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It is not the same cartridge as the 25-35W and it was not originally loaded as hot. There were several threads about them sometime back so I would look in the archives as some members even shot deer with one. Includes case forming as well as shooting the 25-35 in one. I believe the 25-35 might chamber in a Marlin but the 25-36 will not chamber in a Win.

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I have looked and I do not see the dies. I may have passed them on to another person and don't remember. I will look again latter, I know I had a set!
 

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While the 38-55 is fine for anything I would shoot, I think the 40-60 would have a lot of potential it they are the ones based on the 30-40 Krag case. Some are made out of the 303 Brit case. Always thought the 444 should have been a 405 Win reintroduction. Won't see them. 38-55 uses the same bolt as a 30-30. 40's would take both off caliber barrels and bolt faces. they lack manufacturing economies. Is the 25-25 Savage in the 99 a bit tricky to get cases for?

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I think he meant to say 25-35 Win. I also shoot the Stevens 25-20 SS, 25-20, 30-40, 32-20, 32-40, 38-40, 44-40 and 45-75. The 25-20 SS is a little scarce but can be found. Yep, like the old ones!
 

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My understanding is that the .25-36 case neck is a tad longer than the .25-35. Therefore, the 25-35 works in the 25-36 chamber, but not the reverse.

If I ever see a nice one priced well, I would have to try. I have considered having a 336 converted.
 

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The 25-36 Marlin is not mentioned a lot. I have one on the way. Is it a problem child? Gonna to reload for it so any help will be appreciated. I have everything but the dies. One step at a time.

Thanks
It's a great, accurate, cartridge and anything 'Cartridges of the World' has to say about it should be discarded. The author must have been a relative of Ollie Winchester. They describe the cartridge as being weaker and inferior to the .25-35 Winchester and that's nonsense. The parent cartridge of the .25-36 Marlin is the .32-40 Marlin cartridge. Yes Winchester even purloined the name of the .32-40 Marlin and called it the .32-40 Winchester cartridge but the Marlin-Ballard company developed it.

The .25-36 Marlin round has a longer neck than the .25-35 Winchester cartridge and therefore while the .25-35 Winchester cartridge will chamber in the .25-36 Marlin rifle the converse is not so... 25-36 Marlin brass is hard to come by but is still available from some suppliers whose names slip my memory. I think there's an outfit called 'Classic Cartridges' that puts it out in small runs.

As I said the parent cartridge is the .32-40 Marlin (or Winchester if you insist) and this is the correct length and may be necked down to the .25-36 Marlin in proper conversion dies but in a pinch the .25-36 Marlin resizing die will do it if the case is rotated half way down the die during the operation. .32-40 Marlin brass is also a little difficult to get but Starline usually has it. Some folk uses the .30-30 case but it's really too short. The .38-55 case is better to use as it's a trifle longer. I wouldn't try resizing a .38-55 case unless I had the conversion dies or the case may get stuck.

The conversion dies and standard .25-36 Marlin dies are available (expensively so) from R.C.B.S. whose quality is very high. Home brewed cast bullets with gas checks are the best to shoot over Alliant's 2400 or I.M.R 4198. I don't like the fast burning powders like Unique that some people use because of the unpredictable pressure spikes that can occur with these fast burning powders although I must say they're very popular.

All loading data for the .25-36 Marlin can be obtained from reading Ken Water's "Pet Loads". Unfortunately, this very fine cartridge essentially went obsolete in the mid-1920's probably unfairly overshadowed by the .25-35 Winchester. I have two of them in the Marlin Model of 1893 (one a takedown model) and both shoot to a velocity of 1800 f.p.s. with 2" groups at 80 yards. Always cast and shoot bullets at least one to two-thousandths of an inch overbore to avoid blow-by gases leading up your rifle and giving terrible accuracy. The overbore factor along with the gas check will mitigate those factors.

That means you will need to slug the barrel of your new rifle to determine the groove diameter. It is possible to shoot the jacketed bullet designed for the .25-06 rifle but a new cannelure must be cut in the jacket to accept the .25-36 Marlin crimp. Cannelure cutting machines are expensive. Jacketed bullets are hard on the softer steel barrels in vintage rifles. The technical name for the dies which convert one type of brass from one caliber to another is "reforming dies". I have used the word "conversion dies". Same difference. Reforming dies are also a trifle expensive but again R.C.B.S has very good quality ones. Hope all this helps.
 
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