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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a .35 336sc I bought used in the early 90's. I didn't use it very much back then and even less in the last 10 years. It's been in the cabinet for the last 5 and only used when a friend needed a rifle to deer hunt with. Anyway, I have recently had a renewed interest in this lever action and actually consider it to be one of my best rifles, although ammo is getting harder and harder to find. Well, I'm at the range sighting it in a few months ago when I noticed (and felt) the butt stock was loose. On further examination I could see a small crack on the top of the stock coming from where the screw secures the stock to the receiver. Today I took the stock off and realized the "crack" was actually a split. How do I fix this??? Buying a new stock is out of the question for multiple reasons. I can't separate the split enough to put some wood glue in it. My though was to drill a hole right behind the screw hole and screw in a Stainless Steel finishing screw and simply wood putty over the hole. Would this work? Thanks to all that respond!

Mike

PS It's kinda hard to make out the split in the pic, so you have to look hard..:)
 

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Does the stocks split go from top to bottom? I can see it in your pic very plain.

Super glue is very runny and will seek openings. I would put the action in a padded vise slip on the buttstock and give a little sideways pressure and see if it does open on the top. Don't over do it. If it opens a little get some epoxy or super glue and form a ditch with some tape around the split, put pressure on it pour the glue into the ditch and let it seep in.

#2. You can drill very small holes along the split and squirt epoxy into the stock.

The split along the screw hole can be glued by taping and letting the glue seep in. When done bed the tang area and where it butts to the action this will prevent further cracks.



Bottom line, click the link below it will show several stocks yours a walnut is the most expensive, the birch for $28 the least. Pretty much if it is pistol grip they are all the same for many years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, the split goes from the bottom (pictured) to the top. What do you mean "tape around the split"? I was initially thinking of using some type of glue, but the split doesn't open very much at all. Are you saying to put several layers of tape to make the ditch walls? Is my idea using the SS finish screw a bad one?
 

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The biggest problem with a screw is it wont squeeze the pieces together unless you use one with an unthreaded section beneath the head and the threads end up on one side of the crack with the head on the other. You'ld be surprised how well super glue will wick into a crack like that. I'v fixed several by opening them as wide as I could (not much) & useing superglue, just be sure its the very runny liquid type. I'd use something as a wedge to very carefully spread it. I think Swany is talking about a piece or several along each side of the crack to help chanel it. At any rate that would be my first try. If it dont work you can try a screw, dowel, or whatever. Like I said I surprised myself several times when superglue worked out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you very much Swany and Leverdude. I think you're correct about the super-glue. At least that's the least intrusive method to begin with and I'm gonna try it. Sorry to be a pain in the rear with the questions, but could you recommend a particular brand? Also, Leverdude, good advise with the thread all the way up to the head of the screw. If, indeed, I have to go that route I wouldn't have thought of that. Again, both of you, I REALLY appreciate the advise.
 

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No sweat, its our pleasure. ;)
As far as particular brand I'm not sure it matters as long as its not thick. The bottle on my bench right now is Lok Tite brand but all that means is its the one I grabbed. I think theyre all pretty much the same other than consistencies & applicators.
If this dont work I might try drilling holes from inside the inletting that cross the crack and fill those with epoxy. Either way you want to clamp the stock together to squeeze that crack as tight as possible while the glue sets up. Before I used a screw like you mentioned I'd probably drill a 1/4" or 3/8" hole from side to side, glue a dowel in there and try to stain it to match.

On another note if you wanted to just replace it theyre easy to find. Theres several on E-bay right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Leverdude said:
No sweat, its our pleasure. ;)
As far as particular brand I'm not sure it matters as long as its not thick. The bottle on my bench right now is Lok Tite brand but all that means is its the one I grabbed. I think theyre all pretty much the same other than consistencies & applicators.
If this dont work I might try drilling holes from inside the inletting that cross the crack and fill those with epoxy. Either way you want to clamp the stock together to squeeze that crack as tight as possible while the glue sets up. Before I used a screw like you mentioned I'd probably drill a 1/4" or 3/8" hole from side to side, glue a dowel in there and try to stain it to match.

On another note if you wanted to just replace it theyre easy to find. Theres several on E-bay right now.
I'm gonna try the super-glue first, but that's a fantastic idea with the dowel! I like that a lot better than a screw.

And you'll have to excuse my ignorance, but other than it being a Marlin 336sc in .35 rem I have no idea what I have. And honestly don't care. It's just a fine rifle that I wanna re-connect with. In saying that, while trying to simply replace the stock I sorta had to read a lot of stuff concerning the rifle. Some will fit, while others won't.?? 1954 or 1990? Right now, paying $100 for a butt stock is just too much. That on top of not really knowing what will fit and what won't just isn't feasible. I would like a laymens explanation of what I own, but I see guys asking this question in thread after thread. I've tried to read them all, but am more confused now than I was when I started. HAHA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Leverdude, if I use the dowel method, where would you insert it? before the screw (towards the receiver) right ahead of the screw hole for securing it to the rifle? Or after, towards the back of the stock?
 

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I have repaired two 35's. One cracked the other with the tab broken completely off. Used super glue. Clamped and left for 24 hours. Haven't had one come apart yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
handirandy said:
I have repaired two 35's. One cracked the other with the tab broken completely off. Used super glue. Clamped and left for 24 hours. Haven't had one come apart yet.
That seems to be the consensus. I'm certainly glad I stopped by here before I attempted to repair it myself.
 

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You'll never get the dowel's stain to match. Its end grain is what will be exposed and it has different porosity than the rest of the sock. It will likely stain much darker. Try the the super glue first.
 

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I suggest a good two part epoxy, thinned with acetone to make it runney and put all you can in the crack. Then clamp for about 24 hours ar room temperature. Super glue may work, I just have never had good luck with it. May be my technique. Good luck, Jack
 

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And, if you go with epoxy, use the slow cure kind. It will take a good 24 hours to completely cure, but it will be much stronger than the quick cure kind. I used to build a lot of fishing rods for heavy salt water use, and I always used the slow cure kind in high stress areas like attaching reel seats. I never had one let go except when I tried the 5-minute stuff when I was in a hurry once.
 

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Brian, I guess that is what I should have said instead of calling it "the good 2 part epoxy." You are correct in the cure time too. IMO it is way ahead of the fast stuff and super glue. Others' mileage may varry. Good day, Jack
 

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I've repaired a number of stocks using a high quality two part epoxy. You can add fillers to the epoxy mix to stregthen it further. At times I've drilled small holes into the stock in areas not visible when installed. By injecting epoxy into the hole using a syringe, it creates a very strong mechanical bone just like a screw would do. However, the epoxy will fill cracks and make the repair stronger then the original wood.
 

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MGofPickens said:
I'm gonna try the super-glue first, but that's a fantastic idea with the dowel! I like that a lot better than a screw.

And you'll have to excuse my ignorance, but other than it being a Marlin 336sc in .35 rem I have no idea what I have. And honestly don't care. It's just a fine rifle that I wanna re-connect with. In saying that, while trying to simply replace the stock I sorta had to read a lot of stuff concerning the rifle. Some will fit, while others won't.?? 1954 or 1990? Right now, paying $100 for a butt stock is just too much. That on top of not really knowing what will fit and what won't just isn't feasible. I would like a laymens explanation of what I own, but I see guys asking this question in thread after thread. I've tried to read them all, but am more confused now than I was when I started. HAHA.
Tell us what the serial number starts with and we can tell you when the gun was made. Some pictures would also be nice. Is it drilled and tapped for a scope? Does it have the thick "perch belly" forearm? The guys on here know their stuff, so just give us a little info and post some pics and we'll tell you in a jiffy what you have.

Here is my 1957 336SC in 35 Remington:



 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I went with the super-glue method first because that was the least "intrusive". It seems to have made a strong bond, and I put the stock back on and there is no more movement. I'll keep an eye on it when I am at the range and if it breaks I'll go with the 2 part epoxy method.

Again, thanks to all your help with this.

Mike
 

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I've not worked on stocks, but I have done a good bit of work on antique furniture, and I wouldn't recommend either super glue of epoxy. Super glue tends to break down under solvents, and (in my opinion) weakens over time. Epoxy is tempermental and can break free from things it does not penetrate (like dry wood). I would recommend a good quality of waterproof (exterior) wood glue thinned about 2/1 (2 parts glue) with warm water. The thinning will allow it to seep into the crack (it would be best if you could spread the crack some, if only a tiny bit to work the glue in) and penetrate into the wood. It would also be best to clamp the wood by wrapping a cord around it and twisting the cord with a small rod to tighten.
 

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MGofPickens said:
Leverdude, if I use the dowel method, where would you insert it? before the screw (towards the receiver) right ahead of the screw hole for securing it to the rifle? Or after, towards the back of the stock?
Its hard to say without it in my hands but probably forward of the screw. I'd make sure the tangs arent overly tight too. They taper & if theyre too tight they can split the stock over time from recoil. The stock should slip right on & stop solidle against the reciever flare. Alot from the factory have a gap at the flare & the tangs are tight, seems to me thats a recipe for disaster.

As someone mentioned it'll be hard to get the dowel to match. I'd recomend trying a lighter stain initially & finding one that acts right on the end grain of the dowel before even starting. Wood glue works good too like Tomjohn said. I dont know how it'll hold up to the solvents & things but it may be fine.

Its easy to date a Marlin. If theres no letter prefix just subtract the first two numbers from 2000 should work for your gun. In other words if its 25XXXXX its made in 1975 If its got a letter prefix you can find the date in our reference library or just post it & someone will tell you.
 

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I haven't had the same problem but have read a number of stock and military hand guard crack fix posts on other forums and Gorilla Glue seems to be a real favorite for your type of stock crack. Use dental floss to work the Gorilla glue throughout the crack and interior crack surfaces, wipe clean and then wrap tightly, surgical tubing works great. Of course the dowel method will add additional strength but you might not really be pleased with the final appearance of the dowels.
 
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