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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was interested to see what accuracy you guys get from handloads, or factory ammo, in your .35 Remington 336’s.

What is your most accurate, bullet, powder, primer combo?

I have been loading mostly with IMR powders, and have found that their 3031 works quite well.

I have been also shooting mostly Hornady 200gr RN, and Sierra 200gr RN bullets. I would like to obtain some Remington Core Lokt bullets, but no one sells them here in Alaska, and shipping from Midway USA is prohibitively expensive.

What success have you had with different primer manufacturers? I have almost consistently used CCI primers.

This is the load I used yesterday to shoot 1 1/8” group at one hundred yards. Granted, this was off a rest, lying prone with several minutes in between shots to allow cooling of the barrel.

Remington Case
CCI 200LR Primer
36grs IMR 3031
Hornady 200gr RN with light crimp.

Let me know what type of results you have been able to achieve with different handloads.
Also let me know what loads have worked well for you on hunts.

Thanks,
Greebe (Dave Sims)
Sutton, Alaska
 

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Dave,
1-1/8" @ 100yds is fantastic. I wouldn't look any farther. The only down side is the HDY bullet. They do not expand as well as the Rem and Sierra. They have always been more accurate for me as well.
 

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Greebe,
I use 39.5 Grs. of IMR 4320 with a 200Gr. Hornady bullet loaded in Federal cases with a Winchester LR primer.
I use these loads in a 336 35 Rem manufactured in 1958 with a 16.25" Micro Groove barrel.
They chrono at 1980 FPS and produce < (less) than 3/4" 3 shot groups at 100 yards off the bench. This rifle/ammo has been shooting groups like this for years.

Oh, I almost forgot to mention, I have NO complaints about the performance (expansion) of Steve Hornady's bullets.

Tomray
NRA LIFE
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Duckbill,
I hope to be able to get a box of the Rem 200’s, but unless I leave Alaska I will probably not end up with any. I do have some family coming up next month, maybe I could have them locate some and bring them up.
In the mean time I think I will do some testing with the sierra 200 and see what I can do with it.

Tomray,
Have you used the Hornady on small deer. I was planning on using this load for Sitka Blacktail dear and they are on the small side. It can be easy to over penetrate on such a small animal.

Thanks guys,
Greebe
 

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Greebe,
That load has worked very well on White tail at 60-120 yards, and also on Black bear at 70-80 yards. The bear was a 1 shot kill were it stood, and the various deer don't seem to go too far.
Bullet expansion must be good, as the exit wounds shows it to be so.........I have not recovered any projectiles, but I'm satisfied.

Tomray
NRA LIFE
 

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Overpenetration with the 35 Remington is a fact of life, expansion is what I strive for. The only bullet that's not going to exit a small deer is a pistol bullet, in my neck of the woods. I like the Rem 200 core-lokt in factory loads AND handloads, great accuracy and excellent expansion. On Sitka Deer it's like using a cannon, but it works!

Papajohn
 

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The only factory bullet I would suggest you not use is the Remington Corlokt 150's. They are fine for punching paper but I have found they do not expand reliably. Ironically, of the Remington factory fodder they are the most accurate.

The best group I have printed with my .35 was in Ranch Dog's PMIII. A little <1.5" is the best I have done using Federal Premium 200 gr loads. Because of time constraints I do not reload.

SS
 

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I'll second the advice to skip the Core-Lokt 150's, they do NOT expand well, and in my rifle, they are anything but accurate. The 200-grainers are far superior, and if you want something a tad lighter, Speer's 180-grain flat point is an excellent bullet. I get good expansion and terrific accuracy with it, in nearly any load combo. For many years that was all I used in my 35's, it's certainly worth a try.

Papajohn
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey thanks guys.

I just got back from a hunt out to Naked Island here in Alaska. Took one dow with the Hornady 200 RN. The bullet seemed to work well on this deer with a neck shot. Took her down fast. This is the first deer I have shot with the .35 Rem in a 336. I must say it did a good job.

Here is the kicker though. I missed a shot at a large buck accompanied by two doe’s.
--Here is why. I had a twenty-yard shot. When I pulled the trigger, nothing. “ *#%! ”, I said under my breath. Then I rechambered another round and the buck and two doe’s were gone before I could get another shot. The primer of the misfired round was barely dented. I don’t know if it could be a head spacing problem or what? But I can say that it made me very grumpy until I shot the doe later that day.

I am going to take the Marlin to a gunsmith and have them take a look at it. Hopefully it can be fixed, because I really liked carrying this gun on this hunt.

My two hunting buddies thought I was nuts to carry a lever gun with such a small bullet. I just laughed at them for carrying .338 WinMag’s for Sitka Blacktails. The deer they shot with the .338’s, didn’t have much meat left, but mine did. I think that proved my point.

Overall the hunt was good. Would have been great if I would have got that buck, but that is the way it goes sometimes.

Later,
Greebe
 

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Greebe, if it's handloaded ammunition and you get a light firing pin strike the first thing I'd look for is operator error. Did you size the case enough, or do something to prevent the rifle from locking up properly? Was the primer seated correctly?

Just some thoughts from a guy that's been there. A headspacing problem might have more to do with the ammunition than the rifle, if the other rounds worked correctly.
 

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My 35 shoots better with the hooded sight removed. I'm certain a Physics major can explain this but it is a mystery to me.

I'll have to dig out my reload data later. But I could never improve upon Remington with any 200 grain bullet. But the 180 grain Speer produced best velocity at 175 yards and trajectory is improved as well.

In my opinion, 35 Remington does its best work within about 150 yards or so. Try to stretch its lethality much beyond this range and results upon big game animals are less than ideal.
Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
35Remington

The thing that is strange to me is that I have reloaded just under a thousand rounds for the 35Rem and have never had this problem.

Lock up was fine; I looked at that as well when out in the field.

The primers were seated a little low in the case on the rounds that didn’t fire. I talked to CCI, and they said that the misfire was most likely due to lack of seating depth. I don’t think that I agree with that because the round I fired at the doe, which went off, was seated less deep.

As for case sizing I always size full length to eliminate any chambering problems.

I suspect that it could be head spacing because there seams to be just a little bit of play between the bolt face and the head of the rim of the cartridge. It may very well be the right amount though, I don’t know.

The other thing that I thought about was maybe the cases that I was using were getting to old. I don’t know if this would cause any problems as I have not had this problem before.

Oh yeah I did clean the primer pocket before loading this batch as well.

Am I forgetting anything else? I think that is it.

Let me know what you think.

Thanks,
Greebe
 

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Greebe said:
The primer of the misfired round was barely dented. I don’t know if it could be a head spacing problem or what? But I can say that it made me very grumpy until I shot the doe later that day.
Greebe, one thing to check if you haven't already -- is there any debris or gunk in the firing pin channel? I've never had a problem with something binding up the firing pin in a Marlin, but I have seen it in other rifles. I have a friend who had a Swedish Mauser that had intermittent misfires that were driving him nuts until I disassembled the bolt and found a tiny, diamond-hard seed of some type in the channel. Evidently, it moved around just enough so that when it was oriented like THIS the rifle fired, but when oriented like THAT he got a light strike.
 

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Super interesting accounts by Pisga, Jack O' and as always 35 Remington. This is very helpful info for anyone shooting any rifle.

Great thread Greebe, sorry for your trouble but some really good suggestiions for a cure.

SS
 

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The only misfires I've had like this were because of primers that were not fully seated. I'm sure you have enough reloading experience to not do that. With any of the misfires did you simply recock and fire? When I had poorly seated primers that did the trick.

Next Q is about your sizing. Someone else mentioned that if you set the shoulder back too far it can cause problems. I too FL resize to avoid any problems that might arise with feeding and such in the field. If you have any factory loaded ammo around do a visual on the shoulder of the factory round and yours. If you have set the shoulder back much at all it may have been right at 'too' much sometimes.
 

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An obscure but possible cause might be a pistol primer that got mixed up with the rifle primers-maybe unlikely, but some of the boxes look alike. From cup to anvil pistol primers are a bit shorter, and seat deeper in the primer pocket, oftentimes enough to cause misfires. When I used large pistol primers to experiment with less forceful ignition in light cast bullet loads, my Savage .30-06 would have light firing pin strikes, and about half the rounds wouldn't go off. This would vary by rifle used.

If you still have the case that misfired, perhaps you could check it for excessive primer pocket depth. Most dies and presses won't shorten a case so much that the cartridge won't fire unless you have out of spec dies-again, unlikely. More than one case should have misfired if it was sized with all the rest and headspace was too great.

Yeah, I know, it's all a longshot, but if you have monotonous reliability with primer ignition otherwise you've got to look at the unlikely possibilities as well.

To get back on topic, I've had good results with IMR 3031 and the 200 grain bullets as well. I use the IMR recommendation of 37.5 grains under the 200 grain Core-Lokt most often-it's as accurate as my guns will shoot 200's and a very good deer load. The RCBS 200 FNGC does well with 33-35 grains IMR 3031, which essentially duplicates the velocity of the Remington 200 factory load.

I've also had good luck with 39.0 grains H335 for around 2130 fps. The same charge of 748 gets the same velocity, with equal accuracy. Ramshot TAC also shows good promise and is very clean burning at 2200-2250 fps.

Actually, I've shot a number of powders that do well. I look for a caseful of powder to keep velocity variations down, and IMR 3031 certainly seems like the best of the IMR series for use in the .35 with the 180 and 200 grain bullets.
 

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This is probably a dumb question from a reader but not a reloader:

But what percentage of primers are duds?

Nothing a human makes is perfet 100% of the time. Is it possible that the primer in question was simply the "one in a million" that is a dud?

But I guess a dud wouldn't explain the barely a dent condition.
 

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I used to live in East Alton, Illinois, home of Olin/Winchester, and have several friends/relatives that work there. Some have been involved in the manufacture of primers, and have explained the process to me. While it's possible to get a primer with less than normal amounts of priming compound, one with little to none would be about impossible, as they are visually inspected as they're filled. The minimal dent in the primer tells me the firing pin hit was light, the cup is thicker/harder than normal, or the primer wasn't seated fully. My guess is the latter.

When bullets don't go bang, it's nearly always a mechanical problem. With rimfires, it's 50/50, but with centerfires, I'd look to the gun for the problem, or the loaded round, but rarely if ever is it the primer. There are so many possible variables it's hard to isolate them, but the deep pocket is one possibility. My suspicion leans more toward a headspace problem. I use Federal primers when I can get them, W-W primer cups are harder, CCI are the worst. But if factory ammo goes bang every time, and your handloads don't, I'd check the die settings. Hope this helps.

PJ
 
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