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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
I was in a LGS today and I found these. W-W 25-20 unfired brass. I didn't count them all to see if there were 50, but it looks like a full box.
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If anyone is interested, PM me and I'll give the contact info. General area is a little bit south of Dayton, OH.
 

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You certainly dont run across them very often. I stocked up on them a couple years ago, I have 450 pieces that I need to load.
 

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Thanks for the heads up. PM sent.
 

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Those are some of the most difficult brass to reload of any centerfire. Seating the bullets without crushing the necks is difficult unless you have lots of experience.
 

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A gunshop on the Darling Downs in SW Queensland has an ample supply of unprimed Winchester .25-20 brass at $40 AUD for a bag of 50.
I bought 200 cases. Open the first bag of fifty and only got 5 reloads out of them before the necks split. They were annealed before first loading too!
Hence to say another order was place to duplicate the first and they still had ample stock.
 

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Those are some of the most difficult brass to reload of any centerfire. Seating the bullets without crushing the necks is difficult unless you have lots of experience.
I’ll not dispute what the poster mentions, I’ve heard the same old song for at least 45 years. OTOH, I’ve been loading the .25-20 in several firearms for over 30 years and don’t remember ever collapsing a neck, or damaging one in any way. That includes headstamped .25-20 brass as well as reformed .32-20 cases and even nickeled brass. Too, I’ve loaded both jacketed and cast bullets. Yes I’m an experienced handloader, but I had 30 years less experience 30 years ago. I don’t treat .25-20 (or .32-20 for that matter) cases any differently than I do other brass, although I am careful with cases in all calibers. But I’m nothing special.

Perhaps it’s because of die design. I’ve always used Redding dies, and they may not over-size the necks or under-expand them as other brands might. Maybe the seater die is made to tighter tolerances and starts seating the bullets straighter. Or perhaps it’s because I chamfer the inside of the necks - as I do with all brass. Personally, I had trouble with .22 Hornet necks…




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Hell I’ve totally destroyed 41 mg brass. It was all me not paying attention.
 
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