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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just bought a drilled and tapped 1951 Marlin 336 with the first tap (two holes) in the receiver and the other tap (two holes) in the barrel, just behind the iron. It is fun to shoot, I just wish the irons were good enough to actually hit something!

I've put sometime in shooting this with just the iron sight at the range and at 50 yards I have to bury the sights at least a foot down to hit the target (forget about 100 yards, it doesn't hit anything). I can hit a bullseye at 50 yards with slugs on my mossberg 12 gauge with just the front bead, so I'm an OK shot... but this Marlin is so off I have to get it scoped.

Here's the dilemma, looking at it, it was definitely scoped by the previous owner, it's even drilled and tapped for a scope (despite it being a 1951), but the first two taps are at the back of the receiver and the other two are on the barrel!

What kind of mount do I use for a tap job like this, I'm stumped! I need help.

Mike
 

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A lot of the early rifles were scoped in that way, there would be two small scope bases instead of a one-piece base. When the holes were drilled and tapped in your rifle the one-piece bases were not widely available like they are today.

Your options are to find two bases that fit the holes already there and mount your scope, or have new holes drilled and tapped in the receiver to mount a one-piece base. Then you could put plug screws in the unused holes or leave them open.

I'm curious why the iron sights are off so much. With the proper sights it should shoot better than you describe. I'd take it to a gunsmith and have him take a look. You should be able to shoot at least 100 yards pretty accurately with iron sights. Maybe they were changed at some point and are not the right ones for your gun or are not adjusted correctly. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow. Thanks for the info! I found a mount for the barrel, but the aftermarket mount I found for the receiver came with screws that are too big. I guess I'll take it to a gunsmith and let them work it over.

Not sure why the sights are so off... but the front bead does look like it was bent to the right at some point, but the big "off" is elevation, I have the staircase all the way out and it's still high.

I picked up this 336 for $275 at Kittery Trading Post in Maine and I do love it, I just need to get it accurate.
 

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I have run into the same situation on a couple 336-A's. The early mounts were far apart to accommodate the length of the scopes of the time. I also ran into the different size screw holes and had to have new holes put in the receiver. Fortunately a one piece base covers the extra holes and a couple screws from the tapped receiver mount holes on another gun will fill the holes on the barrel. Unless you are very lucky with the location of the original screw holes, you will end up paying for four holes tapped as I did.
 
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My first year production 336ADL shot 8-10 inches high with the elevator out (gone). The gun shows a lot of use, so it makes me wonder why someone used it that way for 60 years. Ammo from days of yore carried about the same muzzle velocity as todays. jack
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I can probably get away with the existing taps using a two piece mount... I just need to find some replacement screws to match up with the rear taps, the screw I have are too long for the mount and taps.

where is a good place to order some replacement screws?
 

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Try MidwayUSA or Brownells for the screws. It'll help if you know the screw size and thread pitch. If you want Iron sights on the rifle that shoot well you could try either replacing the rear sight with a receiver peep sight or replacing both sights with a matched set. I put a Williams receiver peep on my 336 and I love it, so much more accurate than the original sight. It does shoot a bit higher than the factory (about 4" @100 yds) but I think I can cure that by milling a little bit off the bottom of the rear sight. I'd rather mill a tiny bit off the rear sight than replace the front with a taller sight. If you want factory type irons sights you could replace the front sight, just remember if it shoots low then you need a shorter sight if it shoots high you need a taller sight, it's counter-intuitive.

Stu
 
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Just a quick comment - If your rifle is shooting high, a taller front sight is needed; low, a shorter front sight. (exactly the opposite
from the movement of the rear sight...)
 

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You say you have to bury the front sight to hit the target, that means it's too short. Has it been ground down? Is the bead even still there? If it just looks like a blade front, it might have had the bead broken off at some time. I bought a 22 with that problem this past spring. Didn't even realize the front sight was broken until I was cleaning it one time. Might have been done purposely by the previous owner if he scoped the gun and didn't like seeing the fuzzy ghost image of the front sight in the scope. It's a pretty simple matter to change the front sight.
 

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My first year production 336ADL shot 8-10 inches high with the elevator out (gone). The gun shows a lot of use, so it makes me wonder why someone used it that way for 60 years. Ammo from days of yore carried about the same muzzle velocity as todays. jack
I have an 1893 in .30-30 with factory Marlin-Heburn receiver sight...With it set on the lowest setting, shooting 150gr Federal blue-box, I have to hold at the bottom of an 8.5"x11.5" piece of paper to get the bullet on the page at 50 yards, and then it is still 2-3" high...With my 160gr hand loaded cast at appx. 1500fps, I have to have the rear sight 4 clicks up and hold dead on at 50 yards...

This may explain why/how someone put up with your "high-shooting" sights for so long...
 
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