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Hey folks

I just recently acquired my 2nd firearm ever, a 336XLR in 30-30. I lurked here for months and read all the online articles about Rem taking over production ops and all of that. I was willing to take a moderate amount of risk to own this rifle but i felt like I did all the prep work to make sure I got a great gun. I also read that most of the QC issues were going up and my 3 local gun shops all independently agreed its pretty much worry free to own a brand new Marlin. Getting to the point, I put my hands on the rifle, looked at fit, finish, cycled it. I was excited in the store (after all in my area this rifle was hard to find). So I snapped up what I was waiting for, for several months. To my complete surprise, I got home, opened the box, set up my rifle for a quick disassemble/cleaning and what do I find, but the ss barrel is completely "lumpy". Some guys on here have called it a ripple. It sounds like the same thing. Whether it was the lighting or something else, i did not see this in the store.

Side profile view, and from the bottom, the barrel looks straight. Heck, when the light shines on it, I get one completely straight beam of light in the reflection. When I shoulder the rifle and look down the sights, the sides and the top of the barrel look completely uneven, almost like it was forged into a barrel shape with a hammer. The same beam if light in reflection is not nearly as true. When I pinch it with my fingers and run my fingers up and down the length of the barrel, I can feel very slight ups and downs. I've read that this could be the 1) a poor finishing job or 2) that they changed the way Rem is rifling these barrels now and that when they use the button process this is what the finished product looks like because they basically started with a finished barrel and it messes with it. But, I have seen new Marlins with much nicer barrels both blued and ss.

Inside the bore, as far as I can tell looks straight and done right. The rifling lights up in a wonderful spiral with a bore light and looks very uniform. Also, i see the REM stamp on the bottom right of the barrel- so this thing as been proof fired, right?

Guys, what do I do? I'm content to live with this thing as is, if it's just cosmetic. That said, I want it to shoot well, and problem free. I have some concern about sending it back to the factory and then having to deal with new problems (like the new barrel being screwed on too tight and the sights canted).

What do smarter people than me say? Despite thinking I took every precaution, I still got bit by a new Remlin.
 

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Hey Zino, welcome from Alabama... I haven't been keeping up with this particular gremlin, but others have... Keep checking back for answers...
 

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Thanks. I had read this thread last night which is how I know what I know now, but I haven't fired the rifle, and wanted to see what other Marlin owners had to say first. Send it back, or shoot if it makes you happy (and that means it does what its supposed to and not like shooting like a slug out of a smooth bore). I want to be accurate at 100. open sights.
 

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Zino, welcome to Marlin Owners. Can you post a few pictures of your Marlin with some close up angle shots of the barrel. That and any other problems you think need to be addressed.

How To Post Photo's
I have a contact in Marlin Tech dept, depending upon what the pictures reveal, I may PM you his contact info. He's a great guy who will take care of you.

Jack
 

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Welcome to MO. The proof will be in the pudding on your new rifle; I don't think it will be unsafe to fire, and will probably shoot fine. The question is whether you want to live with a cosmetically flawed premium product.
 

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Hey folks

I just recently acquired my 2nd firearm ever, a 336XLR in 30-30. I lurked here for months and read all the online articles about Rem taking over production ops and all of that. I was willing to take a moderate amount of risk to own this rifle but i felt like I did all the prep work to make sure I got a great gun. I also read that most of the QC issues were going up and my 3 local gun shops all independently agreed its pretty much worry free to own a brand new Marlin. Getting to the point, I put my hands on the rifle, looked at fit, finish, cycled it. I was excited in the store (after all in my area this rifle was hard to find). So I snapped up what I was waiting for, for several months. To my complete surprise, I got home, opened the box, set up my rifle for a quick disassemble/cleaning and what do I find, but the ss barrel is completely "lumpy". Some guys on here have called it a ripple. It sounds like the same thing. Whether it was the lighting or something else, i did not see this in the store.

Side profile view, and from the bottom, the barrel looks straight. Heck, when the light shines on it, I get one completely straight beam of light in the reflection. When I shoulder the rifle and look down the sights, the sides and the top of the barrel look completely uneven, almost like it was forged into a barrel shape with a hammer. The same beam if light in reflection is not nearly as true. When I pinch it with my fingers and run my fingers up and down the length of the barrel, I can feel very slight ups and downs. I've read that this could be the 1) a poor finishing job or 2) that they changed the way Rem is rifling these barrels now and that when they use the button process this is what the finished product looks like because they basically started with a finished barrel and it messes with it. But, I have seen new Marlins with much nicer barrels both blued and ss.

Inside the bore, as far as I can tell looks straight and done right. The rifling lights up in a wonderful spiral with a bore light and looks very uniform. Also, i see the REM stamp on the bottom right of the barrel- so this thing as been proof fired, right?

Guys, what do I do? I'm content to live with this thing as is, if it's just cosmetic. That said, I want it to shoot well, and problem free. I have some concern about sending it back to the factory and then having to deal with new problems (like the new barrel being screwed on too tight and the sights canted).

What do smarter people than me say? Despite thinking I took every precaution, I still got bit by a new Remlin.
Zino,
Sorry you got this rifle in this condition.
I'm eager to see what these "ripples" look like on the Barrel.
Please post some pictures from various angles with different amounts of lighting so we can diagnose what has, or hasn't been done to your rifle.
From your description, it seems like you just have a cosmetic problem.
I don't believe you will have any function/accuracy issues.
The pictures should speak volumes.
 

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1st pic of barrel wave on 336xlr

It turns out that this is hard to capture on camera because it involves lighting and touch. I think this shot will allow you guys to see what I see when looking down the barrel with light from my window. Keep in mind, what you see here that doesn't look quite smooth, doesn't feel smooth either. But if you looked at it from directly above, you can't see it or in low light, you can't see it. Let me know what you think and I will try to find some better shots to upload.

remlin wave.jpg
 

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I also doubt there are any safety/functional issues with it, and your call. If anything, I think it would take some high rates of fire/really hot barrel for any possible accuracy issues to show up; not likely with a lever in normal usage? Personally, I would at least contact Marlin to complain, be a "squeaky wheel," even send pictures if possible, or stuff like this will just continue to happen. I know it would bug me being brand new though...
You know, I actually have a hard time understanding what their process is here is to make that happen frankly..though I can imagine some. I used to make gun barrels for a living, and we probably would have had to try to get a surface profile like that on final turn; unnecessary.. and I don't get it.
Good luck to you.
 

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Zino,
Thanks for the pictures.

1) The 1st one shows that you have a lousy Polishing Finish on the Barrel.
It almost looks like they had Huge Chatter Marks from a Dull, or Chipped Toolbit when they were turned in the Lathe.
If I were them, that is the 1st place I would start to address this problem.

2) I don't know for a fact if they are still using our Polishing Equipment from North Haven Marlin.
If they are, somebody needs to change the Belts, and Teach them how to Properly Polish Barrels.

My advice to you is if you're Happy with the Rifle Functioning Properly, and is Accurate you might want to live with the finish.
If you send it back to them, there's no telling what else can go wrong when they get their hands on it.

If the Finish bothers you, send it back, and hope for the best that they ONLY ADDRESS YOUR BARREL FINISH ISSUE.

Good Luck.
 

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Pretty bad when you got a substandard product and you can't even trust the manufacturer to fix it right. I hope it shoots ok. Problems like this keep me buying JM guns ONLY!
 

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Welcome to MO. The proof will be in the pudding on your new rifle; I don't think it will be unsafe to fire, and will probably shoot fine. The question is whether you want to live with a cosmetically flawed premium product.

Premium product……….that's a funny one.
 

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I owned a Savage Mark II BV .22 rimfire rifle that exhibited ripples in the finish. It drove me crazy looking down the barrel. In its defense, it was the most accurate .22 rimfire rifle I've ever owned, let alone seen. With match grade ammo, it was a one-hole rifle at 25 yards. Not a ragged hole, a single hole. It was an incredible rifle.

My guess is it is purely cosmetic. As many ripples that are on it, I'd be prone to want a new barrel though.
 

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I also doubt there are any safety/functional issues with it, and your call. If anything, I think it would take some high rates of fire/really hot barrel for any possible accuracy issues to show up; not likely with a lever in normal usage? Personally, I would at least contact Marlin to complain, be a "squeaky wheel," even send pictures if possible, or stuff like this will just continue to happen. I know it would bug me being brand new though...
You know, I actually have a hard time understanding what their process is here is to make that happen frankly..though I can imagine some. I used to make gun barrels for a living, and we probably would have had to try to get a surface profile like that on final turn; unnecessary.. and I don't get it.
Good luck to you.

As I said in a previous post, one method of finishing and polishing a barrel is to put ball-bearing handles on the ends and sweep it past a belt grinder using progressively finer grits. I've done this while removing the squarish edges off some big plumbing pipe for a new drill press column, it's easy to get going too fast and leave helical tracks. A production version would be to mount the barrel between centers and move the belt grinder past it mechanically to clean up machining marks. If the machine operator sets the traverse too fast and it repeatedly goes over the same area at the same speed, you'd get those helical marks like that. Given Remlington's emphasis on cheap and speedy production, i have no doubt that something like this is what happened along with inexperienced machine operators. What it looks like outside has no bearing on how the barrel shoots.

Stan S.
 
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