scope and Remington, 200 gr., facotry ammo. One shot, one forkhorn.

When I need more oomph than my 35 Rem can provide, I move up to an '06 or 35 Whelen Model 700 with scope.
 

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I'm no expert..but "35Remington" IMHO is. Check out some of his previous posts here and at Beartooth bullets forum.

But I'll tell you what I've learned from reading for what it's worth.

35Remington has done a huge amount of research and found that the 150 grain bullet's are fine. The Remington 200 grain bullet is just about the best and most reliable for all around. And the 180 grain speer has also great performance.

But the heavier grain bullets beyond 200 grains need more velocity to expand as most of them were really made for the faster 358 win and 35 whelen etc. The one exception would be the 220 grain Buffalo bore factory stuff but again that is a "hot load" at like $40 a box.

Again go try to reseach some old posts for the information. But I'm a heavy bullet kind of guy. So my personal choices are the 200 Rem and the 180 Speer from everything I've read so far. As I'd say 99.9999% of my shots I can not see due to brush and woods beyond 100 yards flatter long distance shooting is not really an issue for me.
 

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You could make it an ackley improved I suppose, or shoot properly sized spire points loading one at a time. But hey it is a great rifle as is and it gives you an exscuse to buy another caliber for the longer shot. Such as, 336ER in 356,375, 444, 45-70, 450 or going the otherway a MR7 in 270, 25-06, etc. then you can say well I got this one for hunting in brush, this one for open areas, etc etc. Great way to add to your collection.
 

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You got me curious so I went through RCBS load looking for what other cartridges were a .358 same as the 35 Rem. Some of these are longer, shorter, fatter, belted or rebated, etc. but what got me is the comparison of loads available.

Starting with the base .358 sized bullet you have:
35 Ackley Magnum, with load data for 200, 220, 250, 275, and 300 grn bullets
35 Ackley Magnum Improved w/ data for 220, 250, 300 grn.
35 Belted Newton data 220, 250
35 GH Magnum data 180, 200, 220, 250
35 IHMSA data 170, 200, 250, 275
35 Krag data 180, 200, 225, 250
35 Lever Power, data 200
35 Magnum 180, 220, 250, 275
35 Newton 180, 200, 220, 250, 275
35 Remington, 120, 125, 140, 142, 150, 158, 159, 162, 170, 175,180, 195, 200, 204, 206, 220, 225, 250, 274
35 Whelen
35 Brown Whelen
35 Winchester
35-284
35-30/30
35-348
35-444
350 Remington Magnum
350 H&H Magnum
350 Mashburn Super Magnum
350 Smith
350-284
350x39
356 Win
357 Elliott Express
358 Barnes Supreme
358 BJ Express
358 JDJ
358 Lee Magnum
358 Norma Magnum
358 STA
358-300 Win
358 Hawk
 

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No, I believe Spikemaster49 has it right. "To shoot farther, squeeze the trigger harder." :lol: :wink: :lol: :wink: :roll:
 

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.35 Rem improvements

I gotta have a minor disagreement here. The .35 Rem is a fine old caliber and I have one. But Im looking for a second to do a conversion. Convert to what? .358 WIN, of course.

Before any of you start screaming pressure!, let me continue.

The .35 Rem is SAAMI rated at 33.5K cups. The Marlin 336 action is rated to about 44.5Kcups. "Blue pill" proofing loads are gonna take that tolerance probably to something like 70-80Kcups.

Now, the .358 Win is SAAMI listed at 52Kcups max. Over the Marlins rated pressure tolerance, yes, but not dramitically so. But, here's where it gets good.

The .356 WIN, which was chambered in the 336ER for awhile, is rated at 52K cups - JUST like the .358 WIN. I have been unable to substantiate the fact that the ER actions were specially treated to handle the slightly increased pressures were talking about here (if any one knows different, please inform).

Keeping all that in mind, here's the conversion

Reream the chamber to .358 WIN. Bingo thats it. No rebarreling, ect. I know of at least one smith who does this and to good effect.
Why bother, some will ask? Here's a short list:

+ Brass is plentiful enough. No converting or fireforming.
+ The sole factory load in .358 WIN, is loaded shy of the SAAMI max, right around the 336 limit.
+ Bullet selection is awesome as are powder combinations.
+ You get the .356 WIN boost, without having to search out a hard to find rifle and, of course, pay a premium for it. Here in South Carolina, if you ask for .356 WIN, you get that ..."oh, you must be a Yankee" look :lol:

CAVEAT: I would STRONGLY suggest that one handloads this to something below 45kcups for everyday stuff, as the full house pounding of max loads would take their toll on rifle and shooter, eventually - possibly in the worst way.

Somebody tell me what Im missing in all this and why you dont hear more about this.
 

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oldschool, if you do this conversion, limit velocities to .356 levels. It is very doubtful that 52,000 CUP for the various levergun cartridges means the same thing as some of the bolt gun cartridges. Example: 270 Winchester is 52,000 CUP, which is 65,000 psi. Assuming the 336 is up to 65,000 psi pressures would be quite erroneous. You should limit pressures to the 46,000 psi level, most likely. This will gain you .356 performance, and that's where to stop.

Ever notice there was never a psi equivalent for the .375, .356 and .307 Winchesters? There's a reason. The manufacturers do not want you assuming that pressures are the same as higher intensity cartridges and damaging your gun or yourself, and expect you to follow loading manual recommendations. What 52,000 CUP means, when applied to traditional leverguns, is "as high as we can safely push it with a decent safety margin." I expect they picked that impressive sounding figure to reassure you that they were raising pressures as high as feasible so you might avoid temptations to push it further. Remember that traditional leverguns have very poor gas handling features in the event of a blown primer or expanded primer pocket-another reason to keep pressures on the mild side. The two piece rear lockup of the 336 allows more case stretching with high intensity loads, dramatically shortening case life. Guns of this type have working pressures nowhere near 60,000 psi.

There ain't no free lunch. Keep the conversion to .356 speeds.

In addition, since the rifle will handle only a 2.57" cartridge overall length (ejection port won't pass any longer round) only the 180 and 220 Speers will work with a .358 conversion unless some additional work is done to enlarge the ejection port and modify the lifter to allow clearance. All 200 grain roundnoses and of course any of the 250 grain bullets will not work through the 336 action if they are crimped in the cannelure of the .358 bullet.

There is some dubious information floating around the internet about converting the 336 to .358. Some of it is dangerous. True .358 loads are much too stiff for the 336 action, as they are in the 60,000+ psi range. This IS dramatically more than the 336 was designed to handle. Loading manuals push the .358 Winchester to these pressure levels, and it is most inadvisable to try loading the 336 action to this level of performance. Most especially beware of some of the handloading data that was developed in bolt action rifles with longer throats than the 336, which requires a longer overall length. Duplicating these loads in a 336 with a shorter OAL will result in higher pressures and decreased brass life. Cases may separate after only a few firings at true .358 Winchester pressures, and if you do this very often you'll beat the gun to death. Your eyeballs are at risk as well, and a shooter values nothing more than his eyesight.

One notable internet .358 conversion had the author claiming he could equal a .35 Whelen when shooting .358 loads out of a 20 inch barrelled 336. If he was, God was watching out for him, for equaling a Whelen out of a short barrelled 336 is likely to change his name to "Lefty Eyepatch."

Sooner, rather than later.
 

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.

I have considered rechambering my .35 rem to the .356/358 win and I probably would if I had the money right now but I have reservations of going with the .358. I only have the Modern Reloading (Richard Lee) reloading manual that has .356 and 358 data in it. There are loads for the 358 that run right up to 52000 cup but the hottest load for the 356 is running 46600 cup. It makes me wonder if the factory ammo was treated the same way. I wouldnt trust a 336 with that much unknown going.

Now if you were using 358 brass and loading it down as you say in you post then I dont really see a problem with that. Everything should work great (dont know for sure though).
 

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I completely agree with 35remington. I still think I remember in the catalog that introduced the 356 Win round that Marlin said the reciever and barrel were specially heat treated. What it comes down to, even if you load a 35 Rem or 30-30 hot you are pushing the limits of the action over original intentions. You can do that but how much have you shortened the life of the rifle? Surely you don't think that pushing the design limits is not going to shorten the working life of the rifle? Are you endangering youself? That rear lug lets go and you won't be worrying about improving ballistics any longer! Anyone that thinks they need .358 Win should buy an appropriate rifle.
 

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Wow! I feel honored to have 35remington answer my post! Everytime Ive asked elsewhere about working with the .35 Remington, the answer is something like "Go over to the Marlin owners forum and look for stuff by this .35remington guy..."

Regardless of all the confusing pressure information and the other factors, it was never my intent to do more than load any such a conversion to .356 WIN levels. I know the .358 WIN is a round for such as the Model 99 and BLR and generates pressure in excess of the Marlin's actions limits - in fact I was little surprised when I saw the SAAMI specs for the two rounds were the same. Thats one of the reasons why I asked.

In truth, I always thought the .356 WIN in the 336 ER was such a stellar combination and have sadly lamented its demise, along with the .307. My efforts along these lines are to try and approach the improved ballistics of both of these rounds (Im looking for a .30-30, to work with, too) without looking for what amounts to "rare" guns and almost unattainable ammo.

I wasnt trying to scare anyone with my foolhardiness, so please accept my apology if I did so!

"Mr. Remington," could you direct me to some of your posts on reloading for the .35 Remington - perhaps with your good data, I will eschew the conversions altogether and just shoot the gun as is....and save my dollars for a .358 WIN BLR or 99.
 

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I have a 336ER in the 356 win. caliber and is a great shooter.My father and father-in-law has tried to buy it many times.So 2 years ago they had there 35 rem. rechambered to the 356 win.. My father-in-laws rechamber job turned out ok it shoots fine but isn't as accurate as my 336ER is..My fathers rechamber job didn't turn out so good..The gunsmith went through the gun and checked the head space replaced the firing pin and spring.But we couldn't get it to stop missfireing!!! Now its junk! It didn't missfire all the time but who wants to hunt with a gun that missfires 25% of the time..
And if you don't reload the 356 factory ammo is about 30 bucks a box..

The 336ER is a rifle that was designed to handle the higher pressures of the 356...

The 356 is basically a rimmed 358 win. for use in traditional leveraction rifles.The 356 shares most external dimensions with the 358 win. But the 356 win has heavier thicker case walls that reduce its case capacity..

If you have a 336 in the 35 rem. you have a great gun in its own right.You can get more out of it by reloading..But if your wanting a gun to shoot 300 yards the 35 rem isn't the gun to do it with..Personaly if I wanted a 358 win. I would buy one in a BLR and not take a chance in junking out a good gun or lossing my eyesite..
 

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Well, jeez, guys, I like surfing the internet like everybody else. I've always liked the 336 forum. And the cartridge. Some good discussions here. Good guys too.

Anyway. Work comes early tomorrow, we'll see about some things after then.
 

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The Hornady Leverevolution in 35Rem shoots exceptionally well in my rifle. At 200yds it is on 1.3" low and at 300yds it is 17.5" low. I don't think a guy can load much better than this. They run about $19.00 a box and thats not to bad for this round.

Buffalo Bores rounds are about the same but they cost $40 per box. You can gain significantly with the Hornady round and never have to change the rifle. Great rifle and shoots well, has taken a lot of game from deer to big bears (not recommended for big bears).

If you want something that gives you a big boost look for a Marlin 375 I think this is a much bigger hunting round.

fknipfer
 

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fknipfer said:
The Hornady Leverevolution in 35Rem shoots exceptionally well in my rifle. At 200yds it is on 1.3" low and at 300yds it is 17.5" low. I don't think a guy can load much better than this. They run about $19.00 a box and thats not to bad for this round.

If you want something that gives you a big boost look for a Marlin 375 I think this is a much bigger hunting round.

fknipfer
I agree on both points!
I have the 336 in .35 Rem and will be trying the Hornady ammo. I have heard nothing but good results so far in all calibers.
If I need more oomph than that I have the Marlin .375 and other calibers.

Rick Jamison wrote a good article on loads for the .35 Rem in the May 2006 issue of Shooting Times magazine.
He stated it runs close to 1000ft/lbs of energy @ 150 yds and is intended for deer and black bear sized game within that range.
"Stick with it's intended purpose and you have one effective deer round for close-cover hunting."
 

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Not trying to start an argument here, but if you want more than the Buffalo Bore 220 or +P .35 Remington gives, I'd suggest going to the .444 Marlin or .45-70. Good luck finding a .375. It's a very fine round, but rifles in this caliber are scarce as hen's teeth.

For whatever it's worth the .375 has a bit smaller case capacity than the .35 Remington. If both are loaded to similar pressures any difference in performance would be minor.

Hmm. Food for thought.

And I certainly second the idea of trying the LeverEvolution factory ammo, for handloaders and nonhandloaders alike. It's very good stuff.

Oldschool, a PM has been sent your way.
 
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