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that stocks not so bad. I have taken them and put them in a hot water bath of oxy clean and scrubbed them with a soft brush. get the water where you can just stand to put your hands in it and lay the oxy clean to it! you will be surprised at how many of the dents the hot water will pull out. and when you are done the water will be dark brown from the oil and when the wood dries it will turn white. all the oil will be sucked out. then you can stain and oil, sometimes I just oil with no stain. use boiled linseed oil. if you use tung oil use nothing but tung oil from "the milk paint store" on line. it is real and has no polymers like the junk you buy from the store. but personally I see little difference between BLO and real tung oil,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
 

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Yep, that stock will clean up and look like new.
A little effort and time will make it look good. When I use linseed oil, I sand in the first few light linseed oil coats. The sawdust and oil help fill the grain and ends up making a very smooth finish. Then usually another 2-3 coats without sanding.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
BLO and sanding is the plan for now.
Here is a new-be question.
I should take the finish off before trying to do anything about the oil stains?
 

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BLO and sanding is the plan for now.
Here is a new-be question.
I should take the finish off before trying to do anything about the oil stains?
if it has a varnish type finish, this is what I would. put on some easy strip, or other varnish remover. it all works good. then I may lightly, lightly! sand it. do not get it out of shape, especially on the sharp edges and corners, it is easy to do. do not try to sand out the deep gouges, let the hot water do all it can with that, I don't try to make wood look brand new, because it will look like you did and I try to match it with the old worn bluing finish of the gun, that is all it needs,,,,,,,
 

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You have gotten good answers and suggestions already. I use Citrus strip on all of my stock redoes. Less odor and nasty chemicals.
I also run the stocks and forearms through the dishwasher with a couple of spoonfuls of dishwasher detergent, on a light setting and without any heat drying. I did this to an M1 Garand stock that had 70+ years of grime and oil rubbed into it. This stock came out clean and after a few hours of air drying was nice and white. The nice thing, no mess to clean up.
Andrew
 

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That damage on the butt looks like barbed wire damage, and olschool is right. To get it slick you will change the character of the wood enough it won't match the rest of the rifle.
Your photos with the red stain look good. All put together, the rifle will have a patina that accents the wear and love the rifle has had in it's day. Well done.
 

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If the hot water does not get the deeper dents out, break out the iron and a damp rag. The rag should be thick like a washcloth and then fold so the heat from the iron will not burn the wood. What you are after is steam. The steam will swell the wood more than the hot water for the larger dings. Oh, mind your fingers. The steam will bite!
 

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If you want to start from scratch strip it and soak it in acetone. Finish as you like it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
At this point It takes about 4-5 finger tips (pad?) of oil to cover the grip and another 2 to cover the fore grip, I expect to be at this another few weeks at least.
Not looking to hide anything just giving it the respect it deserves.
 
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