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Discussion Starter #1
I know there are a lot of posts on this topic, but I cannot find the specific information I'm looking for, which is why I'm posting here. Any help is appreciated!

This week I finally purchased a 336W to add to my collection. I already have a 1895G and 1894C.

I live in CA, so I have about seven more days to wait until I can officially pick up my new rifle. In the meantime, I'm hoping to order a recoil pad to replace the factory buttplate.

I'm mostly looking for felt recoil reduction. I'm not interested in a slip on, for aestetics, and from what I've read, I don't trust pre-fit to actually fit well.

So here's my question, what size grind-to-fit pad do I need?

I know the main brands come in small, medium, and large. Is the variance in stock size enough with these rifles where the answer is "depends on the measurements of your specific stock?" Or can I safely assume a specific grind-to-fit size will always be the "right" starting size for the 336?

Sorry if I'm beating on a dead horse. I'm just excited for the new rifle and want to get going on this recoil pad.
 

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Measure your width and length of the buttstock, compare that to the dealers specs, order the one that fits closest, also be aware you might have to plug the holes in the buttstock to attach the new pad as screw mounting holes may not line up.
Bought a pachmeyr for the 444, needs to be sanded down some more but it'll do until I get there. http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/444-marlin/191079-vented-recoil-pad.html#post2402248
So you have an idea of how much I had to grind down....helps to have a stationary belt sander.
http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/444-marlin/171689-what-recoil-pad.html#post2134757
 

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I'm afraid I'm a cheap bast.... Uh... Frugal so and so. I have a Past Recoil Pad I wear to shoot every rifle I own... 1 pad, many guns, no grinding...
 

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I'd get one off Numrich specifically for the 336. If it fit one, it may only need a teensy alteration to fit another.
 
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I am very unhappy with my "prefit" limbsaver pad. The pad itself functions great but fits horribly. All the profit pads are for a range of stocks, but don't fit any particular stock perfectly. If you want that seamless fit so it looks like it was meant to be there. The best option is a grind to fit. I have used several limbsavers and have been very happy with them, and am likely to swap out my prefit one on the 336 soon.
 

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As Mr F indicated - measure your stock with the recoil pad removed - I am familiar with Limbsaver, as I like and use them so that is what I can offer advice on, I am sure there are other quality products out there.

The Limbsaver website has schematics with dimensions for the 'foot print' of pads, match up to the grind to fit that is the closest to your needs.

When I am fitting/Grinding a pad these are the basic steps I follow.
* Buy the closest fit pad
* Plug old screw holes - I make a small dowel and glue it in.
* Carefully Duct Tape the stock - I use 2 layers for the rough grinding to give me a little more stock protection in case I touch the stock to the belt - Then reduce to one layer for
the final fit.
* Mount the pad to the stock
* I like to 'grind' the pad with it attached to the stock as it allows me to maintain continuity of the stock lines to the Pad
* I use a horizontal bench top belt sander - Go slowly and carefully - not something to rush through - I use 80 - 120 belt for initial removal and finish with 220 ish
* When I get down close to the duct tape I will usually remove the layers near the butt and replace with a fresh single layer for the final grind
* When the pad is fitted I remove it from the stock and will use a hand sanding block to clean up the hard plastic and any frills or 'ripple' in the rubber.
* To finish is use a Q Tip to wipe Super glue around the hard plastic edge - a very little Black it up - I also use super glue to cover the top portion of the rubber that tends to catch
on clothing as the rifle is shouldered (old Trap/Skeet Shooter trick) this seals off the rubber and makes it slide past clothing.

Good luck and have fun
 

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Meachbear,

I like the leather lace-on recoil pads. They class up the rifle and Kick Killer.jpg are good for reducing recoil. Google Action Products Kick Killer. About $42 with shipping.

Rob
 
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As Mudge said, you can also use PVC Electrical tape to mask the stock. You MAY want to use a breathing mast some pads create very fine just.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
From the posts so far, it seems I really need to wait on the stock and order the pad based on measuring.

rob42049, thanks for the input on the lace-up. The reason I wanted to avoid a rubber slip on is because I plan to make a lace up leather "saddle" that will hold a few additional cartridges. I think the rubber slip on would look tacky with a nice handmade leather piece. BUT, maybe the answer is to modify my leather design to include a buttpad, similar to the Kick Killer.

Nothing fancy, but here's the one I made for my guide gun...

487302_10151341455708068_703517749_n.jpg 65976_10151341455733068_130216960_n.jpg 11297_10151341455478068_1353077076_n.jpg
 

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Meachbear:

Inside the Kick Killer is a 21st Century high-tech sorbothane pad about 1/2" thick. Really tames the hurt. You might be able to find sorbothane and incorporate it into your work.


Rob
 
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Nice leather work....

For the grind to fit recoil pads I used to have good luck just eyeballing them and using a coarse grit belt sander 99% of the work, but when the gummy type recoil pads come out I tried one of the limbsavers and made a mess. Maybe it was something I done wrong, maybe it was the recoil pad I remember them having a recall, but what and absolute mess it made just gummed up melted glue all over belt, recoil pad etc. I liked the limbsaver tho, and the next time I mailed off a Super x model 1 buttstock to a stock maker to fit when I got it back I noticed really coarse grind marks, but it fit perfect. The recoil pad was outstanding it had a angle on the bottom to not catch on your shoulder, really reduced recoil from the hard plastic and made busting crows way way more fun... The angle crows come in can put a small portion of the buttstock on your shoulder a hard plastic makes it even worse... the limbsaver was one of the best recoil pads I have ever used with the bottom angled... I would not hesitate to use one on a lever action.
 

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.

Grind to fit is the only way.....if you have the tools. I use grid to fit on all hard kickers or those with stocks too short to fit my long arms.



Here is a Pachmayr on a 45-70.
 

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Many years ago when I was a hangaround at local gunsmith shop I watched as the master took an angle grinder to a pad installed on but stock. he used a couple layers of masking tape around the wood and very carefully shaped the recoil pad with a sanding disk installed on the grinder. It was an out the backdoor operation with all the rubber flying off the sanding wheel. That man was a real master, he would always impress on me that when working on guns everything needed to be gently persuaded.
 

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I've never done it, and maybe somebody that has can speak up, but I have read before some guys suggesting on the grinding/finishing to fit recoil pads that it can help to put them in the freezer for a time first? Supposedly hardens the material to make it easier and getting a better finish, etc., etc.
Might depend on the given material, but seemed to make some sense to me, especially if soft "stuff" so to say... but I dunno'... ha! Just something I tucked away to remember and/or maybe try myself someday perhaps... good luck to you.
 
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Freezing them does help. But you gotta make sure it's really frozen
 
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