Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1950 336 chambered in 35 remington and the butt and fore end have checkering. I'm curious if anyone knows if this was a factory offering or done afterwards. Thanks. I seem to be having trouble uploading pictures since my iPad doesn't play we'll with this site so no pictures unfortunately.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,131 Posts
I don't know if they ever did any factory checkering in 1950. If they did I am guessing it was very rare. My guess is they didn't do it and someone replaced the stocks but not really knowing and no pictures it is pure guess. Now there are some around here that will give you the real answer before long so work on those pictures while we wait.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
Pictures would help, all I can tell you is my '50 has no checkering.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
25,165 Posts
Yes--certain models had checkering and they are worth more moola since they are rare. The 336A with 24 inch barrel came in an ADL model--the one with checkering plus the wood should be nicer. There were other versions made with wood checkering as well. It would be helpful if you could post pics of your rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
factory butt stock for sure, has the bullseye and marlin butt plate the only reason i even bring it up is that i saw pictures of a dressed up model 336 that they are coming out with and it has the same fluer deliees(im sure that is spelled wrong) on the pistol grip as mine. I just always assumed that they were hand cut or something later on in its life. Anyway here are the pictures, thanks all for the help.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
If it came from the factory as an ADL the tang will have an X stamped on it. You'll have to pull the stock off to see it. If it is an ADL and in 35 Rem. and the first year it was produced in that caliber you have a rare gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,448 Posts
The ADL and SD were both checkered from the get go in '48 on until dropped in the '60 s IIRC. I have a scruffy '48 ADL. Despite a past hard life it is slick,accurate, and sweet.

Sad story. An Austin hippy brought it into a gun shop and said that it had been both his father's and his grandfather,s gun, and he wanted it out of the house. Shop keeper obliged him and gave him just about the price of a nice dinner for two, provided the wine wasn't too fancy. I gave the store a fifty dollar profit and brought it to a nice retirement home. It is not real pretty. Lots of hard use behind it. Every time I drag it out, I wonder what the story is behind the notch filed in the forearm and how this or that gouge came about. No rust, but a collector, it is not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the info on the hidden mark. You say I'll have to remove the butt stock to see the x mark on the tang of the receiver then I might have to bring home a long screw driver and check or I'll just leave it alone for fear of ruining something on it. I have no intention of selling it anyhow I was just curuious if I had something special or not since i never see a 1950 with checkering. Thanks again for the info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Although hard to tell from the pics posted, it appears the checkered panels on your gun are much larger than the standard checkered panels Marlin used on original ADL models; so my vote is that those panels were done after-market. As further indication that this is after-market work, I suggest you check the data from an original 1950 Marlin catalog. The 336SC and A models chambered in 35 Rem were first introduced and cataloged in 1950; however the 1950 catalog and price list do not show the 336A as being offered in the ADL configuration (nor as an SD), only in the standard uncheckered A configuration (although ADL's were available in 30/30 and 32 Win. special chamberings for 1950).
For whatever this is worth, it is not unusual to see early vintage Marlin levers with checkered stocks; and the reason that is true is that there were a fair number of unemployed workers from the gunmaking industry available to do such work. People who were displaced from the shutdown of companies like Parker and L.C. Smith during and after WWII; as well as other gunmakers who dropped some of their more labor intensive models (the Ithaca NID and Fox double guns, etc). These workers were highly skilled and most continued their trade in home workshops and garages in order to make a living as jobs were hard to find after WWII.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,357 Posts
Thats not a factory checkering pattern.Looks nice though!:biggrin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok that was my thought that this looks too hand done to be factory done. Rare or not I love this gun and plan on taking it on a hog hunt next year. Cycles like butter and someone did some very good trigger work on it. No take up with about a 2.5-3lb pull.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top