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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Picked up a nice 336ASin 30-30, with safety, 1985 manufacture and have been trying to find a load it likes. 50 yard groups seem good usually 3 in an inch, but when I back up to 100 yards the groups seem a little bigger than they should. My loads are worked up, 170 Nosler with Varget, 150 Hornady with IMR 4064 and 160 grain Gummy tip Hornady with H Leverevolution powder. These are book loads with components matching the data all under max. Also some factory Federal Blue box 170 grain. 2 shots within an inch and the third 2 or so inches away. All groups are triangular, and I have been shooting slow as to not get the barrel to hot. No pressure issues, failure to feed or anything squirrely.

Also I have tried a soft hold on the for-end as I remember reading someplace it is easy to cant these carbines. My scope is a proven Leupold VX-II 2-7x33 set at 4 power. I know any one of these loads will work for eastern whitetail (Maine) just wondering if it is me.

I have just cleaned it thoroughly and my next load to try is Remington 170 grain hollow points and Imr 3031 in Winchester brass, WLRP. Thanks.
 
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Fireguy,

It sounds like you have some minor rifle issues that are unrelated to your hand loads. One or more of the loads you mentioned should be capable of decent consistency in a properly tuned rifle. There are a number of resources, including other threads on this forum, as well as an article on our website, that can give you some insight into methods of tuning for accuracy. Primarily, you will be relieving stresses and contact points while stabilizing the relationship between barrel, mag tube, and forend. I have had plenty of Marlins go from poor to good shooters with some tweaking. Read up, work methodically, and test as often as you can. Feel free to call us if you get stuck, but definitely try some tuning techniques before you chase loads into the setting sun.

Best,
AD
 

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When I didn't know better, when young. I got my 1st 336 marlin brand new in 1964. Hunted with the rifle till 1986. Rifle started to lose it's accuracy over the years, even with a scope on her.I wanted to pass it on to my son for his 16th birthday. I took it to a gun smith to check out, and wow! here is what he found. I never as a kid took the rifle bolt out to clean from the breach. Over the years , I damaged the muzzle crown by cleaning from the muzzle, Rifle lost it's accuracy. He recrowned the muzzle and The rifle was as accurate as the day I received her. It's a small thing to over look on a used rifle. See if that work,s. My son still uses the rifle and she still shoots great. Of course i clean everything from the breach now, thank's to the Army.
 

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Like Ranger Point mentioned, a tune up may be in order. I got my old Marlin and it would walke to the left ater the first shot, pretty badly. I took off the forearm and did a bit of sanding to relieve a pressure point and now it is plenty adequate for my uses, but will go South after about 3 shots. If I cannot do what I want with it with three shots I will likely screw up on the rest anyway. So far I have taken three deere with that old rifle with one shot. Accuracy needs are kind of a personal issue. For me if it is adequate for deer at the ranges I shoot, it is good enough. some like to go to the range and shoot small groups. Not critisizing another persons game.
but like mentioned, I would do a good tune up before shooting a lot of ammo.

DEP
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have just returned from the range. First before shooting I cleaned the rifle thoroughly with a gel barrel cleaner after removing the lever bolt and ejector (from the breech). First 2 shots at 50 yards (mostly to foul the bore ) taken with a soft hold were touching dead on. Letting the rifle cool completely I shot a 5 shot group slowly. It took over an hour. I used a level to make sure my target was square, and rested the receiver on the front bag. This technique works well with my 1895 and allows me to shoot respectable groups (under 2 inches with scope or Williams peep) at 100 yards. The 100 yard target looked like a pattern, maybe 4 inches. My scope is a 2 year old Leupold VXII I purchased from the custom shop, parallax set at 60 yards originally for a .22. I did notice I had a bit of trouble seeing the target and wonder if it could be the scope. To rule it out i mounted an old reliable Bushnell 4 power with Japanese lens. It is raining today so hope tomorrow or Friday to check again, then I will send the scope back to Leupold.
 

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I would double check your scope mounting....
For me - scope mounting is the devil..... Check for burrs and high spots around the tapped holes - the scope base needs to sit flush on the receiver... not high on a burr around the screw hole.

I am kinda a nut about scope mounts because I have had so much trouble with shifting scope mounts.... I glue them to the top of the receiver and screw them.... WAY less trouble this way....

Thanks
 

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Best Way to Set your Scope Mounts Is to Bed them w/ Lock Tite.
Just Squirt Some on the Bottom of the Bases when you do the Screws.
Tighten them down to Proper Torque(That's Right -Use a Torque Driver)
And, Then Wipe Off the excess. Makes Sure the Bases Don't Ever Shift.
Learned That One "In the Army"
UncleSarge58
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not the mount. It was/is the scope. 2 year old VXII 2-7x33 bought from the Leupld custom shop. I had originally bought it with 60 yard paralax correction for my .22. I had a 1.5x6 Simmons that was also a replacement sitting around and mounted it last night. Quick trip to range, 3 shots to zero and a nice triangular 1.5 inch group at 100 yards. Spent another half hour shooting clay birds at the backstop. I will send the Leupold back later. Thanks for the help.
 

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I shot 2 336 - 35 Rem's yesterday side by side from sand bags. The one with the Skinner peep was shooting about 1.5-2" groups at 100yds. The one with the 3-9 Vortex scope was doing good just to keep up with the open sighted one, much less do any better.
Of course there could be lots of variables, but I am betting on trigger differences. The one with open sights has a superb trigger. It seemed to always go off at just the right time when the sights were aligned with the target. It always felt like a good shot.
The one with the scope is about the same pull weight and is generally smooth, except it has a tiny bit of creep then a tiny catch then the smoothness. With such a trigger it seemed it always went off when it was just off the mark.
This morning I did a little more stoning on the bad trigger's sear and hope this evening when I put the crosshairs on a big boar hog the gun will go off at just the perfect time.

It seems the more I shoot the more I have begun to notice just how much difference a trigger can make on my accuracy.

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