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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Whats the rate of twist of the 336's chambered in 32 Special? Ballard and MG? Thanks much
 

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FredT is correct. 1-16 since it was introduced in 1902. Same as the 32-40. Early on the .32 Special used the same 165gr 32-40 bullet and was
devastating on deer. So much so that the shooters of the time period complained to Winchester till they offered a full patch bullet to cut down on meat loss. A 1910 survey of deer hunters ranked the .32 Special #1 for DRT kills, and the 30-06 ranked #2. It was all about the "soft" bullet
used early on in the .32 Specials career.
358 Win
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's what I was looking for, thanks. If it ain't broke don't fix it!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have been doing some digging and have unearthed the rumor that some early Marlin 336's and 36's had 1 in 10 twists and undersize bores of around .318-.319" Can anyone shed light on this?
 

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RIF,
I've heard of the small bore thing but everyone who made a .32 Special made the 1-16 as far as I know. 1-16 twist because of shooting black powder reloads with cast lead bullets. 1-16 is easier on the lead bullet and helps cut down on black powder fouling for a few more shots as opposed to a 1-12 twist.
358 Win
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
From what I heard they put large diameter 30-30 barrels on some of late 40's Marlins. This would mean 1-10 twist.

Does anyone have an Marlin in this era they would care to comment on? From what I understand Marlin knows (knew) about this and is documented in their records.
 

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Kind of late replying, but read with interest the comments regarding twist rate in .32 special rifles. I have two of them and checked the twist rate. First is a Marlin 36RC serial number D20581 (1947) with a twist of 1 in 10". The other is a Marlin 336A serial number K37303 (1953) with a twist of 1 in 16". So it appears that RIF is correct regarding the faster twist in some of the Marlins made in the late 40s. Interesting to note that when the 36RC was roll stamped, The M in Marlin ended up underneath the fore end band. Hmmm. Don`t know about bores being undersize (.218-.219)??
 

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Sharpe's book The Rifle In America copyrighr 1938 p618 lists bore diameter and groove depth. For Marlin 93 32 Special and 32-40 bore dia. .313 and groove depth .0025. If my math is correct that is a groove dia. of .318.
 

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Interesting Jakola.

Since you have both versions, I have to ask, do you see any difference in accuracy between the two?
 

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Mine 1951 slugs .317. Have not slugged my XLR yet.

(added)
OK... mispoke when I said XLR. XLR is a long way from a 336A made in 1952 but fiddling with both the 30-30s and the 32s tonight.

Just slugged the other waffle top, and that one has seen a lot of action with a bore showing more wear than the ADL.

This one just slugged at .318 a couple inches above the throat and .317 an inch from the muzzle.
 

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there's a thread (down in the reloading section, i think) on marlin 32 special bores that didn't, as i recall, specify age or ballard/microgroove distinctions; it averaged .319, i believe, for a dozen or more who had slugged them. results were from a low of .317 to a high of .320 or .321. since the winchester spec is supposed to be .322, maybe the marlin gurus tried old arthur savage's stunt of squeezing a bigger slug to increase pressures/muzzle velocities like he's supposed to have done in his 303 savage. rumor has it his original proprietary rounds were .311's like the brit 303, even though his bores were .308. if so, and if it works, it makes our marlins hotter than the competition--not just better made. all i know is mine shoots .321's strong and straight! i'm going to give some old jacketed 32-40 160's and 165's a try, even though they mic .320. should be able to find that thread and follow up on those other fellas.
mind yer topknots!
windy
 
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My 1952 336SC slugged at.318, and I can't find a load it shoots well. My 1958-59 336A slugged at .320 and shoots the Hornady FTX like they were made for eachother.
 

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I just slugged my model 93 32 Special and it is .3135 bore bore and .319 groove. Not sire of dob but the tang is stamped model 93 so it is after 1905. Serial is 44xxC which before 1900 which doesn't make sense unless I was looking at the wrong table. My 1948 336RC 32 Special is .314 x .3195.
 

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How late has anyone found a fast twist 32 Special? I just picked up a nice 1952 model 336RC and after cleaning it, I was admiring the bore, and it looks a little different than my 336-A.DL. Dumb me didn't measure the twist, and am not going to take the lever and bolt out just to do that. Hopefully I will remember to do it the next time I shoot/clean it! Very nice bore with very crisp rifling on the RC. My A.DL shoots great but isn't near as nice in the bore as the RC; the RC has been very lightly used.
 

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Well Dave Bulla, You`re probably a much better marksman than I am. I`m 10 years older than the 36RC, so the old eyes ain`t what they used to be. All I can tell you is that best I can do is put the bullets in about a 4" circle at 50 yards with open sights on either rifle. I guess that doesn`t tell you much, as I don`t really see much difference in accuracy. Mind you, the 36RC has a 20" barrel, while the 336A has a 24" barrel. Don`t know if that would make any difference in accuracy, probably just a slight increase in velocity. I suppose it would depend a lot on condition of the bore and expertise of the shooter and the type of ammo and a whole bunch of other stuff. Both rifles have very good bores. I have a nice Redfield receiver sight I plan on installing on one of them, so that may improve my shooting a bit. Have to find a taller front sight somewhere. Pretty cold here in Northern Ontario this time of year. Have to wait on some warmer weather to get back out shooting.
 

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Kind of late replying, but read with interest the comments regarding twist rate in .32 special rifles. I have two of them and checked the twist rate. First is a Marlin 36RC serial number D20581 (1947) with a twist of 1 in 10". The other is a Marlin 336A serial number K37303 (1953) with a twist of 1 in 16". So it appears that RIF is correct regarding the faster twist in some of the Marlins made in the late 40s. Interesting to note that when the 36RC was roll stamped, The M in Marlin ended up underneath the fore end band. Hmmm. Don`t know about bores being undersize (.218-.219)??
Very interesting, thanks jakola. i'm thinking about loading up some cast for my 1948 32, and my 1950 30-30. I will check the 32 for the twist rate.
 
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