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Federal Blue Box 150 and 170 grain ammo. Bass Pro sells it for about $18.50 a box.

Its very consistent ammo, I get good distance and accuracy from this ammo, despite my shooting skills are not what they use to be. I'm working on it.

What good is a particular caliber of a particular kind of ammo if you can't afford to shoot it? I see a lot of 22 owners crying the blues about the prices, and their right. At one time folks could get into target shooting at a reasonable price. Low cost of buying a rifle, and even lower price of buying ammo. I see a lot of 22's for sale these days. I'll stick with my 30-30's for range practice and a little fun!



Cheers!


Mike T.
 

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Yeah, I'd horde them too! That was great ammo! The current Winchester ammo is OK, but what they use to make was better. But then, the rifles we shot 50 years ago were better made too.


Mike T.
 

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Too many variables to proclaim one 30-30 cartridge is best. Best for what purpose? Best as in what characteristics?

The "best" cartridge in my 30-30, in my current situation, is a hand-loaded Lee C309-150-F, over-top IMR 4064.

The factory cartridges I've tried so far, weren't precise enough. If I were to have found a factory round that was precise enough, (and I am sure there are some that would have been,) that would have been my "favorite."
That choice didn't come from "wisdom.".. and it has little to offer others, since maybe 80% of the other 30-30s may not shoot that ammo precisely.
As long as the rifle/ammo combination is precise enough, the bullet hard enough to hold together while penetrating into the vitals, (probably a non issue,) shot placement does the rest.

...but seeing that I live in Ohio, whereas the 30-30 can only hunt varmints and the like; light, precise, bullets will do.
Now if I lived one state to the east, I would consider using the Lee C309-170-F to hunt black bear.
Yep, "Best for what purpose". That is the key ingredient. We use different caliber guns for different size game, so we would use different ammunition for different purposes. Unless I missed it, I don't remember seeing WHERE the OP lives. That is important too. Being that I live "One state to the east", I had to change the caliber firearm I use even for deer season because of the large number of bears we have in PA. My 30-30's would have no trouble putting down a PA deer, but if I end up being in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong bear even during deer season, I will have a Marlin 336 chambered in 35 REM on the hunt. We have had two hunters that were attacked by black bears in the last few years and in both cases the hunters were injured and hospitalized. So, although I don't feel like I "need" a 35 REM to take down a deer, I want that extra firepower in case I run into the above problem bear.

So there is no one size fits all round for a 30-30, it depends on what and where you are hunting.



Mike T.
 
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I have a good stock of Federal Ammunition. It shoots good groups, is reliable, and to be honest it is less expensive than both Winchester and Remington ammunition. Being that I primarily use my 30-30's for target practice at the Range, Federal has proven to be the best value for me. Now, in 35 Remington, I have boxes of Hornady 200 grain ammunition because its readily available. I also like the longer range of that ammunition than flat point ammo. Last season I was able to snag a box of Remington "round points" in 35 REM in case I was looking for a shorter range shot than the Hornady and want something other than a flex tip round to stop a bear. So it goes back to what and where. Anyway, there is no such thing as "too much ammo". :top:


Mike T.
 
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